This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

ARTH 120.3 — 1(3L)
Art and Visual Culture I

This introductory class explores the production, dissemination and consumption of art, architecture and visual culture up to and including the 1600s. In a series of case studies drawn from differing cultures and geographies both local and global, it will consider a range of questions including: What is the role of the artist, builder and designer in society? What are the media, genres and contexts for communicating thought, and how and when do they engage in cultural, social and political action (if they do)? What does it take for art and visual culture to open up a space for relating to the world we live in, differently? How does the study of art, architecture and visual culture from the past generate curiosity, expand understandings, and ask new questions, in the present moment? This class will engage with these and other demanding questions.

Note: Students with credit for ART 110 or ART 120 may not take this course for credit.


ARTH 121.3 — 2(3L)
Art and Visual Culture II

This introductory class explores the production, dissemination and consumption of art, architecture and visual culture from the 1700s to the present day. In a series of case studies drawn from differing cultures and geographies both local and global, it will consider a range of questions including: What is the role of the artist, architect and visual culture in society? What are the media, genres and contexts for communicating thought, and how and when do they engage in cultural, social and political action (if they do)? What does it take for art and visual culture to open up a space for relating to the world we live in, differently? How does the study of art, architecture and visual culture (past and present) generate curiosity, expand understandings, and ask new questions, in the present moment? This class will engage with these and other demanding questions.

Note: Students with credit for ART 110 or ART 121 may not take this course for credit.


ARTH 250.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Visual Culture

In a series of case studies, this class will explore a wide range of visual media including painting, photography, digital imaging, the internet, video, advertising, cinema, television and architecture to ask how and why visual technologies have become so central to contemporary everyday life.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121; or 6 credit units in Art History, Studio Art or cognate courses; or permission of the department.
Note: This course is not offered every year.


ARTH 251.3 — 1/2(3L)
Art of the Internet

The computer was originally designed for numerical calculations, computer networks for communication between academic researchers, and video games for light-hearted entertainment. In this class we examine how artists have used, hacked, modded, and otherwise subverted these and other digital technologies as part of their artistic practice.

Prerequisite(s):ARTH 120 or ARTH 121.


ARTH 253.3 — 1/2(3L)
Aboriginal Art History I

An introductory survey of Aboriginal art history within the Canadian regions of the West Coast, Plateau, Western Sub-Arctic and Arctic.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units ARTH or Aboriginal cognate course: INDG; IPJP; ANTH 224.3; ARCH 353.3, ARCH 454.3, ARCH 457.3; ENG 242.3, ENG 335.3, ENG 338.3; HIST 264.3, HIST 265.3, HIST 266.3, HIST 482.3; POLS 222.3, POLS 322.3, POLS 323.3, POLS 422.3; SOC 219.3, SOC 319.3, SOC 341.3; OR other course on Aboriginal peoples approved by the course instructor.
Note: This course is not offered every year.


ARTH 255.3 — 1/2(3L)
Aboriginal Art History II

An introductory survey of Aboriginal art history within the Canadian regions of the Plains, Woodlands, Eastern Sub-Arctic and East Coast.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120, ARTH 121, or ARTH 253.


ARTH 256.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Canadian Art and Architecture I

A survey course which reflects the great change in Canadian Art and Architecture from ancient aboriginal art to the origins of modernism in the late 19th Century. In this class we will consider the major accomplishments of pre-European art, Colonial Art and Architecture and the growing maturity of 19th Century cultural production. The art and architecture of Canada will be considered from the perspective of both particular outgrowth of this place as well as sharing similarity with the cultural forms of neighboring communities and imperial centres of production. The emergence in Canada of centres of artistic and craft production, cultural institutions and art and professional organizations will also be looked at.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.


ARTH 257.3 — 1&2(3L/S)
Introduction to Canadian Art and Architecture II

A survey course which reflects developments in Canadian Art and Architecture from the closing years of the 19th Century through to the present day. In this course we will consider the major movements in Canadian Art as well as significant contributors and social factors, (race, religion, gender, class), which have influenced art of this period.

