This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

CHEM 112.3 — 1/2(3L-3.5P)
General Chemistry I Structure Bonding and Properties of Materials

Structure, bonding and properties of materials. Topics include atoms and molecules, bonding, molecular structure, intermolecular forces, states of matter, and properties of materials. The laboratory illustrates material covered in the lectures.

Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 30 and (Mathematics B30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30).
Note: Mathematics C30 or Geometry-Trigonometry 30 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for CHEM 111 or 114 may not take this course for credit.


CHEM 114.3 — 1(3L-3P)
General Chemistry for Engineers

Topics include atoms and molecules, stoichiometry, bonding, molecular structure, states of matter, chemical reactions, and thermochemistry.

Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 30; and (Mathematics B30 and Mathematics C30) or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30).
Note: This course is intended for students in the College of Engineering. Students with credit for CHEM 111, 112, or 116 may not take this course for credit.


CHEM 115.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
General Chemistry II Chemical Processes

Chemical reactions, including the rates and energetics of reactions and specific types of reactions. Topics include stoichiometry, chemical reactions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, specific reactions, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111, 112 or 114.
Note: The introductory CHEM courses were changed in 2002. Students with credit for CHEM 111 may take CHEM 115.


CHEM 221.3 — 1/2(3L-4P)
Analytical Chemistry I

Discussion of the basic principles and tenets of analytical science and how these aspects are put into practice in analytical techniques.

Prerequisite(s): (CHEM 112.3 or CHEM 114.3) and CHEM 115.3.


CHEM 231.3 — 1/2(3L-4P)
Inorganic Chemistry I

This course introduces the area of Inorganic Chemistry by systematically dealing with the chemistry of main group elements. Common structures of metals and ionic compounds as well as molecular properties in terms of modern theories of structure and bonding are discussed. The laboratory provides experience in the preparation and investigation of the properties of typical inorganic compounds.

Prerequisite(s): (CHEM 112.3 or CHEM 114.3) and CHEM 115.3.


CHEM 242.3 — 1/2(3L-3P-1T)
Thermodynamics and Kinetics

The study of the structure of matter and the changes it undergoes. Topics include properties of materials, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria and chemical kinetics. The laboratory provides experience with the use of physical-chemical equipment and problem solving skills.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115 and MATH 110 or 123.


CHEM 250.3 — 1/2(3L-3P-1T)
Introduction to Organic Chemistry

An introduction to organic chemistry; students will learn to name organic compounds, predict some of the properties and reactivity of compounds based on molecular structure, and grasp the importance of these concepts and their application to all sciences and life in general. Almost all the reactions in living matter involve organic compounds, and it is impossible to understand the molecular processes of living systems without knowing organic chemistry. CHEM 250.3 is intended as a basis for other courses, and a beginning for understanding organic and bio-organic chemistry. The laboratory will introduce students to basic chemical laboratory skills frequently used in organic chemistry.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 or 114.
Note: The introductory CHEM courses were changed in 2002. Students with credit for CHEM 111 may take CHEM 250. Students with credit for CHEM 251 may not take CHEM 250 for credit.


CHEM 255.3 — 1/2(3L-3P-1T)
Bio Organic Chemistry

Intended to give insight into the specific and fundamental role of organic reactions occurring in nature, to students of all scientific disciplines who have been introduced to organic chemistry and to the life sciences. The emphasis will be on the patterns of reactivity among natural products, rather than on the biochemical roles that these molecules play. The laboratory will introduce students to experimental approaches to biomimetic, biological and pharmaceutical chemistry.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 250.
Note: CHEM 115 and BIOC 200 recommended. Students with credit for CHEM 251 may take CHEM 255 for credit. Students with credit for CHEM 252 may not take CHEM 255 for credit.


CHEM 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

CHEM 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

CHEM 322.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Analytical Chemistry II

Introduction to modern instrumental methods of chemical analyses. The laboratory is designed to develop basic understanding of common instrumental methods. Topics include chromatography, electrophoresis, electrochemistry and spectroscopy.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 221.


CHEM 332.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Inorganic Chemistry II

An introduction to transition metal chemistry including molecular symmetry coordination chemistry, electronic structure and properties of d-metal complexes, characterization techniques in inorganic chemistry and organometallic chemistry of the d-block. The laboratory work includes experiments on the preparation, characterization and applications of transition metal compounds.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 231.


