This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2015 to April 2016.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2015-2016, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

ECON 002.0
MITACS Globalink Undergraduate Visiting Research

ECON GR

ECON 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introductory Microeconomics

Shows the student how to understand the individual consumption and production decisions which are made within a market economy, guided by prices and costs. Economic concepts of supply, demand, cost, response to price changes, production, equilibrium, and income distribution are analyzed.

ECON 114.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introductory Macroeconomics

Shows the student how to understand the collective problems in economic policy, and the choices which face a modern economy. Social accounting, national income, consumption, saving, government spending, taxation, investment, interest rates, money and banking, foreign trade, and balance of payments are analyzed.

Note: ECON 111 recommended.


ECON 211.3 — 1/2(3L)
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

Presents the student with a formal analysis of demand, elasticity, cost, production, firm and market equilibrium, competition, monopoly, oligopoly, factor demand and prices, general market equilibrium, and welfare.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111.
Note: Students with credit for ECON 213 may not take this course for credit.


ECON 214.3 — 1/2(3L)
Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

Presents the student with a formal analysis of national accounting, the consumption function, investment, public expenditure, taxes, budgets, money and interest, IS-LM analysis of general equilibrium in an open economy, aggregate supply and demand, public policy, inflation, and the rudiments of growth theory.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 114, and one of ECON 211 or 213.


ECON 221.3 — 1/2(3L)
Women and the Economy

An examination of women's changing economic roles. Includes an analysis of labour force participation, wage inequality, gender differences in education, intra-household distribution of resources, economics of reproduction, and how technological change affects women.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111.


ECON 223.3 — 1/2(3L)
Labour Economics

An economic analysis of the labour market. Topics discussed will include the allocation of the labour force among sectors, industries and occupations and the functions and nature of the labour market. The problem of unemployment and public policy will be considered.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 227.3 — 1/2(3L)
Wage Determination

A study of the theories of wage determination in various institutional settings. Analysis of the general level of wages and employment will also be considered. Emphasis will be on theoretical models.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 231.3 — 1/2(3L)
Co operatives

The historical background, philosophy and development of co-operatives are studied with special reference to the experience and problems of the prairie economy. Economic problems peculiar to co-operative organization are analyzed.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111.


ECON 234.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economics of Health Care

An application of economic analysis to selected aspects of the health care delivery system. Emphasis will be placed upon an evaluation of the applicability of consumption and production theory to the delivery of physicians' services. Empirical work on the demand for and supply of physicians' services will be reviewed with particular reference to its significance for public policy.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111.


ECON 254.3 — 1/2(3L)
International Trading System

A survey of the development of the international trading system with particular attention to its evolution in the post-World War II period.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111.


ECON 256.3 — 1/2(3L)
International Monetary System

A survey of the development of the international monetary system with particular attention to its evolution in the post-World War II period.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 114.


ECON 264.3 — 1/2(3L)
Chinese Economic Development

This course focuses on modern China's economic development, especially in the post-1979 reform period, and its relationship to the economic development of the Greater China Circle: China, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and ECON 114


ECON 270.3 — 1/2(3L)
Development in Non Industrialized Countries

A review of the economic development of selected countries. The relevance of resources, financial institutions, government action and regional differences to problems of industrialization in these countries will be studied in the light of past and current theories of economic development.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 272.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economics of Transition

Surveys core issues in transition economics. It discusses the legacy of the central planners, the progress achieved so far, and the need for further reforms. Topics include democratic transition and ¿integration' to the European Union¿, oligarchic transition, and gradualist transition. The course also introduces economic analysis of corruption.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 275.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economics of Natural Resources

The application of economic analysis to issues concerning the use of natural resources, their management and conservation, as well as environmental effects following therefrom. Policy problems related to the ownership of natural resources, their management, and taxation will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 277.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economics of the Environment

An introduction to the economic analysis of environmental issues. It will include analysis of environmental quality, benefit-cost analysis, and evaluation of different environmental policies and their application in Canada and Saskatchewan. It will conclude with analysis of global environmental issues.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 280.3 — 1/2(3L)
Classical Economics

The history of classical economics: Adam Smith, David Ricardo and Karl Marx, among others, with emphasis on the theories of value, distribution, growth, population, money and trade.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 298.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ECON 299.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ECON 305.3 — 1(3L)
Quantitative Methods in Economics I

An introduction to the application of quantitative methods in Economics.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111; ECON 114; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123, 125.
Note: Students with credit for a course in linear algebra may not take this course for credit.


