This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

GEOG GR

GEOG 120.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Introduction to Global Environmental Systems

An introduction to the principles, processes and interactions in the earth's physical environment with a particular emphasis on the flow of energy and matter within global environmental systems. Topics include global radiation and energy balances, atmospheric and oceanic processes, the hydrological cycle, earth surface processes and biogeochemical cycling. Case studies are introduced to illustrate the interaction between human activity and the natural environment.

Note: A background in high school sciences at the 30-level is recommended. GEOG 120 is acceptable under requirement one of program type C.


GEOG 125.3 — 1/2(3L)
Environmental Science and Society

Studies the Earth's life-support systems and explores the consequences of human activity. Key themes include examining global ecosystem processes, human interconnections, as well as applications of information from the Earth Sciences.

Note:A background in high school sciences at the 30-level is recommended. GEOG 125 is a required cognate course in the B.A.& Sc. program in Environment & Society. GEOG 125 may be used to satisfy the science requirement in program types A, B, and D.


GEOG 130.3 — 1/2(3L)
Space Place and Society An Introduction to Human Geography

Exposes students to human geography using a thematic approach. It is designed to stimulate a geographical imagination among students who are interested in understanding "how the world turns" by focusing on how nature, culture, and human actions shape places, regions, and the relationships and interactions among them.

Note: Students with credit for GEOG 113 or 114 may not take this course for credit.


GEOG 202.3 — 1/2
Regional Geography of Canada

Presents an analysis of the evolution of Canada and describes the physical, historical, economic and cultural bases of the various regions of Canada.

Prerequisite(s): 24 credit units of university course work.
Note: This course is offered online through the Centre for Continuing and Distance Education only.


GEOG 204.3 — 1/2
Geography of the Prairie Region

Presents an analysis of the physical, historical, economic and social geography of the three Prairie Provinces. The processes of settlement, resource development, and urban growth will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): 24 credit units of university course work.
Note: This course is offered online through the Centre for Continuing and Distance Education only.


GEOG 208.3 — 1/2
World Regional Development

The regions of the world face a series of development problems. These problems are examined in terms of development theory and their spatial consequences. The implications for global, national and regional planning are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): 24 credit units of university course work.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 281 may not take this course for credit. GEOG 281 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012. GEOG 208 is offered online through the Centre for Continuing and Distance Education only.


GEOG 222.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Introduction to Geomatics

Introduction to the skills for reading maps, air photos and satellite images is provided, along with an introduction to computer-based cartography, image analysis and enhancement, and Geographic Information Systems.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of Science courses and 21 credit units of additional University course work.


GEOG 225.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Hydrology of Canada

The geographic distribution of hydrologic processes in Canada is examined. The types of processes and their rates of operation are related to regional physical environments.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of Science courses and 21 credit units of additional University course work.
Note: GEOG 120 is recommended.


GEOG 233.3 — 1(3L)
Introduction to Weather and Climate

An examination of the elements of weather and climate including the composition and thermal structure of the atmosphere; radiation and energy balances; global circulation; air masses; fronts and atmospheric disturbances; and climates of the world.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of Science courses and 21 credit units of additional University course work.
Note: GEOG 120 is recommended.


GEOG 235.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Earth Processes and Natural Hazards A Canadian Perspective

Earth Processes and Natural Hazards: A Canadian Perspective. This interdisciplinary course explores the earth and atmospheric processes that are responsible for landform development and natural hazards, the regions in Canada most susceptible to natural disasters, and current developments in hazard forecasting and monitoring techniques. Students will explore through case studies the impacts of natural disasters on Canadian landscapes and people. Lastly, the course explores ways to lessen the impacts of natural disasters through risk perception, assessment, and preparedness, and mitigation strategies.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 120 or GEOL 121 or permission of the instructor.


GEOG 240.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sustainable Cities and Regions

Uses the pillars of sustainable development- economic, social/cultural, environmental - as an organizing framework for the study of cities and regions in which they are embedded. Historical and contemporary thought in the fields of urban/economic, social/cultural, and environmental geography form the substance of this course.

Prerequisite(s): 24 credit units of university course work.
Note: GEOG 130 is recommended. Students with credit for GEOG 249 may not take this course for credit.


GEOG 271.3 — 1/2(3L)
Regional Biogeography

A regional treatment of world plant communities emphasizing vegetation types, environmental parameters, faunal assemblages, and modification by human activities.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of Science courses and 21 credit units of additional University course work.
Note: GEOG 120 is recommended.


GEOG 272.0
Work Experience I

A 4-month cooperative work term for students in the Cooperative Education Option in the Environment & Society program.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of minimum 54 and maximum 84 credit units of course work.
Note: See also specific eligibility criteria for the Environment & Society program in the Arts and Science Programs section of the Course and Program Catalogue.


GEOG 273.3 — 1(3L)
Principles of Biogeography

Focuses on the geography of plants including the environmental control of plant distributions; the collection, analysis and presentation of vegetation data; and the functional and historical aspects of plant communities.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 271 or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 270 may not take this course for credit.


GEOG 280.3 — 1/2(3L)
Environmental Geography

An introduction to the geographic perspectives on resources and the environment. This course introduces environmental geography as an integrative science to explore the relationships between human and physical systems.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of GEOG courses and 21 credit units of additional University course work.
Note: Geography majors are encouraged to take GEOG 120 and 130 before registering in this course. GEOG 280 is a Social Science course but may be used to satisfy the Science requirement for the following Program Types in the College of Arts and Science: A (Humanities), B (Social Science), D (Fine Arts), E (B.F.A. in Studio Art), F (B.F.A. in Drama), and G (B.Mus.).


