This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

FABS 002.0
MITACS Globalink Undergraduate Visiting Research

FABS 110.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Science of Food

This interdisciplinary course provides a comprehensive introduction to the principles and practice of food science and technology in contemporary society. Major themes are the chemistry and composition of food; preservation and processing; food safety and the role of food in health and wellness. Contemporary issues including organic foods, GMOs, nanotechnology, nutrition trends, food ingredients, molecular gastronomy and food security will also be addressed. Each lecture will address popular questions(s) related to food facts and fads using a scientific approach and discussion.

Note: A background in high school 30-level sciences is recommended. Students with credit for FABS 210 or FAMS 210 will not receive credit for this course.


FABS 211.3 — 1(3L)
Introductory Bioproduct Science

Provides a general overview of the current science of bioproducts, i.e. industrial products made from renewable bioresources. The course focuses on the structure, properties and processing of bioproducts arising from oil-bearing, starchy and fibrous, and proteinaceous organic materials, as well as the issues related to the bioproduct industry.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 or permission of the instructor
Note: Offered annually.


FABS 212.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Agrifood and Resources Microbiology

An introduction to the general biology of microorganisms with emphasis on those of agrifood, economic and environmental importance. Topics include microbial morphology, metabolism, growth and genetics; infectious disease and immunity; environmental microbiology and waste water treatment; agricultural microbiology; and food and industrial microbiology. Laboratory practice in basic microbiological techniques and their application to the study of microbial activities.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of Biology and 3 credit units Chemistry or permission of the instructor
Note(s): Offered annually. Students with credit for FAMS 212, MCIM 214, or BMSC 210 will not receive credit for FABS 212.


FABS 298.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

FABS 315.3 — 1(3L-4P)
Food Chemistry

An introduction to the major chemical components of foods and the chemical and biochemical reactions that can impact these components during food processing and storage. Topics include water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, pigments (natural and synthetic), and emulsions/emulsifiers. The laboratory section consists of eleven or twelve practical sessions that support the theoretical information presented in lectures.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 200
Note: Offered annually (based on student enrolment). Students with credit for FAMS 415 will not receive credit for FABS 315.


FABS 323.3 — 2(3L)
Food Additives and Toxicants

Introduction to the types of food additives currently used in the food industry and the function(s) of these chemical compounds.The safety of food additives will be addressed as related to their toxicological information. The overarching question on the need for food additives and their safety will be presented. In addition, a selection of naturally occurring toxicants in foods will be examined and discussed.

Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 323 will not receive credit for FABS 323.


FABS 325.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Food Microbiology and Safety

Detailed examination of microorganisms and their relationship to the food supply and public safety. Theory of how intrinsic and extrinsic factors, which govern microbial proliferation in foods, affect food spoilage, food preservation and disease. Laboratories will emphasize methods and techniques for isolating, enumerating, and identifying important food-borne microbes.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 212 or BMSC 210
Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 425 will not receive credit for FABS 325


FABS 334.3 — 1(3L)
Industrial Microbiology

A study of the microbial cultures and bioprocess technologies for bioproduct synthesis and transformation by diversity of industrial microorganisms, traditional and biotechnological strain improvements, fermentation systems, immobilized cell reactors, downstream processing, product recovery, development and safety.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 212 or BMSC 210.
Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 434 will not receive credit for FABS 334.


FABS 345.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Unit Operations in Food Processing

The fundamental principles of the common unit operations of food processing and preservation are discussed with emphasis on freezing, drying, evaporation and thermal processing operations. The operating principles of equipment utilized in these operations will be examined and selected processes of unit operations studied in detail.

Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 345 will not receive credit for FABS 345.


FABS 360.3 — 1(3L)
Water Microbiology and Safety

An introduction to the principles, vocabulary and concepts associated with the provision of safe drinking water. Examination of the relationship between microbial health threats and water resources and governance, quality assessment, treatment, risk assessment and decision-making, security and global issues. Lectures will be complemented by in-class discussion and student presentations.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 212 or BMSC 210; or permission of instructor
Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 360 will not receive credit for FABS 360.


FABS 362.3 — 2(3L)
Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals

Explores aspects of nutraceuticals and functional foods derived from plant, animal and microbial origins. Global regulatory issues including efficacy and safety, health claims, value-added food production and the marketing challenges will be presented.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 60 credit units of university-level courses
Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 362 will not receive credit for FABS 362


FABS 366.3 — 2(3L)
Physicochemical Properties of Food Macromolecules

Provides insight into the basic structure-function relationships of lipids, proteins and polysaccharides in complex systems. The physicochemical, i.e. functional, properties of food and bioproducts will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 315 (formerly FAMS 415) or permission of the instructor


FABS 371.3 — 2(3L)
Food Biotechnology

Presents principles, concepts, and application of methods and process design of biotechnology related to foods and ingredients for product quality and yield. New food development from plants, animals, microorganisms and related issues of governance, regulation, safety, health, consumer and market challenges will be presented.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 60 credit units of university-level courses
Note(s): Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 271 will not receive credit for FABS 371.


FABS 398.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

FABS 401.3 — 1(3L)
Dairy Science and Technology

Examines the chemistry and processing of dairy products. Lectures will cover the fundamental aspects of milk with respect to chemistry, biochemistry, nutrition and engineering, as well as its application in a wide variety of dairy products.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 200 and FABS 110 (formerly FABS 210) or permission of the instructor.
Note: Offered in alternate years.