Formerly: ART 257
Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121, or a course in the areas of fine arts or humanities.
Note: Students with credit for ART 257 will not receive credit for this course.


ARTH 260.3 — 1/2(3L/S)
History and Theory of European Architecture 1400 to 1700

An introduction to the architecture of the European states and their colonies 1400 to 1700. The institutional, geographic and social locations of architectural production will be studied. Issues of power, nationalism, and class will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.
Note: Students with credit for ART 260 or ART 262 may not take this course for credit. This course is not offered every year.


ARTH 261.3 — 1/2(3L/S)
History and Theory of European Architecture 1700 to 1900

An introduction to the architecture of the European states and their colonies 1700 to 1900. The institutional, geographic and social locations of architectural production will be studied. Issues of power, nationalism, and class will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.
Note: Students with credit for ART 261 or ART 262 may not take this course for credit.


ARTH 298.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

ARTH 299.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

ARTH 308.3 — 1/2(3L)
Art of High Renaissance and Reformation Era 1500 to 1550

The High Renaissance, Mannerism, and other trends in European painting and sculpture will be considered in the context of the Reformation; special emphasis will be placed upon Raphael, Michelangelo, and Dürer.

Formerly: ART 306
Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.
Note: Students with credit for ART 306 or ART 308 will not receive credit for this course.


ARTH 309.3 — 1/2(3L)
Art of Late Renaissance 1550 to 1600

Artistic trends in the second half of the 16th century will be considered in the context of the Council of Trent; special emphasis will be placed upon Late Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese, and the painters of the Medicean Studiolo.

Formerly: ART 306
Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.
Note: Students with credit for ART 306 or ART 309 will not receive credit for this course.


ARTH 318.3
Exhibition Technique The Social Construction of Art

Exhibition Technique addresses the evolving network of social and historical relations that generate multiple and increasingly hybrid meanings in the production and reception of art. When Brian O'Doherty coined the critical term white cube in the 1970s, artists were already paying attention to the circumstances in which their work was presented. The situation of an artistic gesture is the subject of this inquiry. Who does an artwork call on to secure its meanings – what are its aesthetic allegiances and precedents? How do institutional structures, political currents and popular trends inform the significance of aesthetic work? What is the role of patrons? Who are the curators? What use is the canon?

Prerequisite(s):ARTH 120 and ARTH 121
Note:This course is offered for Art History credit but students may opt to use this for Studio credit should they so choose (with selected difference in evaluation criteria).


ARTH 323.3 — 1/2(3S)
European Colonialism in Visual Arts 1880 to 1920

Examines how visual culture played a central role in legitimizing European colonial expansion of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Photography, painting, popular prints, postcards, world fairs, and the urban planning of colonial cities will be studied. Anti-colonial resistance will also be examined.

Formerly: ART 323
Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.
Note: Students with credit for ART 323 will not receive credit for this course.


ARTH 324.3 — 1/2(3L/S)
Early 20th Century Studies in Art and Architecture 1900 to 1918

A study of visual culture and architecture in Europe and North America from 1900 to the end of World War I. Issues concerning art institutions, gender, class and the impact of modernism will be studied.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.
Note: Students with credit for ART 320 or ART 324 may not take this course for credit.


ARTH 325.3 — 1/2(3L/S)
Early 20th Century Studies in Art and Architecture 1918 to 1940

A study of visual culture and architecture in Europe and North America from 1918 to World War II. Issues concerning art institutions, nationalism, gender, class and the impact of modernism will be studied.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.
Note: Students with credit for ART 320 or ART 325 may not take this course for credit.


ARTH 328.3 — 1/2(3L/S)
Studies in Photographic History 1920 to Present

An introduction to the study of photography from 1920 to current practices. Areas include recent critical debates, commercial production and the impact of new technologies. Special emphasis will be placed on photography in a Canadian context.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.
Note: Students with credit for ART 321 or ART 328 may not take this course for credit. This course is not offered every year.


