This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

BIOL 107.6 — 1&2(3L-1.5T)
The Living Earth

Includes geological, biological and ecological studies. It considers the history of the earth and the forces which shape its changing surface, the nature of life and the requirements for life on the earth, heredity and evolution including the record of life preserved in the rocks, organism diversity, and the effects of people on the environment. The lectures will be supplemented by outside reading and by small-group tutorial and demonstration sessions.

Note: Students with credit for BISC 100 or 101 or BIOL 108, 110, 120 or 121 or GEOL 205 or 206 may not take this course for credit. BIOL 107 is recommended for students in Program Types A, B and D. Students in Program Type C can use BIOL 107 as a junior elective in program requirement #7.


BIOL 108.6 — 1&2(3L-3P)
The Living Earth

Follows the same lectures as BIOL 107 but has a three-hour laboratory each week. Designed for College of Education students in the Elementary Program. There will be a Physical Sciences/ Biological Sciences laboratory devoted to an integrated approach to the environment, using techniques from Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geology. This laboratory is equivalent to a three-hour practicum.

Note: Students with credit for BISC 100 or 101 or BIOL 107, 110, 120 or 121 or GEOL 205 or 206 may not take this course for credit.


BIOL 120.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
The Nature of Life

An introduction to the underlying fundamental aspects of living systems: covering cell biology, genetics and the evolutionary processes which lead to complex, multi-cellular life forms.

Prerequisite(s): Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.
Note: Chemistry 30 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 120.


BIOL 121.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
The Diversity of Life

Our world has at least 15 million species, all of which have adapted to particular environments and lifestyles and use energy to grow and reproduce. We examine these processes in representative organisms from all the major groups, and discuss factors influencing changes in biodiversity over time and space.

Prerequisite(s): Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.
Note: Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 121.


BIOL 222.3 — 2(3L-3P)
The Living Plant

Will examine the organization of the plant body and how cells, tissues and organs function and contribute to growth, development and reproductive success. The course will deal broadly with plant biology, emphasizing flowering plants, and providing the foundation for senior courses on plants.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.
Note: BIOL 121 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 202 or BIOL 205 may not take this course for credit.


BIOL 224.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
Animal Body Systems

Will study the problems all animals overcome in order to survive and reproduce, and the different body systems that must deal with both unique and common environmental challenges.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.
Note: BIOL 121 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 203 or BIOL 217 or BMSC 224 or HSC 208 will not receive credit for BIOL 224. Students with credit for PHSI 208 may not subsequently receive credit for BIOL 224. Students may receive credit for both of BIOL 224 and PHSI 208 only if BIOL 224 is completed first. BIOL 224 and PHSI 208 may not be taken concurrently.


BIOL 226.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
Genes to Genomics

Content ranges from Mendelian genetics to computational procedures based on the complete genome. Examples from eukaryotic species, including humans, are emphasized. Topics include classical transmission genetics, cytogenetics, DNA structure and replication, gene function, mutation and repair, regulation, recombinant DNA technology, and structural, functional and comparative genomics.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.
Note: BIOL 121 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 211 will not receive credit for BIOL 226.


BIOL 228.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
An Introduction to Ecology and Ecosystems

An introduction to ecological principles and the functioning of acquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Community structure and dynamics, ecosystem production, populations, energy flow and material recycling will be considered.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 108 or BIOL 121 or GEOG 120 or 6 credit units in GEOL.
Note: Students with credit for BIOL 253 or PLSC 213 will not receive credit for BIOL 228.


BIOL 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

BIOL 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

BIOL 301.3 — 1/2(3L-3T)
Critical Issues in Biology

Examines the essential processes and principles of current, topical biological research. The course is designed to enhance the capacity to understand biological concepts, critically evaluate scientific work, develop logical and sound opinions and improve written and oral communication skills.

Prerequisite(s): 15 credit units in Biology.
Note: This course is a requirement in Four Year and Honours Biology degrees; students in these programs should consider taking BIOL 301 as early as possible in their program.


BIOL 302.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
Evolutionary Processes

A quantitative and conceptual overview of evolutionary mechanisms at different biological scales, including molecular/genetic, population and species levels.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and BIOL 121, BIOL 226 and 3 senior credit units in BIOL.
Note: This course is a requirement in all Biology degrees and serves as a prerequisite for other senior BIOL courses. Students should consider taking this course no later than their third year. Students with credit for BIOL 263 or BIOL 401 may not take this course for credit.


