This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2015 to April 2016.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2015-2016, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

ARCH 112.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Human Journey Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

This course introduces students to the basic principles of archaeology and biological anthropology by examining human evolutionary and cultural development. The course follows the journey of humanity from our earliest bipedal ancestors, through the emergence of anatomically modern humans, to the eventual advent of agriculture and development of complex urban states.

Formerly: ANTH 112.
Note: Students with previous credit for ANTH 110 or 112 may not take this course for credit.


ARCH 116.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Near Eastern and Classical Archaeology

Introduction to the archaeology of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel and surrounding regions, Greece and Rome. The course examines how archaeologists use material remains to reconstruct ancient societies, focusing on the archaeological characteristics and cultural dynamics of major periods, and the relationship between human communities and the environment.

ARCH 244.3 — 1/2(3L)
Archaeology and Cultural Development Ancient Israel and Syria Late Bronze Age to Hellenistic Period

Examines the archaeological reconstruction of cultural development in the regions of ancient Israel and Syria from the Late Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Period, focusing on methodological issues, major sites, and the defining characteristics of the cultures themselves.

Formerly: CLAS 244
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 112 OR 116.
Note: ARCH 243 is recommended. Students with credit for CLAS 237 or 244 may not take this course for credit.


ARCH 250.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Introduction to Archaeological Science

A study of the theory, methods and techniques used by archaeologists in survey, excavation, analysis and interpretation. Emphasizes methods and techniques. Laboratory instruction will be given in the handling of archaeological material and data.

Formerly: ANTH 250.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 112 or 116.


ARCH 251.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Archaeological Interpretation

How do archaeologists reconstruct the lives of past peoples from the material remains they left behind? This course introduces the student to the methods, techniques and theoretical models used by archaeologists as they answer questions about our human past and the emergence of modern societies.

Formerly: ANTH 251.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 112 or 116.


ARCH 252.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Near Eastern Archaeological Field Work

Introduces students to the excavation and laboratory methods used in Near Eastern archaeology. Beginning with research design, the course leads students through the techniques of excavation in the field to the analysis of artifacts and data in the lab.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in Archaeology or 30 credit units at the university.


ARCH 257.3 — 1/2(3L)
Archaeology of Ancient Egypt

A study of the archaeological evidence for the reconstruction of ancient Egyptian culture from the Neolithic through to the Roman periods, focusing on the particular characteristics of archaeology in Egypt, major cultural periods, and significant sites.

Formerly: ANTH 257.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 112 or 116.


ARCH 258.3 — 1/2(3L)
Archaeology of Ancient Mesopotamia

A study of the archaeological evidence for the development of the cultures of ancient Mesopotamia from the Neolithic through to the Persian periods, focusing on the particular characteristics of Mesopotamian archaeology, major cultural periods, significant sites, and the relation of urban centres to the surrounding regions.

Formerly: ANTH 258.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 112 or 116.


ARCH 270.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Human Evolution

An introductory overview of human biology including the background for evolutionary biology, and the evolution, structure, and function of certain primate patterns.

Formerly: ANTH 270.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 112 or (BIOL 120 and 121).
Note: BIOL 120 and 121 is strongly recommended. It is expected that students will have had Biology 30 with a laboratory, or BIOL 107.


ARCH 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

ARCH 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

ARCH 300.3 — 1/2(3R)
Reading Course

Supervised reading courses in a particular aspect of one of the branches of anthropology not offered in lecture form in this department. A detailed reading program will be designed on an individual basis and will be guided by regular consultation with one or more faculty members. The student is required to prepare a comprehensive proposal for approval by the Head of the Department and make arrangements with a professor to supervise the course. Students must discuss the project with the Department Head before registration.

ARCH 301.3 — 1/2(3R)
Reading Course

Supervised reading courses in a particular aspect of one of the branches of anthropology not offered in lecture form in this department. A detailed reading program will be designed on an individual basis and will be guided by regular consultation with one or more faculty members. The student is required to prepare a comprehensive proposal for approval by the Head of the Department and make arrangements with a professor to supervise the course. Students must discuss the project with the Department Head before registration.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 24 undergraduate anthropology/archaeology credit units.
Note: Not more than 3 credit units will be allowed for calculation of honours standing or scholarship recommendation. These courses are not available for graduate credit.


