This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

ANTH 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
One World Many Peoples Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Acquaints students with historical and contemporary approaches in Anthropology to the study of social and cultural variation.

Note: Students with previous credit for ANTH 110 may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 211.3 — 1/2(3L)
Cultural Competency in Community Health and Violence Intervention

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the anthropological grounding of cultural competency and its application to community, health, and violence intervention programming. The course uses a “case-study” approach so that the application of academic cultural competency models can be critically assessed.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111.3 or permission of the instructor.


ANTH 224.3 — 1/2(3L)
North American Plains Ethnography

A comprehensive survey of the ethnography, ethnohistory, and contemporary cultural issues facing the peoples of the North American plains. The composition and development of the plains culture complex and the impact of culture change will be considered centrally in this course.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111.3 or NS 107.3 or ARCH 112.3 or permission of instructor.


ANTH 226.3 — 1/2(3L)
Business and Industrial Anthropology

Examination of the utility of cultural anthropology's concepts, theory, methodology and insights in creatively influencing the conduct of domestic and international business. Cross-cultural business etiquette, understanding of marketing and consumer behaviour, and importance of intercultural negotiation in solving business problems in multicultural/transnational organizational settings are also discussed.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or completion of 30 credit units at the university level including a 100-level social science course.


ANTH 227.3 — 1/2(3L)
Cultures of Central and Eastern Europe

Broadly considers society and culture in Eastern and Central Europe, how the region today is related to both the socialist and pre-socialist pasts, and how ethnography as a key research tool used by anthropologists helps to account for sociocultural changes the region is undergoing since the late 1980's.

Formerly: ANTH 298.
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or completion of 30 credit units at the university level, including an introductory social science course.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 298 Special Topics: Cultures of Central and Eastern Europe may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 230.3 — 1/2(3L)
Cultural Dynamics

Examines some of the major dimensions of non-material culture including religion, magic, and constructs of space and time. It also examines processes of enculturation and culture change.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or permission of instructor.


ANTH 231.3 — 1/2(3L)
Cross Cultural Perspectives on Health and Illness

This course is an introduction to contemporary medical anthropology. It surveys anthropological approaches to the relationship between socio-cultural factors and illness, health, healing practices, the body, and mind. The ways in which social, cultural and political forces impact how various forms of human health and illness are understood, experienced, and dealt with will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or 30 credit units of university courses including an introductory social sciences course.


ANTH 233.3 — 1(2L-1S)
Anthropological Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine

Explores the effects of post-soviet transition in today's Ukraine on the lives, identities and practices of its people. The emphasis is placed on how ethnography - a key research tool of anthropologists - helps to account for the changes the Ukrainian society has undergone since the late 1980s.

Formerly: ANTH 298.3 Special Topics: Anthropological Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine.
Prerequisite(s): A 100-level course in the social sciences.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 298.3 Special Topics: Anthropological Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 235.3 — 1/2(3L)
Anthropological Approaches to Ethnicity and Ethnic Groups

Introduction and assessment of various anthropological approaches to the study of ethnicity and ethnic groups in a cross-cultural comparative framework.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or completion of 30 credit units at the university level including a 100-level social science course.


ANTH 236.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ethnicity in Action Ukrainian Canadian Experience

This course introduces students to Ukrainian Canadian culture and ethnicity from the perspective of ethnic and diaspora studies. Examining cultural practices and heritage of Ukrainians in Canada, we will look at Ukrainian Canadian community development and early settlers’ spiritual and material culture. We will discuss major social cultural changes in the community life of Ukrainian Canadians as they were taking place throughout the last century and place those in broader historical context. To deal with the questions of cultural vitality, continuity and change, we will look at Ukrainian Canadian folklore and ‘high’ art as cultural practice and analyze the relationship between cultural heritage, cultural practice, and ethnic identity of Ukrainians in Canada.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111; or 30 credit units of university courses including 3 credit units from 100-level ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST


ANTH 240.3 — 1/2(3L)
Cultural Landscapes and Environments

This course examines the cultural construction of landscapes, as well as of built and social environments, through a series of topical readings focusing on historical, archaeological, literary, and ethnographic understandings: predominantly of western North American environments, as these places have been known by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or permission of instructor.
Note: Not open to students with credit in ANTH 498.3(02): Anthropological Perspectives on Space and Place (2009).