BIOL 314.3
Life in the North

An exploration of the natural history of organisms living in cold, northern environments. Topics focus on the special characteristics of northern environments and how organisms have adapted to life in those environments. Activities incorporate scientific and Indigenous knowledge of ecology, animal behavior, and human relationships with life in the North.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and at least one of BIOL 228, PLSC 213, INDG 241, or GEOG 280.
Note: BIOL 314 is delivered over the course of four weekends during the regular term. Students need to make themselves available for all of the scheduled course times and should consult with the Department of Biology in advance of registering for this course. Students may receive credit for only one of BIOL 312 or BIOL 314.


BIOL 316.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Molecular Genetics of Eukaryotes

Examines advanced topics in the molecular genetics of eukaryotes. Examples of topics covered include epigenetics, RNA interference or post-transcriptional gene silencing, the role of model organisms in scientific research, organelle genetics, and RNA splicing. The lab will involve a combination of hands-on experimentation, computer-based analysis and student presentations.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 226 (formerly BIOL 211).


BIOL 317.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Fundamentals of Animal Physiology

Considers physical, chemical and functional aspects of animal cells and tissues. Specifically examines membrane transport mechanisms, bioelectricity and fundamental principles of muscle and nervous system physiology, evolution and plasticity. Cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory are introduced.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 224 (or HSC 208); CHEM 112; CHEM 115 or CHEM 250 (CHEM 115 recommended).
Note: PHYS 115 and 117 are recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 217 will not receive credit for this course. Offered on an annual basis.


BIOL 318.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Comparative Animal Systems Physiology

An in-depth examination of cardiovascular, respiratory, osmoregulatory, digestive, and reproductive system physiology in animals. Examples are drawn from vertebrate and invertebrate models. Emphasizes endocrine and nervous coordination of cellular and whole animal body functions.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 317 (formerly BIOL 217).
Note: Students with credit for BIOL 218 will not receive credit for BIOL 318.


BIOL 323.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Plant Systematics and Evolution

Introduces vascular plant diversity. Will include basic principles of plant systematics (methods of classification, description, nomenclature and taxonomic keys), practical experience with the identification of vascular plants, and tempos and patterns of plant speciation and evolution.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and BIOL 222.
Note: Students are required to make a collection of plants and may wish to begin the collection over the summer prior to the course. In that case, contact the instructor for details and supplies pertaining to the plant collection.


BIOL 324.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Plants and Human Affairs

A consideration of economically important vascular plants, plant families, plant parts and products used as food, textiles and medicines. The origin, history and domestication of plants and major crops, diversification of crops and major centers of agriculture in the world and fundamental roles of plants in human societies are discussed.

Permission of the instructor required.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units selected from BIOL 107, 108, 120, 121; or completion of 60 credit units at the university level.


BIOL 325.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Plant Cells and Tissues

A structural and functional study of the organization of the vascular plant body. The course deals with plant cell organelles, cell types and basic tissue organization. Examination of live material is emphasized in the laboratory.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and 222.


BIOL 326.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Plant Development

Deals with patterns of growth and development of the plant body with special reference to genetic, hormonal and environmental control of developmental processes. Flowering plants are emphasized but also compares evolutionary changes in developmental patterns within other plant groups. Laboratories examine live materials and include tissue culture and other experimentation.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 222.
Note: BIOL 121 is recommended.


BIOL 331.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Plant Physiology

Three sections which deal respectively with plant cell physiology, the physiology of the whole plant and the physiology of plant growth and morphogenesis.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 222.


BIOL 342.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Fungi Environment and People

Often overlooked due to their small size, or wrongly considered to be 'lower plants', fungi are more closely related to animals. They have major impacts on human health, biotechnology, the environment, and agriculture. We examine fungal diversity, cell biology and development, reproductive and genetic strategies, symbioses, and biotechnology applications in this diverse and successful group.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and 121.
Note: BIOL 226 (formerly BIOL 211) and/or ACB 200 or BMSC 220 are recommended. A field trip to observe local fungal specimens in their natural environment may be scheduled for a Saturday, depending on the season and weather. This possibility will be discussed during the first lecture.


BIOL 345.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Introductory Plant Pathology

A survey of the biology of the major groups of plant pathogens and of the major types of plant diseases with emphasis on symptoms, transmission and control. Approximately equal emphasis is placed on theory and on laboratory work.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and 222 (formerly 202 or 205).