FABS 411.3 — 2(3L)
Lipid Science and Technology

Provides a comprehensive overview of lipid science and technology. Topics include lipid type, sources, structure, properties and food and non-food usage; lipid metabolisms and biotechnology; as well as lipid bioproducts and industrial processing technologies.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 or BMSC 200 or permission of the instructor.
Note: Offered in alternate years beginning 2011. Students with credit for FAMS 411 will not receive credit for FABS 411.


FABS 417.3 — 2(3L-4P)
Food and Bioproducts Analysis

Modern analytical techniques/instruments and their application to food analysis are presented and discussed. Basic analytical chemical principles and methodology are covered with specific emphasis on their use in answering food analysis questions. Major topics include, proximate analysis, spectroscopy, high performance liquid and gas chromatography, and mass spectroscopy. The laboratory section consists of ten or eleven practical sessions that support the theoretical information presented in lectures.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 200
Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 417 will not receive credit for FABS 417.


FABS 430.3 — 2(3L-1.5P)
Environmental Microbiology

Includes fundamentals of microbial ecology and explains basic concepts of microbial diversity and function within the environment. Covers principal biological properties and interactions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms and highlights their practical value to the environment, agriculture, soil, plants, invertebrates, public health, industry and biotechnology.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 212.3 or PLSC 213.3; or permission of the instructor.
Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 430 will not receive credit for FABS 430.


FABS 436.3 — 1(3L)
Biofuels Production

Students are provided with comprehensive theoretical and practical knowledge of the multi-disciplinary production steps leading to fuel and industrial alcohol. One four hour field trip to an industry location. Excursion fees may apply.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 212 or BMSC 210 or permission of the instructor.
Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 436 will not receive credit for FABS 436.


FABS 450.3 — 1(3L)
Anaerobic and Rumen Microbiology

A detailed examination of the rumen microbial ecosystem and other anaerobic environments. Factors which govern microbial proliferation, metabolism of plant structural and storage carbohydrates and fermentation will be discussed in the context of host ruminant nutrition.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 212 or BMSC 210; BMSC 230.
Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 450 will not receive credit for FABS 450.


FABS 452.3 — 2(3L)
Quality Assurance and HACCP

Principles of quality assurance as applied to the food industry. Theory and in-class workshops examine food regulations, analytical methods, statistical quality control, sanitation, as well as implementing and auditing the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) as well as quality assurance systems.

Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 452 will not receive credit for FABS 452.


FABS 457.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Meat Science and Technology

Fundamentals of Meat Science, including meat quality, chemistry, conversion and processing of muscle to meat and product storage will be presented. An overview of technologies used for further processing and value - addition of meats will also be discussed.

Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 457 will not receive credit for FABS 457.


FABS 460.3 — 2(3L)
Protein Science and Technology

Provides an advanced understanding of structure-dynamic-function relationships of proteins from both plant and animal sources. The emphasis will be on protein structure, protein interactions, methodologies for assessing protein functionality, protein purification and the use of proteins in novel food and bioproducts.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 315 (formerly FAMS 415) or permission of the instructor.
Note: Offered in alternate years.


FABS 474.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Food Enzymology

Examines the principles of enzyme applications in foods, food processing and food analysis. Lectures and laboratories will present the fundamentals of enzymes from biochemical, chemical, biological and engineering aspects as well as their practical applications in food science.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 200 and either FABS 212 or BMSC 210.
Note: Offered in alternate years. Students with credit for FAMS 474 will not receive credit for FABS 474.


FABS 486.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Sensory Evaluation of Food

Provides an introduction to the principles and procedures for sensory evaluation of foods through lectures and hands-on practica. Appropriate uses of specific tests will be discussed, along with data analysis and interpretation and factors that influence sensory responses. Students will also have the opportunity to carry out a small sensory evaluation trial by evaluating products for an industry client.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 110 (formerly FABS 210); PLSC 214 or STAT 245; or permission of the instructor.
Note: Offered in alternate years.


FABS 492.3 — 1&2
Literature Thesis

This is a technical writing and communication course in which the student will investigate a problem/topic in the food and bioproduct area. An extensive literature review will be made utilizing electronic and library resources and an undergraduate level dissertation will be prepared on a topic. A summation of the dissertation will be presented at the departmental seminar series. Technical writing skills and seminar preparation will be addressed in a series of lectures at the beginning of the term.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 90 credit units towards the B.S.A. in the FABS major.
Note: Students with credit for FAMS 492 will not receive credit for FABS 492.


FABS 493.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Product Development

Provides an understanding of the processes involved with developing products for food and non-food applications, stemming from the idea/concept stage, to prototype development and testing consumer acceptability. Emphasis will be placed on a team approach for effectively planning and executing the development of a new product for the marketplace.

Prerequisite(s): FABS 110 (formerly FABS 210) and FABS 212; or permission of the department.
Note: Students with credit for FAMS 493 will not receive credit for FABS 493.


FABS 494.6 — 1&2
Research Thesis

The course is restricted to students with a minimum cumulative 70% average as of January of year three. Firstly, a student develops a small research project in consultation with a faculty member at the department. Then, the student undertakes lab experiments to investigate the project. Finally, the student prepares a thesis based on the research results and delivers the presentation at the departmental seminar series. Students considering graduate studies are encouraged to take this course.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 90 credit units towards the B.S.A. in the FABS major and permission of the department head.
Note: Students with credit for FAMS 494 will not receive credit for FABS 494.


FABS 498.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.