ECON 306.3 — 2(3L)
Quantitative Methods in Economics II

An introduction to comparative statics and optimization methods in Economics.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111; ECON 114; one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125; and one of ECON 305, MATH 264, MATH 266.
Note: Students with credit for a course in the calculus of multiple variables may not take this course for credit.


ECON 307.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economic Forecasting

Presents forecasting techniques for the economic variables necessary for planning by business, government and NGOs. The course includes choosing forecasting techniques. The course discusses both how to prepare a forecast and how to attack or defend a forecast.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 214 and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123, 125.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 cu in STAT or one of PLSC 214, GE 210, COMM 104, EPSE 441, PSY 233, SOC 225.


ECON 311.3 — 1(3L)
Money Banking and Capital Markets

A study of the evolution and kinds of money, its functions and its economic significance. Topics discussed include theories of the demand for money, the money supply process with particular emphasis on the role of chartered banks, central banking, and financial intermediation. The concepts developed in this analytical survey are then utilized to evaluate recent Canadian monetary policy.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 211.


ECON 314.3 — 1/2(3L)
Development Economics

Studies theories of economic development. Topics include human resources, financial institutions, sectoral composition, international trade, and income distribution.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and ECON 214
Note: Students with credit for ECON 417 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled ECON 417 until 2013.


ECON 316.3 — 1/2(3L)
Portfolio Theory and Investment Analysis

Concerned with the theory of asset choice under conditions of risk and uncertainty. It considers various models of portfolio analysis, and capital market equilibrium.

Formerly: ECON 216.
Prerequisite(s): ECON 114; ECON 204 (or equivalent courses in statistics); one of ECON 211 or 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123, or 125.


ECON 343.3 — 1/2(3L)
Industrial Organization

Extends the use of basic price theory to the study of market structure, conduct, and performance results. The major structural characteristics of industries in Canada, and their market conduct and performance in relation to general standards of economic welfare will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): One of ECON 211 or 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 347.3 — 1/2(3L)
Design and Evaluation of Regional Economic Policy

This class will consider the theory and practice of the evaluation of public regional policy initiatives.

Prerequisite(s): One of ECON 211 or ECON 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly MATH 101), MATH 110, MATH 121, MATH 123, or MATH 125


ECON 348.3 — 1/2(3L)
Urban Economics

A consideration of those factors which systematically influence the development and growth of cities, their spatial structure, the markets for selected public services, and some special problems of urban public finance. Selected reference is made to empirical studies of Canadian cities.

Prerequisite(s): One of ECON 211 or 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 350.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economics of Public Expenditures

A survey of the principles of resource allocation in the public sector in relation to the role and effect of expenditure policies on the achievement of the major economic objectives. Topics include public choice, cost-benefit analysis and major expenditure programs.

Prerequisite(s): One of ECON 211 or 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 352.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economics of Taxation

A survey of the principles of resource allocation in the public sector in relation to the role and effect of taxation policies on the achievement of the major economic objectives. Topics include the major taxes, fiscal federalism, and growth and the debt.

Prerequisite(s): One of ECON 211 or 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 354.3 — 1/2(3L)
International Trade and Commercial Policy

A survey of the theory and practice of international trade and commercial policy. Topics include theories of the determinants of trade, the effects of customs unions, imperfect competition and growth on trading patterns and welfare, and the theory of trade policies.