CHEM 334.3 — 1/2(3L)
Materials Chemistry

Materials chemistry involves the study of the synthesis, properties, characterization, and applications of solid state and polymeric materials. This course is fashioned to illustrate how chemistry can be rationally used to synthesize a wide range of materials with properties that can be tailored for advanced technologies.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 231


CHEM 344.3 — 1/2(3L-3P-1T)
Introductory Chemical Quantum Mechanics

An introduction to quantum mechanics and chemical systems as a foundation for courses concerned with the theory and spectroscopy of atomic and molecular systems.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 242 and (MATH 112, 116 or 124 (116 preferred) and (PHYS 117 or 125 (125 preferred).
Note: Students with credit for CHEM 243 may not take this course for credit.


CHEM 353.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Organic Structure Analysis

Presents the theory and practice of various spectroscopic methods for structure determination with a focus on NMR based methods. Emphasizes the integrated interpretation of spectroscopic data and problem solving. The laboratory component provides 'hands-on' experience with the acquisition and manipulation of spectroscopic data.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 250.
Note: Students with credit for CHEM 458 may not take this course for credit.


CHEM 354.3 — 1/2(3L-4P)
Physical Organic Chemistry

Provides a greater understanding of the structure of organic compounds, and the underlying principles and rationale for organic reactions. The laboratory combines preparative, analytical, and computational experiments to enhance the understanding of physical and mechanistic aspects of organic chemistry.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115 and 255 (formerly CHEM 252).


CHEM 369.3 — 2(8P)
Synthetic Chemistry Practicum

Laboratory course focusing on fundamental experimental techniques of synthetic chemistry (organic and inorganic). The course will focus on techniques used to quantitatively measure, transfer, and purify chemical substances including those requiring protection from air and moisture. The main part of the course will integrate those techniques in multi-step syntheses.

Permission of the coordinator required.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 255 and 332.


CHEM 375.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
Environmental Chemistry

The disposal and treatment of waste materials will be discussed in terms of their effect on the gaseous and aqueous environments. A series of problems designed to illustrate the material covered in each topic will be assigned. The laboratory sessions are designed to give some understanding of how tests for environmental quality are carried out in the field and in the laboratory.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115.


CHEM 377.3 — 1/2(3L)
Industrial Chemistry

Discussion of the basic principles of chemistry utilized in diverse technological practices.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115 and (MATH 110 or MATH 123 or MATH 125).


CHEM 380.3 — 1/2(6P)
3rd Year Research

A laboratory, library, theoretical or computer study under the supervision of a member of the Department. Project is intended to be carried out during the third year of the program. At the end of the project the student will present both an oral and a written report summarizing the results.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 21 credit units in CHEM.
Note: Students who have 30 credit units or more of CHEM courses should take CHEM 482 or 483 instead. Students who have credit for CHEM 482 or CHEM 483 may not take this course for credit.


CHEM 398.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

CHEM 399.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

CHEM 402.0 — 1&2(1S)
Seminar

Attendance at departmental seminar sessions throughout the academic year is required by students in the final year of a Four-year or Honours program. Consists of presentations by departmental visitors, faculty and students, followed by discussions.

CHEM 420.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry

This course covers advanced techniques in chemical analysis. Topics will include analytical methods not covered in CHEM 221.3 or CHEM 322.3, more detailed discussion of fundamental concepts, and the applications of analytical chemistry in various disciplines.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 322.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topics covered in each offering differ substantially. In such cases, students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


CHEM 430.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Selected topics that are not dealt with or are covered only at an elementary level in other inorganic chemistry courses offered by the department. Possible topics include crystallographic and spectroscopic methods of structure determination, organometallic chemistry, cluster compounds, catalysis, nonaqueous solution chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, structure and bonding, and excited state processes.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 332.
Note: Students in programs other than Chemistry who have credit for CHEM 231 or its equivalent may seek permission from the department. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


CHEM 435.3 — 1/2(3L)
Chemical Applications of Group Theory

Understanding the connection between symmetry and electronic and spectroscopic properties of molecules is the main objective of this course. A systematic introduction of point-group symmetries and group theory is provided.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 332.
Note: CHEM 344 (formerly CHEM 243) recommended. Students in programs other than Chemistry who have credit for CHEM 231 or its equivalent may seek permission from the department.


CHEM 439.3 — 1/2(3L-3.5P)
Organometallic Chemistry

A detailed look at both main group and transition metal organometallic chemistry. Emphasis will be on basic mechanisms, structure-reactivity relationships and applications in organic synthesis and catalysis.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 332.
Note: Students in programs other than Chemistry who have credit for CHEM 231 or its equivalent may seek permission from the department.