BIOL 350.3 — 1(7P)
Field Course

Introduction to the principles and methods of field biology as applied to southern boreal forest and lake ecosystems. Students will complete an independent field research project. Includes an extended field study during late summer at the Biological Field Station on the Kenderdine Campus at Emma Lake.

Permission of the instructor required.
Prerequisite(s): 21 senior credit units BIOL, and restricted to students with minimum CWA of 70% overall and in Biology.
Note: This course is required in the Honours program in Biology. Enrolment is limited and priority will be given to students admitted to the Honours program in Biology. It is recommended that this course be completed after the third year of study.


BIOL 361.3 — 1/2(3L-4P)
Vertebrate Biology

An introduction to the biology of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. The course will consist of a brief phylogenetic survey and an examination of the evolution of different vertebrate body systems. Emphasis will be placed on comparative morphology, embryology and physiology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and 224 (formerly BIOL 203).
Note: Students with credit for BIOL 351 may not take this course for credit.


BIOL 363.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Population Ecology

The theory of population growth, distribution and abundance of organisms.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 228 and a course in statistics.
Note: BIOL 302 is recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 263 or BIOL 473 may not take this course for credit.


BIOL 365.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Insect Diversity and Evolution

Surveys insects and their close relatives based on morphology and taxonomy. Focuses on insect natural history, comparative anatomy and classification. Representative types examined in the laboratory provide an understanding of current trends in insect taxonomy and phylogeny.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and 121 and 3 additional credit units of senior BIOL courses; or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students are required to make a collection of insects and may wish to begin the collection over the summer prior to the course. In that case, contact the instructor for details.


BIOL 373.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Community Ecology

Examines physical and biotic factors shaping species assemblages over space and time, especially processes controlling plant communities (e.g. environmental factors, disturbance, and biotic interactions). Explores current issues in community ecology, such as impacts of diversity loss, invasive species, and environmental change. Laboratories focus on experimental design, data collection and analysis.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 228 or PLSC 213; one of STAT 245, STAT 246, or PLSC 214.


BIOL 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

BIOL 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

BIOL 410.3 — 2(2.5S)
Current Perspectives in Environmental Biology

Consists of modules taught by faculty in the environmental sciences. Students will participate together in weekly seminars, assigned readings, essays and oral presentations to learn about current issues in the environment and cutting-edge research with an environmental focus.

Permission of the Department is required.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 228 and BIOL 301.
Note: Students in the B.Sc. 4-Year and Honours Environmental Biology program must take this course in their fourth year. Enrolment preference will be given to students who have declared a major in Environmental Biology.


BIOL 412.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Limnology

Introduction to the ecology of lakes. The biological, chemical and physical properties of lakes are examined at lake and watershed levels. Theoretical and applied topics, including human impacts (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, ultraviolet radiation, contaminants, and angling) are examined. Laboratories and field trips provide training in limnological techniques.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121, BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253) and CHEM 112; or permission of the instructor.
Note: A course in statistics is recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 415 may not take this course for credit. There will be costs for a field trip in addition to tuition fees.


BIOL 420.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Molecular Biology of Plants

A study of the molecular biology of plants: nuclear and plastid genomes, coordination of expression between nuclear and plastid genomes, transposable elements, abiotic stress and hormonal effects on gene expression and plant transformation.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121, 222 (formerly 202 or 205) and one of BIOL 226 (formerly BIOL 211) or BIOC 300; and 3 additional credit units of senior BIOL courses; or permission of the instructor.


BIOL 421.3 — 1/2(1L-6P)
Functional Genomics

A practical course that will provide students with the background, experience and understanding of modern molecular biology as it pertains to the biological sciences. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing large, publicly available datasets to generate and test hypotheses about how organisms function at the molecular level. A single research theme will be used in the lab for investigation of biological processes in model organisms, extending into non-model species.

Permission of the department is required.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 316 or BIOC 311 or MCIM 391.
Note: BIOL 301 is recommended.


BIOL 424.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Grasses and Grasslands

A study of the morphology, systematics, biogeography, synecology and autecology of the grasses and other graminoids, and ecology of grasslands. Laboratory emphasis is on the structure and taxonomy of grasses.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and 222 (formerly 202 or 205); or permission of the instructor.


BIOL 430.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Neurobiology of Behaviour

Studies how activities in an animal's nervous systems produces and modifies natural behaviour. Topics in the course include: the detection and coding of information from the environment, integration of information for decision-making, generation of motor patterns that underlie behaviour, and general constraints on form and function of neural circuits.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 317 or HSC 350; or permission of instructor.