Prerequisite(s): One of ECON 211 or 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 356.3 — 1/2(3L)
International Monetary Economics

A survey of the theory and practice of the international monetary system. Topics examined include the determination of exchange rates, the international movements of capital, the conditions for balance of payments equilibrium, the process adjustment to disequilibria, and policy options in open economics.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 214 and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 373.3 — 1/2(3L)
Topics in Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

Extensions and applications of microeconomic theories. Topics include pricing with market power; game theory; factor markets; choice under uncertainty, intertemporal choice; asymmetric information; contracts; externalities, public goods.

Prerequisite(s): One of ECON 211 or 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123, or 125.


ECON 374.3 — 1/2(3L)
Topics in Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

This course examines extensions and applications of macroeconomic theories. Topics include theories of consumption and investment, asset pricing, fiscal and monetary policy, and search models of the labour market.

Prerequisite(s):ECON 214; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123, or 125.


ECON 376.3 — 1/2(3L)
Energy Economics

Energy Economics studies a wide range of issues dealing with energy consumption, energy production, and energy markets. It covers a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to energy demand and supply, the energy market structure, energy policies, and environmental impacts in the national and global contexts.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 114; one of ECON 211 or ECON 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123, or 125.


ECON 379.3
Washington Center Topics in Economics

Will cover topics in Economics, offered by the Washington Center, Washington D.C. Possible topics include How Washington Really Works - Government and Business in the New Economic Reality, International Business: The Middle East, Ethical Behavior in Organizations, Integration in the Americas - Decision Time: Challenges & Opportunities in a Competitive Global Environment, From Ideas to Action: The Anatomy of Entrepreneurship, Global Markets and International Business Strategies, International Business - Case Studies in the Strategic Management of International Trade Affairs, Project Management and Development, Science Policy and Its Challenges, Issues of Immigration and Contemporary Debates, U.S. and China in the 20th and 21st Century, Global Policy Issues: The U.S., China and the World, U.S. - China Bilateral Trade Relationship, or other topics approved by the Department of Economics.

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units of university level study including 6 credit units senior ECON.
Note: Registration in this course is restricted to students selected for the Washington Center Term Abroad program.


ECON 380.3 — 1/2(3L)
History of Economic Thought after 1870

The marginal utility theory, marginal productivity theory, neoclassical monetary theory and Keynesian economics; Menger, Jevons, Walras, Wicksteed, Marshall, Wicksell and Keynes, among others.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 214 and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 387.3 — 1/2(1S/1T/3P)
Economics Career Internship

Designed to provide students with an opportunity to study economic policy development, the application of economic theory and quantitative methods, and general economic analysis from the perspective of public, private, and non-profit organizations through a combination of on-site observations, directed readings, research and analysis.

Permission of the department.
Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units at the university level.
Note: Students are required to have a basic understanding of economic theory, quantitative methods, and general economic analysis. A junior course in calculus may be required when necessary for the specific internship.


ECON 389.3 — 1/2(3S)
Research Project in Economics

Research work on theoretical, empirical, and policy topics in microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics, or economics history/economic thought, under the supervision of members of the department.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111, 214, a junior course in calculus, and permission of the department.


ECON 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ECON 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ECON 404.6 — 1&2(3L-1P)
Econometrics

An introduction to the application of econometric methods to the examination of economic problems. The necessary techniques will be examined in both their theoretical and empirical aspects.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 204 (or equivalent courses in statistics); ECON 214; one of MATH 104 (formerly MATH 101), MATH 110, MATH 121, MATH 123, MATH 125; and one of ECON 305, MATH 264, or MATH 266.
Note: Students may not take both ECON 404 and STAT 344 for credit. Students with credit for ECON 404 may count this course for half credit toward a Statistics major.


ECON 411.3 — 1/2(3L)
Monetary Theory

An examination of recent developments in the field of monetary theory. Topics include market-clearing and non-market-clearing models of business cycle fluctuations, rational expectations, the policy ineffectiveness debate, and the time inconsistency of optimal policy.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 214 and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 412.3 — 1/2(3L)
Welfare Economics and General Equilibrium

Basic principles of constructing general equilibrium models and systematic review of the principles of welfare theory.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 114; one of ECON 211 or ECON 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly MATH 101), MATH 110, MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 125.