ANTH 244.3 — 1/2(3L)
Political Ecology Anthropology and Global Environmental Issues

Taking a political ecology approach drawn from anthropology, cross-cultural examples, and other disciplines, the course examines the impact of major 20th. and 21st. Century economic and technological developments upon peoples and environments. The focus is upon indigenous nations, farming, peasant, and other local communities in cross-cultural and global perspective. A core emphasis is on environmental crises (chronic and acute), often associated with asymmetrical power relations, and socio-cultural responses to them, especially in the form of movements of resistance, protest, and reform. Political ecology blends the insights of a unified political economic approach in the social sciences with cultural and human ecologies as well as a mixture of biological and social ecological sciences. The course also explores sustainable futures through this paradigm.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or ARCH 112 or successful completion of 30 credit units of university study.
Note: Students who have taken ANTH 298 (Special Topics): Political Ecology, Anthropology and Contemporary Environmental Issues may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ANTH 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

ANTH 302.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Practice of Ethnography

This course will examine the practice of ethnography by integrating a discussion of ethnographic research methods with training in the critical reading of ethnography and skills development in writing ethnography. Specific techniques will be explored, with an emphasis on qualitative approaches. The relationship of ethnographic theory and methodology will be highlighted.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or permission of instructor.
Note: Students who have credit for ANTH 430 may not take ANTH 302 for credit.


ANTH 310.3 — 1/2(3S)
Anthropology of Gender

Introduces students to the anthropological approaches to gender, looking specifically at the gendered norms of collective behaviours and identities. The course centers on two questions: How is gender understood in different cultural contexts? What are the processes by which people learn to identify themselves as gendered and sexual citizens?

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or WGST 112 or permission of instructor.


ANTH 311.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Anthropology

Coverage of specialized areas of anthropological and/or ethnographic analysis.

Permission of instructor is required.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


ANTH 321.3 — 1/2(3L)
Myth Ritual and Symbol

Critically examines various approaches to the study of religion and religious symbolism. Different ways on interpreting myth, ritual, and symbol are considered through a survey of the works of both early social scientists and contemporary scholars. The role of symbols and rituals in social communication is examined.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level ANTH or permission of instructor.


ANTH 326.3 — 1/2(3L)
Applied Anthropology

Applications of anthropological concepts to contemporary cultural and social issues. There is a focus on anthropology as a policy science including research and non-academic practice. Applied methods and domains are emphasized, including needs and social impact assessment, program evaluation, rapid assessment, participatory-action, and advocacy. Discussion focuses on anthropological contributions to community and economic development, environmental impact and sustainability, business and industry, cultural and natural resource management, education, immigration, Indigenous issues, technology transfers, and health.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level ANTH or permission of instructor.


ANTH 328.3 — 1/2(3L)
Political and Legal Anthropology

Analytical and comparative examination of anthropological approaches to the study of political and legal structures and processes. Sources of conflict resolution and the relationships among politics, law, and religion are explored from a cross-cultural and comparative framework.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level ANTH or permission of instructor.


ANTH 329.3 — 1/2(3L)
Environmental Anthropology

Examines the variety of cultural adaptations that both large-scale and small-scale societies make to local and, increasingly, global environments. Illustrates how the principals of general ecology apply to humans in their environmental relations, while also applying ethnographic perspectives to new political manifestations of environmentalism.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level ANTH or permission of instructor.


ANTH 330.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Oral History and Storytelling Anthropological Perspectives

Offers an anthropological perspective on stories and storytelling events, their meanings, interpretations, and applications. Drawing on a wealth of scholarship generated by folklorists, anthropologists and oral historians, students will examine current theories and principles of oral historical research and consider the implications of storytelling and oral narrative in modern societies.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level ANTH or permission of instructor.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 398 Special Topics: Oral History and Storytelling may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 332.3 — 1/2(3L)
Anthropology of Contagion and Infectious Disease Critical Gender and Race Perspectives

Examines the ways in which infectious diseases and agents of contagion are represented in public culture, and experienced in different ways individually and collectively. Students have the opportunity to apply gender- and race- based critiques to the understandings of major epidemic diseases, including HIV/AIDS.

Formerly: WGST 353.
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or WGST 112 or permission of instructor.
Note: Students with credit for WGST 353 may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 339.3 — 1/2(3L)
Cultural Change, Globalization and Development

Surveys anthropological theories that relate to change, from classical ones (such as neo-evolutionism, acculturation and assimilation, innovation, and diffusion) through more contemporary approaches to urbanization, social movements and networks, development, and globalization, to complexity and emergence theories. The tensions between the capacity for people to direct their futures and the limiting of external determinants are discussed through this course.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level ANTH or permission of instructor.


ANTH 354.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
Ritual Spaces in Ukrainian Culture

By applying ritual and symbolic analysis to the study of culture, this course investigates selected sites of Ukrainian traditional and contemporary culture in which ritual plays a prominent role. A comparative perspective is applied with the objective to better comprehend complex processes of cultural continuity and change in Eastern Europe and multiethnic Canada.

