This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

BIOC 300.3 — 1(3L)
Information Transfer DNA to Proteins

Deals with the structure and function of nucleic acids at an advanced level. Chromosome anatomy, DNA replication, transcription of genes, and translation of mRNA in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes are covered. The various mechanisms whereby gene expression is regulated are also discussed.

Formerly: BIOC 230.
Prerequisite(s): BMSC 220.
Note: Students with credit for BIOC 230 and 334 cannot take this course for credit.


BIOC 310.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Proteins and Enzymes

The properties of proteins and enzymes will be described including structure, kinetics, regulation and modification, antibodies, membrane proteins and glycosylation. Laboratories will provide experience with the determination of structural and functional properties including: ultracentrifugation, chromatography, electrophoresis, kinetics, phosphoamino acid identification, Western blotting, computer-based sequence analysis via the Internet.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 240.3 and CHEM 250.3.
Note: Students with credit for BIOC 341 or BIOC 429 cannot take this course for credit.


BIOC 311.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Introductory Molecular Biology

Basic principles and techniques of nucleic acid manipulations used in molecular biology and biotechnology are presented. Information and practical experience with plasmids, restriction endonucleases, PCR, DNA sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, cloning, hybridization, analysis of RNA and gene promoters, and protein over-expression are presented. The laboratory component will also include an Internet exercise.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 240.3, CHEM 250.3, and one of BMSC 220.3 or BIOL 226.3.
Note: Students with credit for MCIM 391.3 (formerly MICR 391.3), MICR 395, or BIOC 341 may not take this course for credit.


BIOC 405.3 — 2(3L)
Structure and Function of Biomolecules

This is a lecture-based course that will focus on the advanced principles of protein structure, stability and biological function. In addition, techniques used to study protein structure will be introduced and illustrated with practical examples and problems.

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 310.3.
Note(s): Students with credit for BMST 305 will not receive credit for BIOC 405. This course was labeled BMST 305 until 2013.


BIOC 412.3 — 2(3L)
Protein Structure Function and Engineering

The details of protein structure, domains, folding and targeting, and modern experimental approaches to protein engineering will be presented. The inter-relationship between structure and function in enzyme/protein mechanism and regulation shall be stressed.

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 310 and CHEM 250.
Note: Students with credit for BIOC 334 cannot take this course for credit.


BIOC 420.3 — 2(3L)
Advanced Plant Biochemistry

Examines topics in plant biochemistry including metabolic and developmental integration, plant interaction with the environment, cell wall biosynthesis, regulation of cell division, synthesis of hormones and elicitor molecules, natural product biochemistry and secondary metabolites, senescence and programmed cell death and plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 240 or BMSC 200, BMSC 230 and CHEM 250 or permission of the Instructor.
Note: Students with credit for BIOC 433 cannot take this course for credit. Offered in the academic year 2012/2013 and alternate years thereafter (2014/2015, etc.).


BIOC 430.3 — 1(3L)
Biochemistry of Cancer

This course provides current knowledge of the biochemical and clinical aspects of human cancer. The course will focus on the importance of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and other topics such as tumor formation and metastasis, apoptosis, cancer epigenetics, signal transduction mechanisms, and drug resistance, drug development, and biochemical and clinical importance of tumor models.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 230, BMSC 240 and CHEM 250.
Note: Offered in the academic year 2013/2014 and alternate years thereafter (2015/2016, etc.).


BIOC 435.3 — 1(3L)
Human Metabolism and Disease

Metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms to produce energy and substrates that are necessary to sustain life. This course will explore cellular and organismal metabolism with a focus on the relationships between key metabolic pathways and genetic and acquired human diseases. Topics will include diabetes and obesity as well as other diseases of amino acid, carbohydrate, lipid and vitamin/cofactor metabolism.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 230 and CHEM 250.