ECON 414.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economic Growth

Looks at the fundamental principles and economic truths common to all countries which have set for themselves the objective of growth and development. This includes the economic obstacles to development and the economic means by which developing countries can raise their rates of growth of output and living standards.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 214 and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 433.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economic Evaluation Methods in Health Policy

Provides an array of economic evaluation methods used to assess health and healthcare programs, policies, technologies and interventions. Topics include methods of measuring health and health outcomes, as well as various economic evaluation methods (cost effectiveness, cost utility and cost benefit analyses), and their applications in health and healthcare policies.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 204 and ECON 211
Note: Students with credit for ECON 498: Economic Evaluation Methods in Healthcare Policy may not take this course for credit.


ECON 450.3 — 1/2(3L)
Strategic Choice

A study of game theory - the analysis of choice in situations involving strategy, in which optimal behaviour depends explicitly on the behaviour of others. Covers the theories of bargaining games, both cooperative and non-cooperative games, both zero-sum and non-zero-sum games, and the analysis of uncertainty.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 211 and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 470.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economics of Behaviour and Behavioural Economics

The economics of behaviour and the importance of behavioural assumptions for the analytical predictions of economic theory. The economics of behaviour also has significant implications for public and private economic policy and decision making, which will be discussed in some detail in this course in the context of an analysis of the overlapping and competing theoretical frameworks for human agency used by economists.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 214 and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.


ECON 473.3 — 1/2(3L)
Mathematical Introduction to Micro Theory

Introduction to theories of consumer demand and of cost and production by means of the calculus and linear algebra. The necessary mathematical tools will be taught in the course. Recommended for potential honours and graduate students.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 114; one of ECON 211 or ECON 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly MATH 101), MATH 110, MATH 121, MATH 123, or MATH 125.


ECON 474.3 — 1/2(3L)
Mathematical Micro Theory

Some modern theories of consumer demand to be followed by linear models of the firm: revealed preference, demand under risk and uncertainty, characteristics theory of demand, input/output analysis and linear programming. This course is an extension of ECON 473.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 473.


ECON 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ECON 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

ECON 800.3 — 1(3L)
Micro Economic Theory

Studies theories of exchange, consumer demand, production and cost, and pricing.

ECON 801.3 — 1(3L)
Macro Economic Theory

A survey of macro-economic theory, and includes theories of the consumption function, theories of investment, money and interest rates, monetary and fiscal policy, and general equilibrium theory.

ECON 804.3 — 1&2(3L-3P)
Research in Econometrics

A research project serves as the primary tool to learn econometric techniques, but is augmented by a consideration of the theoretical aspects of econometrics.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 204, 305, 211, 214 or equivalents.


ECON 805.3 — 1/2(3L)
Mathematical Analysis in Economics

A study of the mathematical formulation and investigation of economic relationships. Topics include the theory of consumer demand, theory of the individual firm, input-output analysis, models of aggregate economic activity and economic growth.

ECON 808.3 — 1(3L)
Econometrics I

The fundamentals of estimation and inference in the classical regression model, with applied laboratory sessions using actual economic data. Topics covered typically include: multiple linear and non-linear regression models; least squares; maximum likelihood; instrumental variables; statistical properties of estimators; asymptotic theory; restrictions; measurement error; serial correlation; heteroskedasticity; systems of equations.

Note: Students with credit for BPBE 860 will not receive credit for this course.


ECON 809.3 — 2(3L)
Econometrics II

Considers estimation and inference in different econometrics models. The first part deals with time-series econometrics and nonstationary data: unit root; cointegration; single-equation and system methods. The second part covers panel data and discrete choice. Additional topic is added based on instructor’s current interests. Application of these techniques in applied projects.