BIOL 436.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Animal Parasitology

Deals with helminths, arthropods and protozoa of people, domestic and wild animals, and birds. Examples from these parasite and host types will be used to illustrate important concepts, including basic structure and function, life cycles, ecology, biogeography, individual and population level host-parasite-environment relationships, epizootiology and parasite control strategies.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and 9 additional credit units of senior BIOL courses or permission of the instructor.
Note: BIOL 302 (formerly BIOL 401) is recommended.


BIOL 440.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
Photobiology

An introduction to light interactions with biological systems. The class will examine the evolution of biological pigments and photoreceptor systems. Emphasis will be placed on how plants and animals detect changes in their environment based on light cues and how they respond at the physiological level. Examples of topics which will be explored are the evolution of vision, photosynthetic energy production, circadian rhythms, phototoxicity and bioluminescence.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120; and 15 credit units of senior BIOL or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for BIOL 498: Photobiology may not take BIOL 440 for credit.


BIOL 451.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Ichthyology

The biology of fishes including their morphological diversity, physiology, behaviour and ecology, and their management and utilization.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and 224 (formerly BIOL 203) and BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253).
Note: BIOL 302 (formerly BIOL 401) is recommended.


BIOL 455.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Mammal Diversity and Evolution

Introduction to local and world mammal faunas including living and extinct taxa. Evolution, behaviour, ecology, morphology, phylogeny, and physiology will be emphasized in lectures. Laboratories will be concerned with classification, identification, and anatomical adaptations.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and 224 (formerly BIOL 203) and BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253).
Note: BIOL 302 (formerly BIOL 401) is recommended.


BIOL 458.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Ornithology

Introduction to the diversity of birds of the world. Lecture material focuses on evolution, ecology, behaviour, physiology and conservation. Laboratories focus on morphological diversity and taxonomy.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and 224 (formerly BIOL 203) and BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253).
Note: BIOL 302 (formerly 401) is recommended.


BIOL 466.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Aquatic Insects

Identification of aquatic insects, discussions of current literature, field trips, collections, and laboratory work.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 and 224 (formerly BIOL 203) and BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253); or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students are advised to contact the instructor about making a collection of insects the summer before enrolling in the course.


BIOL 470.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Conservation Biology

An introduction to the theoretical and scientific foundation of conservation biology as applied to animals and plants. Course material will cover elements of population, community and landscape ecology as they apply to conservation challenges. Labs will include measuring biodiversity and analysis of current conservation issues. Field trips are compulsory.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253) and BIOL 302 (formerly 263 or 401) or permission of the instructor.
Note: There will be costs for a field trip in addition to tuition fees.


BIOL 472.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Animal Behaviour

Fundamental concepts in animal behaviour. An introduction to the form, control and adaptive significance of animal behaviour.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 228; 6 additional credit units of senior BIOL courses; one of STAT 245, STAT 246 or PLSC 214.


BIOL 475.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
Ecological Toxicology

An introduction to the principles of ecological toxicology, including: population modeling, experimental design and interpretation of field studies, and contaminant impact assessment on populations, communities and ecosystems. Computer laboratory exercises will be used to model populations and ecosystems and analyze changes in populations and communities resulting from contaminant impacts.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and 121 (formerly BIOL 110) and BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253) and 6 additional credit units of senior BIOL courses and a course in statistics; or permission of the instructor.
Note: TOX 301 is recommended.


BIOL 480.3 — 1/2(6P)
Biology Research

The student will work on a laboratory or field project under the supervision of a faculty member. Before beginning, the student must obtain a supervisor and then submit an outline of the project for approval by the Head of the Department. At the end of the project, the student will submit to the department a written report in thesis form.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 301 (may be taken concurrently). Restricted to fourth year biology students with a Cumulative Weighted Average of 70% or better.
Note: Students with credit for BIOL 481 cannot take BIOL 480 for credit. Honours Agriculture Biology students may not take both this course and AGRC 494. Those in College Scholar Programs may not take this course in addition to another laboratory or field project designed under the Program.


BIOL 481.6 — 1&2(6P)
Extended Research Project in Biology

Laboratory and/or field project under the supervision of a faculty member. Student must obtain a supervisor who submits course outline (syllabus) to the Department Head. Written reports and an oral presentation will be required.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 301 (may be taken concurrently). Restricted to fourth year Biology students with a minimum C.W.A. of 70% in Biology.
Attention: Students must consult and discuss their research interests with a potential supervisor before registering for this course, preferably in the spring or early summer.
Note: Students with credit for BIOL 480 cannot take BIOL 481 for credit. Agricultural Biology students may not take both BIOL 481 and AGRC 494 for credit. Those in College Scholar programs may not take this course in addition to another laboratory or field project designed under the program.