BIOC 436.3 — 2(3L)
Advanced Molecular Biology

Modern and advanced methods and strategies of nucleic acid manipulation, and characterization of genes in cells and whole organisms are presented. Topics include; delivery of genes into cells and animals, generation of transgenic and gene knockout animals, genome editing, DNA forensics, and aspects of systems biology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 311 or MICR 391 (or 395).


BIOC 489.6 — 1&2(8P)
Extended Research Approaches in Biochemistry

The student will: work two terms on a project available in the research laboratory of a faculty member, under that faculty member's supervision; become familiar with the pertinent research literature; establish procedures, collect, record and analyze experimental results; submit to the department a written thesis which incorporates the background to the work done, procedures used, results obtained and a discussion of the results and their significance. The student will defend the thesis findings.

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 310, 311 or MCIM 391 (formerly MICR 395) (may be taken concurrently) and permission of the department. Preference will be given to biochemistry honours students.


BIOC 490.0 — 1&2(1S)
Seminar

The biochemistry seminar series presents a wide range of topics from the life sciences.

BIOC 812.3 — 2(3L-1T)
Protein Structure Function and Engineering

The details of protein structure, domains, folding and targeting, and modern experimental approaches to protein engineering will be presented. The inter-relationship between structure and function in enzyme protein mechanism and regulation will be stressed.

Permission of instructor required.
Note: Offered in the academic year 2007/2008 and alternate years thereafter (2009/2010, etc.).


BIOC 820.3 — 2(3L)
Advanced Plant Biochemistry

This advanced course examines current topics in plant biochemistry with an emphasis on metabolic and developmental integration as well as plant interaction with the environment. Current literature from these subject areas will be incorporated and emphasis given to the molecular genetic approaches utilized to elucidate our current understanding.

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 200, 220, 230, or BIOL 211; or permission of the department.
Note: Students who have credit for BIOC 420 may not take this course for credit. Offered in the academic year 2010-2011 and alternate years thereafter (2012-2013, etc.).


BIOC 830.3 — 2(3L)
Cell Biochemistry

The biochemical properties of eukaryotic cells will be investigated with special emphasis on post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins, cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, signal transduction, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. Students will be asked to research one of the topics discussed in the course by consulting the current literature and prepare a term paper.

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 211; BIOC 310; or permission of the department.
Note: Offered in 2011-2012 and alternate years thereafter (2013-2014, etc.).


BIOC 836.3 — 2(3L-1T)
Advanced Nucleic Acids

Modern and advanced methods and strategies of nucleic acid manipulation, and characterization of genes in cells and whole organisms are presented. Topics include PCR applications, delivery of genes into cells and animals, generation of transgenic and gene knockout animals, DNA fingerprinting, and aspects of molecular medicine such as screening approaches for genetic diseases.

Permission of instructor required.
Note: Offered in the academic year 2008/2009 and alternate years thereafter (2010/2011, etc.).


BIOC 843.3 — 1(3L-3P)
X Ray Crystallographic Structure Determination

Describes the principles, methodology, application and limitations of the techniques in x-ray crystallographic structure elucidations. The methods employed to solve both small molecule and macromolecular crystal structures will be discussed and a small molecular structure determination will be carried out by the students.

Permission of instructor required.
Note: Offered in 2011-2012 and alternate years thereafter (2013-2014, etc.).


BIOC 850.3 — 1&2(L-S)
Current Topics in Biochemistry

Reviews and discusses recent advances in Biochemistry and related areas through paper presentations by students. Students will be evaluated on their presentations and on a grant application that is prepared based on one of the papers presented.

Permission of instructor required.


BIOC 898.3
Special Topics

These courses are offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

BIOC 899
Special Topics

These courses are offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

BIOC 990
Seminar

All Biochemistry graduate students must register annually for this course. The Biochemistry seminar series presents a wide range of topics from the life sciences and are held throughout the year. Students in the biochemistry graduate program are required to attend these seminars, and may also be required to attend seminars in related fields given in other departments or institutions on campus.

BIOC 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

BIOC 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.