ARTH 329.3 — 1/2(3L)
Imagining the City

How do artists, filmmakers, architects, urban planners and thinkers imagine their urban spaces? What determines their point of view in the cities in which they live? How do they represent their urban imaginaries as contested, multiple and constantly mutating, from Mexico City to Havana, Barcelona to Saskatoon, Johannesburg to Paris and London, etc.? This course will engage critically with these and other demanding questions. Materials to be examined may include painting, photography, architecture, cultural theory, film, new media, popular culture, performance, sculpture, installation art, graffiti and fashion.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of Humanities, Fine Arts, or Social Sciences, or permission of the department.


ARTH 340.3 — 1(3L)
Contemporary Performance Art Theory and Praxis

What is performance art? How does live art and radical politics intersect, connect or collide? What makes a performance radical or political? Is performance art only about these elements? Which cultural theories must be adapted or discarded in the practice of radical and political performance art practice? What are the conditions through which radical performance art can thrive? This class will allow students to engage critically with these demanding questions.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120.3 and 121.3.
Note: This course may be used towards either studio or Art history degree requirements.


ARTH 345.3 — 1/2(3L)
Saskatchewan Aboriginal Art History

A survey/seminar course that reviews the art history of Aboriginal peoples of Saskatchewan from the Artefact (pre-1700s), Transitional (1700-1900), to Modern-Contemporary (1900-today) periods. Works to be examined include rock art, architecture, pottery, pipes, shields, drums, painted robes, clothing, moccasins, bags, and mix-media Modern-Contemporary works. The design and subject matter of Aboriginal art are discussed within its specific cultural context of the time period, which includes values and beliefs associated with land, spirituality, mythology, and the influence of significant historical and social transitions. Course content will be reviewed through power point presentations, videos, group discussions and possibly, gallery/ museum field trips and guest artists.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of ARTH or 3 credit units in Native Studies or Aboriginal courses from NS; IPJP; ANTH 224.3; ARCH 353.3, 454.3, 457.3; HIST 264.3, 265.3, 266.3, 482.3; POLS 222.3, 322.3, 323.3, 422.3; SOC 219.3, 319.3, 341.3; EIND 380.3, 450.3.


ARTH 355.3 — 1/2(3L)
Contemporary Aboriginal Art I

This seminar will examine contemporary Aboriginal art, from the mid to late 1900s. Emphasis will be on Canadian artists.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units from ARTH 120, ARTH 121, ARTH 253, or ARTH 255.
Note: This course is not offered every year.


ARTH 358.3 — 2(3L)
Postmodernism in Art

What is the postmodern project? What constitutes the postmodern in art? How have artists articulated the condition of postmodernity across the categories of nation, gender, race, sexuality and globalization? This course will engage critically with these and other demanding questions. Materials to be examined include painting photography, architecture, cultural theory, film, new media, popular culture, performance, sculpture, installation art and fashion.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121.


ARTH 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ARTH 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

ARTH 418.3 — 1&2(3S)
Studies in Contemporary Art

A survey of contemporary international art which includes film, video, performance, as well as more traditional media.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120 and 121 and a second or third-year course in art history.
Note: Students with credit for ART 418 or ART 420 will not receive credit for this course.


ARTH 420.3 — 2(3L/S)
Professional Practices in the History of Art and Visual Culture

For senior students who are interested in practical professional practice experience in careers related to the study of the history of art and visual culture. The course will be divided into four components focusing on careers in Academe: Commercial and Public Gallery management; Architecture; and Collections and Curatorship. Each of these areas of study will be facilitated through seminars, workshops, site visits, invited speakers and assigned projects.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 120, 121, at least two senior Art History courses, and/or permission of the instructor.


ARTH 455.3 — 2(3L/S)
Contemporary Aboriginal Art II

This seminar will examine contemporary Aboriginal art, from the late 1900s to the present day. Emphasis will be on Canadian artists.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units from ARTH 120, ARTH 121, ARTH 253, ARTH 255, ARTH 355.


ARTH 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

ARTH 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

ARTH 898.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by regular and visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in this course should contact the department for more information.

ARTH 899.6 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by regular and visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in this course should contact the department for more information.

ARTH 994
Research

Students writing an M.A. thesis must register for this course.