CHEM 440.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry

Selected topics that are not dealt with or are covered only at an elementary level in other physical chemistry courses offered by the department. Possible topics include advanced spectroscopy, nuclear chemistry, photochemistry, polymers, radiation chemistry, solid-state chemistry, structural techniques, surface and colloid chemistry.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 242 and permission of the instructor.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


CHEM 444.3 — 1/2(3L-3P alt wks-1T alt wks)
Computational Chemistry

Computational chemistry including electronic and molecular structure calculations, and the study of macroscopic molecules and phases. Its focus is on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics and how they are applied to simulation techniques. Contemporary applications, such as conformational analysis, protein folding and molecular design, will be introduced.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 344 (formerly CHEM 243) or by permission of instructor.
Note: Students with credit for CHEM 343 will not receive credit for this course.


CHEM 450.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry

Selected topics that are not dealt with or are covered only at an elementary level in other organic chemistry courses offered by the department. Possible topics include organic synthesis, organic reaction mechanisms, natural products, organometallic chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, carbohydrate chemistry and organic photochemistry.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 255.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


CHEM 456.3 — 1/2(3L)
Natural Products

Provides a basic knowledge of Natural Products Chemistry with emphasis on secondary metabolism. Includes an overview of primary and secondary metabolism, modern techniques for studying secondary metabolism, biological reactions, interaction of plants with other living organisms, and major classes of bioactive compounds grouped according to their basic building blocks and their biogenesis.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 255
Note: CHEM 353 recommended.


CHEM 482.3 — 1/2(6P)
4th Year Research

A laboratory, library, theoretical or computer study under the supervision of a member of the Department. Project is intended to be carried out during the final year of the program. At the end of the project the student will present both an oral and a written report summarizing the results.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 30 credit units in CHEM.
Note: Students who have credit for both CHEM 380 and CHEM 483 may not take this course for credit.


CHEM 483.6 — 1&2(6P)
4th Year Research

A laboratory, library, theoretical or computer study under the supervision of a member of the Department. Project will be carried out throughout the final year of the program. At the end of the project the student will present both an oral and a written report summarizing the results.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 30 credit units of CHEM.
Note: Students who have credit for both CHEM 380 and CHEM 482 may not take this course for credit.


CHEM 498.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

CHEM 499.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

CHEM 801.6 — 1/2(3L)
Modern Aspects of Chemistry

An overview of the core material required for graduate research in chemistry presented in modular form. Emphasis is placed on integrating chemical knowledge from all subdisciplines of chemistry encompassing both experimental and theoretical approaches.

CHEM 815.3 — 3L
Selected Topics in Biological Chemistry

This course will instruct students in advanced and modern aspects of biological chemistry, particularly biological catalysis and structure-function relationships, and emphasizing chemical and quantitative approaches to biological research.

Permission of the instructor is required.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


CHEM 820.3 — 1/2(3L)
Physical Methods of Molecular Structure Determination

Presents the application of various spectroscopic methods to structure determination including mass spectrometry (MS), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The majority of the course (approx. 75%) will focus on NMR based methods including multipulse and two dimensional techniques. Although aspects of the underlying theory are presented, the course focuses the integrated interpretation (as opposed to the theory) of various spectroscopic data for the purpose of structure determination; problem solving is emphasized.

CHEM 823.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry

Selected topics that are not dealt with or are covered only briefly in other chemistry courses offered by the department.

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


CHEM 832.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Selected topics that are not dealt with or are covered only briefly in other chemistry courses offered by the department.

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


CHEM 833.3
Characterization Methods in Materials Chemistry

This course develops an awareness of a variety of characterization techniques in materials chemistry, especially x-ray spectroscopy, diffraction, scattering, and electron microscopy techniques.

CHEM 834.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry

Selected topics that are not dealt with or are covered only briefly in other chemistry courses offered by the department.

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


CHEM 852.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry

Selected topics that are not dealt with or are covered only briefly in other chemistry courses offered by the department.

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


CHEM 858.3 — 1/2(3L)
Natural Products Chemistry

Provides a basic knowledge of natural products chemistry with emphasis on secondary metabolism. Topics covered include an overview of primary and secondary metabolism, modern techniques for studying secondary metabolism, biological reactions, chemical interactions between living organisms, and classes of bioactive compounds grouped according to building blocks and biogenesis.

CHEM 898
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

CHEM 899
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

CHEM 990
Seminar

Weekly chemistry seminar series. Graduate students are required to attend these seminar for the duration of their program and are expected to present a seminar near the end of their degree (PhD students only).

CHEM 991.0 — 1/2(1S)
Literature Core Course

Offers graduate students a formal framework for the critical discussion of current chemical literature and for the critical assessment of its importance. Students will give oral presentations based on research articles from premier chemical journals.

CHEM 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

CHEM 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.