ARCH 330.3 — 1/2(1L-2S)
The Archaeology of Human Environmental Impact

This course illustrates how humans have been an integral and active component of earth’s ecology for many thousands of years. This history of interaction between humans and their environments has had both deleterious and positive impacts, for us and other species. By studying how humans impacted their environments in the past, we gain a better appreciation of the potential effects of our own activities and their environmental consequences. Many of the processes affecting the planet today are rooted in our past, as many of the actions we see today were produced by and had impacts upon past societies. Similarly, past societies were forced to deal with the effects of climate change, a problem with which our current society is struggling. A better understanding of how these situations arose in the past may help us to better discern general principles that continue to operate today, and thus plan toward our future.

Prerequisite(s):ARCH 250 or ARCH 251 or permission of the instructor
Note:Students with credit for ARCH 398 Special Topics: The Archaeology of Human Environmental Impact may not take this course for credit.


ARCH 344.3 — 1/2(3L)
Archaeology of Gender

Gender archaeology has been an important aspect of the discipline for almost thirty years. While its earliest practitioners focused on the absence of women in interpretations of past cultures and barriers to women archaeologists in our own culture, gender-oriented approaches to archaeology have expanded to look at feminist approaches to disseminating archaeological information, methodological advances in identifying gendered persons in the archaeological record, theoretical discussions of the relationship between gender and material culture, and archaeological efforts to look at other neglected categories of identity. This course examines all these topics with particular attention to how gender has been integrated into interpretations of human evolution; bioarchaeological and mortuary data; food and craft production; spatial organization of activities and settlements; and historical archaeology. It will also give special consideration to recent efforts to expand gender archaeology beyond women to masculinist and queer perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250 or 251 or permission of the instructor.


ARCH 350.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Boreal Forest Archaeology

An introduction to the archaeology of the boreal forest region stretching from Quebec to the northern prairie provinces, and including southern Keewatin and adjacent southeastern Mackenzie. The archaeological cultures will be discussed in detail and the methodological and theoretical approaches to the archaeology of this region.

Formerly: ANTH 350.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250 or 251.


ARCH 352.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Historical Archaeology

Study of the method and theory of historical archaeology in North America with emphasis on recent developments in the field. Topics include critical use of documentary sources, historic artifact and faunal analyses, pattern recognition, frontier archaeology and others will be explored.

Formerly: ANTH 352.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250 or 251.


ARCH 353.3 — 1/2(3L)
Plains Archaeology

A survey of the prehistory of the Plains region of North America with emphasis on the recognition and examination of archaeological problems.

Formerly: ANTH 353.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250 or 251.


ARCH 354.3 — 1(3L)
The Archaeology of Culture Contact

Examines the nature and consequences of early contacts between indigenous peoples and Europeans by utilizing the archaeological record, supplemented by ethnohistorical and historical sources. The primary focus will be North America north of Mexico with comparative case studies from interactions in South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250 or 251.


ARCH 356.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
Development of Complex Cultures in Eastern Mediterranean and Near Eastern Regions

A study of the development of complex cultures in the eastern Mediterranean and Near Eastern regions from the hunting and gathering societies of the Upper Palaeolithic period to the establishment of complex urban cultures during the Early Bronze Age, with an emphasis on the geographical areas of ancient Syria and Israel.

Formerly: ANTH 356
Prerequisite(s): One of ARCH 243, 244, 250 or 251.


ARCH 357.3 — 1(3L)
The Archaeology of Prairie Settlement

Based largely on evidence gained from the archaeological record supplemented by input from history, cultural geography and other disciplines, this course will give students the opportunity to explore the ways in which people have adapted to the challenges of living in the prairie environment. Topics such as the archaeological evidence of spatial patterning of settlements, social context of built environment, use and organization of space, gender, ethnicity and the material culture of settlement will be examined. Case studies dealing with the archaeology of indigenous settlement on the plains, the fur trade, Metis, ranching era and homestead era as well as others will form the focus of discussion.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250 or ARCH 251 or permission of the instructor.