BIOL 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

BIOL 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

BIOL 811.3 — 2(3S)
Cell Biology

Review of the literature on selected topics including microscopic and sub-microscopic cellular organization, and cell function.

Permission of instructor required.


BIOL 815.3 — 2(3S)
Advanced Limnology

A review of current ecological and environmental topics concerning inland waters.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 412, or an undergraduate limnology course, or permission of the instructor.


BIOL 825.3 — 1(2S-4R)
Current Topics in Plant Molecular Biology

A review of recent advances in plant molecular biology, emphasizing the use of molecular techniques in studying basic plant processes.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 420 or PLSC 416; or permission of the instructor.


BIOL 827.3 — 1(1S-2L)
Multivariate Analysis in Ecology

An introduction to statistical methods for the classification and ordination of ecological communities, and approaches to developing multivariate statistical models of ecological interactions. Practical experience in applications of multivariate analyses will be developed by applying analyses to ecological datasets. Some previous experience with the software program R is recommended.

Prerequisite(s): At least one undergraduate course in univariate statistics and at least one upper level (300-400) undergraduate course in ecology.


BIOL 830.3 — 2(3S)
Advanced Neurobiology of Behaviour

This course explores, at an advanced level and through critical examination of current literature, neural mechanisms responsible for the generation of adaptive behaviours of animals. Topics for discussion will deal with structural or functional characteristics of neurons, synapses or circuits that have a definite motor or behavioural correlate.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 430 or permission of the instructor.


BIOL 836.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Plant Physiology

Selected topics dealing with recent advances in plant physiology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 331 or permission of the instructor.


BIOL 841.3 — 2(2L-2S-2P)
Advanced Plant Pathology

Selected topics in plant pathology and molecular plant-microbe interactions.

Permission of instructor required.


BIOL 862.3 — 3L
Advanced Reproductive Biology of Seed Plants

A survey of floral diversity, pollination mechanisms, breeding systems, and reproductive strategies of seed plants with an emphasis on angiosperms. One important component is the examination of floral biology for reproductive success. With increasing emphasis on crop/seed yields, germination, and seedling establishment/recruitment, this course is important for students in the area of Plant Biology, Ecology, and Plant Sciences dealing with these topics.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 323.3 and/or BIOL 326.3 or equivalent, or instructor’s authorization.
Note: Strong knowledge in concepts of plant biology, genetics, and evolution would be an asset.


BIOL 871.3 — 1/2(1S-3R-2P)
Advanced Insect Physiology

A review of recent advances in certain fields of insect physiology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 365, 366; or permission of the instructor.


BIOL 872.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Animal Behaviour

Examination of current concepts and techniques in the study of animal behaviour.

BIOL 880.3 — 2(3L)
Applied Statistics in Ecology

An overview of basic statistical methods and their applications to ecological studies. Topics include descriptive statistics, frequency analyses, experimental designs and analyses of variance, trend analyses, and analyses by rank. Designed for students involved in ecological research.

Prerequisite(s): STAT 245 or equivalent.


BIOL 883.3 — 2(2S)
Ecology Seminar

Students and faculty reports on selected topics in aquatic and terrestrial ecology.

BIOL 889.3 — 2(2L-1P)
Avian Wildlife Conservation and Management Theory in Practice

Evaluates current problems and solutions in conservation and management of wildlife, primarily birds, with emphasis on hypothesis-testing, and identification, review and application of ecological theories and modern analytical techniques (e.g., abundance estimation; survival analysis). Quantitative analysis of specific case-histories dealing with management of birds.

Prerequisite(s): A senior level ecology course and permission of the instructor.


BIOL 898.3 — 1/2/1&2 (R/T)
Special Topics

Assigned reading and tutorials, projects and/or lectures in special topics related to the student's major field of interest. Students are required to prepare three essays or term papers or their equivalent if another form of evaluation is more appropriate.

BIOL 899
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

BIOL 990
Seminar

All graduate students are required to attend and contribute to the annual BIOL 990 graduate student symposium to develop scientific communication skills. Biology M.Sc. and Ph.D. students must register for this course each term until they have fulfilled the BIOL 990 requirement.

BIOL 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

BIOL 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.