This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2017 to April 2018.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2017-2018, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

GEOG 302.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Quantitative Methods in Geography

Content will focus on the use of statistics in geographical research and on their use in a spatial context in human and physical geography. Topics are covered in spatial and multivariate statistics. Weekly take-home labs and course content emphasize geographical subjects.

Prerequisite(s): STAT 244 or STAT 245.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 303 may not take this course for credit.


GEOG 322.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Introduces students to the use of computer-based Geographic Information Systems for the management and analysis of spatial data for map production. Topics include vector and raster data structures, spatial data acquisition, geo-referencing, spatial interpolation, overlay analysis, and modelling. Students obtain practical experience with Geographical Information Systems through a series of exercises.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 222; or 99 credit units of University course work; or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 412 may not take this course for credit. GEOG 412 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.


GEOG 323.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Remote Sensing

Advanced lectures, seminars and laboratories for those specializing in resource and environmental studies. It includes inductive and deductive evaluation of air photo patterns and the interpretation of multi-spectral imagery and remote sensing imagery.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 222; or 99 credit units of University course work; or permission of the instructor.


GEOG 325.3 — 1/2(3L)
Principles of Fluvial Systems

Processes responsible for the spatial variability of available water resources are introduced and investigated analytically. Topics covered will provide an explanation of the patterns of precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, snowmelt and stream flow.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 225; or 12 credit units in GEOL.


GEOG 328.3 — 2(3L)
Groundwater Hydrology

Groundwater is the largest source of readily accessible freshwater. This course provides a rigorous understanding of subsurface hydrological processes and covers fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater and soil water in the hydrological cycle, and groundwater-surface water interactions.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 225; or 12 credit units of GEOL.


GEOG 333.3 — 1/2(3L)
Global Climate Change

Earth’s climate is constantly changing in response to influences forced upon it by natural systems and human actions. It is expected that current and future climate changes will have a strong influence on human populations, society, and development. This course will describe how humans predict future climate changes and how we can mitigate or adapt to those changes. Major topics discussed in this course will focus on the politics and economics of climate change and how these can help, or hinder, our attempts to manage climate change. More direct attempts, through geoengineering and weather modification, will be addressed as well.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 233 or permission of the instructor
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 398.3 Climate Change may not take this course for credit


GEOG 335.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Glacial Geomorphology

Examines the role of continental and alpine glaciation in shaping Canadian landscapes throughout the Quaternary period. Topics include glaciology and glacier flow, glacial processes and landforms, Milankovitch cycles and Quaternary ice sheet dynamics in North America, and glacio-eustasy and glacio-isostasy.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 235; or 12 credit units in GEOL, GEOE, EVSC, or SLSC.
Note: Students with credit for GEOL 312 may not take this course for credit. GEOL 312 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.


GEOG 340.3
European Heritage of our Built Environment

A field study on urban design and city-form in Central Europe, providing a historical review of architectural styles preserved at Prague and elsewhere in Bohemia. Gothic and Baroque styles are emphasized, particularly as they relate to street and square design.

Prerequisite(s): PLAN 342 or 346 or 12 credit units of Social Science and/or Humanities.
Note: This course is offered as a study-abroad opportunity only.


GEOG 351.3 — 1/2(3L)
Northern Environments

A multidisciplinary study of the biophysical environments of the circumpolar North. Examines the processes operating at the Earth's surface and within the atmosphere and hydrosphere and their role in structuring northern ecosystems. Writing exercises and/or research projects will permit students with background preparation in the humanities, social sciences and the sciences to assess the impact of human activity on northern environments.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in science; or permission of the instructor.
Note: GEOG 120 or NRTH 101 recommended.


GEOG 352.3 — 1(3L)
Contemporary Issues of the Circumpolar World I

Introduces students to the important structures and forces affecting the sustainability of circumpolar communities. Students will deal with the population trends in the circumpolar region, natural resource use and the economies of these communities and economic ownership.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 150 (formerly NRTH 101) and 24 credit units at the university including at least 6 credit units senior social sciences.
Note: Students with credit for NRTH 331 will not receive credit for this course.


GEOG 364.3 — 1/2(3L)
Geography of Environment and Health

Explores the ways in which human-environment interactions impact on human health and disease. The goal of this course is to help students understand and assess the nature and variation across space of major environmental risks to health, and to learn how such risks may be prevented or managed.

Formerly: GEOG 314.
Prerequisite(s): GEOG 130 and 280.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 314 may not take this course for credit.


GEOG 372.0
Work Experience II

A 4-month cooperative work term for students in the Cooperative Education Option in the Environment & Society program.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 272.


GEOG 373.0
Work Experience III

A 4-month cooperative work term for students in the Cooperative Education Option in the Environment & Society program.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 372.


GEOG 379.3
Washington Center Topics in Geography

Covers topics in Geography, offered by the Washington Center, Washington D.C. Topics approved by the Department of Geography and Planning will vary from year to year.

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units of university level study including 6 credit units senior GEOG.
Note: Registration in this course is restricted to students selected for the Washington Center Term Abroad program.


GEOG 380.3 — 1/2(3L)
Environmental Geography of the Circumpolar North

This course will focus on four themes of contemporary circumpolar northern environments: natural resources and their use in terrestrial and aquatic environments; infrastructure in the North; pollution in terrestrial and aquatic environments; and conservation of natural resources.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of Science courses; or permission of the instructor.
Note: Previous completion of at least 3 credit units selected from BIOL 121; GEOG 125 or GEOG 280; GEOL 121; GEOG 150 is recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 312 or NRTH 312 may not receive credit for this course. This course previously labeled BIOL 312 and NRTH 312.


GEOG 381.3 — 1/2
Development in the Canadian North Issues and Challenges

Explores the importance of the Canadian North to the Canadian Identity and examines the issues and challenges facing the region. Major topics include resource development, environmental issues, community development, and the evolving role of First Nations, Métis and Inuit in the decision-making process.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 280; or permission of the instructor.
Note: This course is offered online through the Centre for Continuing and Distance Education only.


GEOG 385.3 — 1/2(3L)
Analysis of Environmental Management and Policy Making

An examination of various approaches to environmental management. Emphasis is placed on environmental policy making and management strategies pertinent in a western context. Analytical frameworks used to understand how policies are developed and implemented are also introduced.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 280 or permission of the instructor.


GEOG 386.3 — 1/2(3L)
Environmental Impact Assessment

A practical and theoretical introduction to environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment. Emphasis is placed on the principles and characteristics of impact assessment as set out under Canadian and Saskatchewan guidelines and legislation, and on the lessons learned from selected case studies.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 280 or permission of the instructor.


GEOG 390.3 — 1(L-P)
Methods in Hydrometeorology

Introduces a variety of field and laboratory approaches, methodologies and techniques that find frequent application in physical geography. Field projects will be undertaken to collect data for analysis, evaluation and presentation.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): GEOG 290; and one of GEOG 225, GEOG 233, or GEOG 328.
Note: There are costs in addition to tuition fees. Details available from the Department.


GEOG 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

GEOG 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.