Note: Students with credit for BPBE 861 will not receive credit for this course.


ECON 811.3 — 1/2(3L)
International Trade Theory

Studies recent developments in the pure theory of trade. Topics include current explanations of patterns of trade and factor movements, the formation of regional free trade areas, commercial policies and international cartels.

ECON 812.3 — 1/2(3L)
International Monetary Economics

The nature of adjustment in open economics, under various international monetary systems, to real and monetary disturbances. The systems investigated will include fixed exchange rates, both with and without sterilization, flexible exchange rates and managed floating.

ECON 820.3 — 1(3L)
Agricultural Policy

A study of recent developments in agricultural policy. Particular attention will be paid to the role of agriculture in programs to promote economic growth and development. Major differences in national approaches to the problems of agriculture will also be emphasized.

ECON 823.3 — 1/2(3L)
Labour Economics

The functioning of labour markets including labour supply, labour demand, accumulation of skills, contracts, and unemployment.

Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in economics; or permission of the instructor.


ECON 830.3 — 2(3L)
Topics in Public Finance

A study of modern theoretical constructs and some of their applications. Topics include cost-benefit analysis, fiscal policy, the public debt, analysis of taxes and intergovernmental fiscal relations.

ECON 833.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economic Evaluation Methods in Health Services Research

This course provides an array of economic evaluation methods used to assess health and healthcare programs, policies, technologies and interventions. Topics include methods of measuring health and health outcomes, as well as various economic evaluation methods (cost effectiveness, cost utility and cost benefit analyses), and their applications in health and healthcare policies.

B>Prerequisite(s):Permission of the instructor is required.


ECON 834.3 — 2(3L)
Health Economics

Examines health economic issues and the functioning of health care markets using microeconomic theory. Topics include health insurance and demand for health, production of health, economic evaluation methods, economic explanations for the behavior of health care providers, functioning of insurance markets, cost efficiency and regulation in health care markets.

Permission of instructor required.


ECON 840.3 — 1&2(3L)
Canada United States Economics and Political Relations

Recent trends in the economic and political relations between Canada and the United States will be arranged with particular reference to agricultural policies; capital investment; economic fluctuations; energy resources; foreign trade; trade union links; transportation; defence; and institutional arrangements for dealing with joint problems.

ECON 850.3 — 2(3L)
Game Theory Strategic and Cooperative Choices

A systematic introduction to game theory and its application in economics. Provides concepts and tools for understanding current research and performing your own research in the field. Covers both non-cooperative and cooperative game theories.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 800 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.


ECON 870.3 — 1/2(3L)
Topics in Behavioural Economics

Details the economics of behaviour and the importance of behavioural assumptions for the analytical predictions of economic theory, with special emphasis of the theory of the firm, household economics, experimental economics, rational choice analyses and public policy.

Note: Students may not receive credit for both ECON 470 and 870.


ECON 873.3 — 1(3L)
Advanced Microeconomic Theory

Provides a comprehensive treatment of general equilibrium and welfare economics, market failures, game theory, the economics of uncertainty and information, the theory of incentives.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 800 or equivalent.


ECON 874.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Macroeconomic Theory

A survey of advanced topics in modern macroeconomic theory. Topics include theories of growth, real business cycles, search in labour markets, nominal business cycles and macro policy.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 801 or equivalent.


ECON 898.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Reading, essays and discussions in an approved special field. This course will be offered only in special circumstances.

ECON 899.6
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

ECON 990
Seminar

Reports and discussion on current development and research. All graduate students in economics are required to register. Attendance and at least one paper is required for all postgraduate students during their time as a postgraduate student, whether for one year or more.

ECON 992.0
Project

A required course for students following the project M.A. option. A research paper on an approved topic must be submitted. The topic may be empirical in nature, or a critical review of the literature, or a critical analysis of some theoretical problem. The paper will be examined by a supervisor and two other members of the department.

ECON 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

ECON 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Economics Ph.D. program.