ARCH 360.3 — 1/2(3L)
Archaeological Resource Management

This course provides a theoretical and methodological introduction to the management and conservation of archaeological sites and materials. We will examine the various facets of cultural resource management on international, national and provincial levels with detailed examination of regulations, procedures, realities and weaknesses of what is essentially applied archaeology in western Canada. Important developments within CRM including increasing involvement of First Nations and the Duty to Consult; concerns regarding sacred objects, sites, and landscapes; human remains; professional ethics; conservation of sites and curation of collections and other topics will be addressed.

Formerly: ANTH 360.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250 or 251.


ARCH 361.6 — SP&SU(60P)
Archaeological Field Methods

Six weeks of field experience in archaeological research techniques including site survey, excavation, and laboratory analysis. The field location will depend on areas of departmental projects. Offered only in Spring and Summer Session.

Formerly: ANTH 361.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250 or 251.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 261 may not take this course for credit.


ARCH 383.3 — 1/2(1T-80P)
Career Internship in Cultural Resource Management

Designed to provide students with an opportunity to participate first-hand in cultural resource management and regulation, including such activities as site inventory, recording and impact mitigation practices, data management and (if done in conjunction with the provincial Heritage Branch) site inventory management, land development screening, impact assessment review and compliance and possible experience in legislative review and First Nations initiatives. Work experience in the museum context of artifact conservation may also be available.

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units at the university level including Arch 360.3
Note:Requires 80 hours in total.


ARCH 385.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Computer Applications in Archaeology

Explores the interaction between archaeological theory, excavation methods, and modes of analysis, and various computer applications, such as databases, computer assisted mapping and drawing programs, and geographic information systems utilized in archaeological research.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250, 251 and an additional 6 credit units of archaeology at the 200/300 level or permission of the department.


ARCH 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ARCH 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ARCH 403.3 — 2(4P-.5T)
Analysis and Public Exhibition of Cultural Artifacts

Independent study of a particular cultural artifact or artifact type, culminating in the public presentation of an exhibit in the Museum of Antiquities. Includes practical experience as a volunteer in the Museum.

Permission of the head of ARCH and ANTH required.
Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units at the university.
Note: Students with credit for CMRS 403 cannot take this course for credit.


ARCH 452.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Archaeology

Formerly: ANTH 452.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 251 and 3 credit units in senior archaeology.


ARCH 457.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Prehistoric Pottery Technology

A broad perspective on prehistoric pottery including the nature of clays, pottery production and use, the physical properties of pottery and pottery assemblages on the Canadian plains and adjacent boreal forest.

Formerly: ANTH 457.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 251 or 250 and a 300-level archaeology course.


ARCH 458.6 — 1&2(3L)
Zooarchaeology

The identification of vertebrate faunal remains from archaeological sites including an examination of interpretive procedures and quantitative methods.

Formerly: ANTH 458.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 470 or BIOL 351 or 361.


ARCH 459.3 — (3L-2P)
Geoarchaeology

Deals with the basic components of geoarchaeology including: stratigraphy, site formation processes, and landscape reconstruction. Various methods used in paleoenvironmental reconstruction are also discussed focusing on the late Quaternary of North America.

Prerequisite(s): GEOL 121, 122, and ARCH 250.
Note: GEOL 247 is recommended. There will be costs additional to tuition fees.


ARCH 462.3 — 1/2(3L)
Contemporary Archaeological Theory

Detailed survey of the basic concepts and schools of thought in contemporary archaeology considered on a world-wide basis, with emphasis on Canada and the United States. Theoretical models relating to culture history, settlement, ecological and other approaches are discussed.

Formerly: ANTH 462.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 251 and 3 senior credit units in archaeology.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 451 may not take this course for credit.


ARCH 465.3 — 1/2(3L)
Spatial Analysis of Archaeological Data

Spatial analysis examines the distribution of artifacts, ecofacts and features in the archaeological record and assesses the extent to which the distribution reflects past human activity, social structures, etc. Familiarizes students with theories of spatial analysis and provides practical experience in applying these theories to archaeological data.

Formerly: ANTH 465.
Prerequisite(s): A 300-level course in archaeology or ARCH 243 or 244.


ARCH 470.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Human Osteology

A comprehensive investigation of the human skeleton. Primary emphasis involves preparing students for archaeological fieldwork and advanced research in biological anthropology.