Formerly: ANTH 398.3 Special Topics: Ritual Spaces in Ukrainian Culture.
Prerequisite(s): Any ANTH course numbered 200 to 235 or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 398.3 Special Topics: Ritual Spaces in Ukrainian Culture may not take this course for credit .


ANTH 379.3
Washington Center Topics in Anthropology

Covers topics in Anthropology, offered by the Washington Center, Washington D.C. Possible topics include Peace and Social Justice, International Human Rights, Public Policies and Empowerment Strategies that Reduce Hunger and Poverty or other topics approved by the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology.

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units of university level study including 6 credit units senior ANTH.
Note: Registration in this course is restricted to students selected for the Washington Center Term Abroad program.


ANTH 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ANTH 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ANTH 401.3 — 1/2
Independent Research in Anthropology

Students will undertake a project involving original research or a review essay under the direction of a faculty member. An oral presentation and written report submitted at the end of the project will be evaluated by a faculty committee. Topics are open within the field of Anthropology, subject to the availability of a faculty advisor. An outline of the project must be submitted to the course coordinator in the term preceding registration and be approved before Departmental permission will be granted.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Honours program in Anthropology; ANTH 302.3; and permission of the department.


ANTH 403.3 — 1/2(3S)
Anthropology of Healing

This course exposes students to critical anthropological perspectives on the concepts of healing, health, and well-being. Emphasis is placed on understanding the meaning of healing in cultural context, and on the cultural bases of psychosocial, medical, restorative, and transformational therapeutic processes.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of 300 level ANTH, or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students who have taken ANTH 498 (Special Topics): Anthropology of Healing may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 405.3 — 1/2(3S)
Anthropology of Disaster and Disruption

This seminar course explores anthropological approaches to the human experience of disaster, disruption, and dislocation. Adopting perspectives primarily from medical and environmental anthropology, the course examines social and cultural responses to natural and human-made disasters, forced resettlement, and other forms of population disruption.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 300-level ANTH or permission of instructor.
Note: Students who have received credit for ANTH 498.3: Anthropology of Disaster and Disruption may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 421.3 — 1/2(3L)
Anthropology in Time: Early Influences

This course provides a historical survey of the evolution of basic concepts and theories in anthropological thought and practice. The development of the field of anthropology is examined by a review of foundational perspectives on the nature of human culture, thought, behavior and experience in relation to its natural and social environment, covering a range of ideas from early philosophical views to mid-twentieth century social and philosophical schools of thought.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 300-level ANTH or permission of instructor.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 420 cannot take this course for credit.


ANTH 422.3 — 1/2(3L)
Anthropology in Context: Contemporary Influences

This course consists of a broad survey of the development of contemporary concepts and theories in anthropology and related fields. Special emphasis will be given to the evolution of such terms and ideas as ethnography, culture, subjectivity, and the shifting models of the relationship individual and group in contemporary theory.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 300-level ANTH or permission of instructor.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 420 may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ANTH 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ANTH 801.3 — 1/2(3S)
Contemporary Anthropological Theory

Will survey and critically assess the works of major contributors to Anthropological theory, with an emphasis on contemporary culture theory.

Permission of the instructor required.


ANTH 802.3 — 1/2(3S)
Community-Based Research Ethnography and Engagement

This course explores strategies for community-based research and engagement, with an emphasis on the practice of ethnography.

Permission of the instructor required.


ANTH 804.3 — 1/2(3S)
Medical Anthropology

Will survey the theoretical and conceptual trends within the field of medical anthropology, spanning biocultural, clinical, ecological, political economic and critical interpretive approaches. The substantive areas of focus include reproductive health, infectious disease, disability, mental illness, health systems, and healing.

Permission of the instructor required.


ANTH 806.3 — 1/2(3S)
Culture and Environment

This course is designed to teach history, theory, and central concerns of Environmental Anthropology at an advanced level. The course covers the breadth of historical development of the sub-discipline internationally, while examining selected topics in depth through a regional focus on northern North America.

Note: Students who received credit for ANTH 898: Environmental Anthropology may not take this course for credit.
Permission of the instructor required.


ANTH 898.3 — 1/2/1&2(3R)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Permission of the instructor required.


ANTH 899.6 — 1/2/1&2(3R)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Permission of the instructor required.


ANTH 990.0 — 1/2/1&2
Seminar

During residence, all graduate students will register in and attend ANTH 990 and will make at least two presentations based on their research. Graduate students in the Anthropology program are required to attend and participate; interested undergraduate students may also be invited.

Restriction(s):Enrolment in the graduate program in Anthropology or permission of the Graduate Chair or designate.


ANTH 994 — 1/2/1&2
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

ANTH 996 — 1/2/1&2
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.