Formerly: ANTH 470.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 270.


ARCH 471.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Forensic Anthropology

Concerned with the analysis of human skeletal materials and specifically the identification of age, sex, stature, race and other features. Laboratory sessions supplement lectures.

Formerly: ANTH 471.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 470.


ARCH 472.3 — 1/2(L)
Palaeopathology

The diagnosis and interpretation of disease in antiquity and the overall health status of earlier human populations. Although skeletal pathology will be emphasized, analysis of mummified tissues and ancient DNA will be included.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 470.


ARCH 475.3 — 1/2(3L)
Bioarchaeology

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological contexts in order to reconstruct past lifeways. In this course, students will become familiar with the history and development of bioarchaeology, the nature and recovery of ancient human remains, and the various applications and interpretive frameworks employed by bioarchaeologists. Course material will be contextualize within some of the broader sociocultural and political processes that have characterized more recent human history.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 270 or permission of instructor


ARCH 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ARCH 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ARCH 805.3 — 1/2(3S)
Core Seminar in Archaeological Method and Theory

Seminars based on a series of readings dealing with the development of archaeological theory. Special emphasis will be given to anthropological archaeology and contemporary explanatory models.

Restriction: Enrolment in the Archaeology Graduate Program.


ARCH 852.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Historical Archaeology

Readings and discussions of the major theoretical developments and research orientations within contemporary Historical Archaeology.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 352 or equivalent.
Permission of the instructor required.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Archaeology Graduate Program.


ARCH 853.3 — 1/2(3S)
Graduate Seminar in Plains Archaeology

Deals with the prehistory of the Northern Plains with an emphasis on current issues and problem-solving.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 353; or equivalent.
Permission of the instructor required.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Archaeology Graduate Program.


ARCH 855.3 — 1/2(3S)
Problems in Archaeology

Research on a selected problem in archaeology or the prehistory of a selected geographic area with a problem orientation. The subject will be examined by the class as a group and in detail through conferences, readings and laboratory work. A comprehensive report will be prepared by the class.

Permission of the instructor required.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Archaeology Graduate Program.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


ARCH 856.3 — 1/2(3S)
Graduate Seminar in Fur Trade Archaeology

Readings and discussions on the comparative methods, theoretical approaches and interpretations within archaeology of the North American interior fur trade.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 352 or permission of the instructor.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Archaeology Graduate Program.


ARCH 858.3 — 1&2(3S&2L)
Zooarchaeology

A reading course in method and theory relating to the identification and interpretation of faunal materials from archaeological sites. A practicum involving actual faunal assemblages is included.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 458. Students may take this course concurrently.
Permission of the instructor required.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Department of Archaeology Graduate Program.


ARCH 875.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Bioarchaeology

Bioarchaeology, the study of human remains from archaeological sites, focuses on the excavation and analyses of (predominately) human skeletal and dental remains in order to gain insight into past life ways. Bioarchaeological topics include taphonomy, paleodemography, paleopathology, and physiological stress, activity and behaviour, growth and development, and even variation and human agency within social and political contexts. The breadth and focus of this course may vary from year to year, depending on the circumstances and backgrounds of the students enrolled.

B>Prerequisite(s):ARCH 470 or permission of the instructor.
B>Note: Students with credit for ARCH 870 will not receive credit for this course.


ARCH 898.3 — 1/2/1&2(3R)
Special Topics

Guided reading and discussion courses to permit advanced students to follow intensive library research into special aspects of archaeology.

Permission of the instructor required.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Archaeology Graduate Program.


ARCH 899.6 — 1/2/1&2(3R)
Special Topics

Guided reading and discussion courses to permit advanced students to follow intensive library research into special aspects of archaeology.

Permission of the instructor required.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Archaeology Graduate Program.


ARCH 990.0 — 1/2/1&2
Seminar

During residence, all graduate students will register in ARCH 990 and will present at least one paper based on their own research. Graduate students are required to attend and interested undergraduate students may be invited to attend.

Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Archaeology Graduate Program or permission of the Graduate Chair or designate.


ARCH 994 — 1/2/1&2
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

ARCH 996 — 1/2/1&2
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.