GEOG 290.3 — 1(1L-4P-1T)
Field Methods and Laboratory Analysis

An introduction to the principles and practice of navigation, topographic surveying, image analysis, and the sampling and analysis of sediments, water, and plant communities relevant to environmental science. There will be costs related to the field and laboratory exercises in addition to tuition fees for this course.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of Science courses and 21 credit units of additional University course work.
Note: GEOG 120 is recommended.


GEOG 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

GEOG 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

GEOG 302.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Quantitative Methods in Geography

Content will focus on the use of statistics in geographical research and on their use in a spatial context in human and physical geography. Topics are covered in spatial and multivariate statistics. Weekly take-home labs and course content emphasize geographical subjects.

Prerequisite(s): STAT 244 or STAT 245.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 303 may not take this course for credit.


GEOG 322.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Introduces students to the use of computer-based Geographic Information Systems for the management and analysis of spatial data for map production. Topics include vector and raster data structures, spatial data acquisition, geo-referencing, spatial interpolation, overlay analysis, and modelling. Students obtain practical experience with Geographical Information Systems through a series of exercises.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 222; or 99 credit units of University course work; or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 412 may not take this course for credit. GEOG 412 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.


GEOG 323.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Remote Sensing

Advanced lectures, seminars and laboratories for those specializing in resource and environmental studies. It includes inductive and deductive evaluation of air photo patterns and the interpretation of multi-spectral imagery and remote sensing imagery.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 222; or 99 credit units of University course work; or permission of the instructor.


GEOG 325.3 — 1/2(3L)
Principles of Fluvial Systems

Processes responsible for the spatial variability of available water resources are introduced and investigated analytically. Topics covered will provide an explanation of the patterns of precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, snowmelt and stream flow.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 225; or 12 credit units in GEOL.


GEOG 328.3 — 2(3L)
Groundwater Hydrology

Groundwater is the largest source of readily accessible freshwater. This course provides a rigorous understanding of subsurface hydrological processes and covers fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater and soil water in the hydrological cycle, and groundwater-surface water interactions.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 225; or 12 credit units of GEOL.


GEOG 335.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Glacial Geomorphology

Examines the role of continental and alpine glaciation in shaping Canadian landscapes throughout the Quaternary period. Topics include glaciology and glacier flow, glacial processes and landforms, Milankovitch cycles and Quaternary ice sheet dynamics in North America, and glacio-eustasy and glacio-isostasy.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 235; or 12 credit units in GEOL, GEOE, EVSC, or SLSC.
Note: Students with credit for GEOL 312 may not take this course for credit. GEOL 312 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.


GEOG 340.3
European Heritage of our Built Environment

A field study on urban design and city-form in Central Europe, providing a historical review of architectural styles preserved at Prague and elsewhere in Bohemia. Gothic and Baroque styles are emphasized, particularly as they relate to street and square design.

Prerequisite(s): PLAN 342 or 346 or 12 credit units of Social Science and/or Humanities.
Note: This course is offered as a study-abroad opportunity only.


GEOG 351.3 — 1/2(3L)
Northern Environments

A multidisciplinary study of the biophysical environments of the circumpolar North. Examines the processes operating at the Earth's surface and within the atmosphere and hydrosphere and their role in structuring northern ecosystems. Writing exercises and/or research projects will permit students with background preparation in the humanities, social sciences and the sciences to assess the impact of human activity on northern environments.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in science; or permission of the instructor.
Note: GEOG 120 or NRTH 101 recommended.


GEOG 364.3 — 1/2(3L)
Geography of Environment and Health

Explores the ways in which human-environment interactions impact on human health and disease. The goal of this course is to help students understand and assess the nature and variation across space of major environmental risks to health, and to learn how such risks may be prevented or managed.

Formerly: GEOG 314.
Prerequisite(s): GEOG 130 and 280.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 314 may not take this course for credit.


GEOG 372.0
Work Experience II

A 4-month cooperative work term for students in the Cooperative Education Option in the Environment & Society program.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 272.


GEOG 373.0
Work Experience III

A 4-month cooperative work term for students in the Cooperative Education Option in the Environment & Society program.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 372.


GEOG 379.3
Washington Center Topics in Geography

Covers topics in Geography, offered by the Washington Center, Washington D.C. Topics approved by the Department of Geography and Planning will vary from year to year.

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units of university level study including 6 credit units senior GEOG.
Note: Registration in this course is restricted to students selected for the Washington Center Term Abroad program.


GEOG 381.3 — 1/2
Development in the Canadian North Issues and Challenges

Explores the importance of the Canadian North to the Canadian Identity and examines the issues and challenges facing the region. Major topics include resource development, environmental issues, community development, and the evolving role of First Nations, M├ętis and Inuit in the decision-making process.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 280; or permission of the instructor.
Note: This course is offered online through the Centre for Continuing and Distance Education only.


GEOG 385.3 — 1/2(3L)
Analysis of Environmental Management and Policy Making

An examination of various approaches to environmental management. Emphasis is placed on environmental policy making and management strategies pertinent in a western context. Analytical frameworks used to understand how policies are developed and implemented are also introduced.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 280 or permission of the instructor.


GEOG 386.3 — 1/2(3L)
Environmental Impact Assessment

A practical and theoretical introduction to environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment. Emphasis is placed on the principles and characteristics of impact assessment as set out under Canadian and Saskatchewan guidelines and legislation, and on the lessons learned from selected case studies.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 280 or permission of the instructor.


GEOG 390.3 — 1(L-P)
Field Methods in Physical Geography

Introduces a variety of field and laboratory approaches, methodologies and techniques that find frequent application in physical geography. Field projects will be undertaken to collect data for analysis, evaluation and presentation.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): GEOG 120 and 6 credit units at the 200-level in physical geography. GEOG 280 may be used as one of the prerequisites for this course.
Note: This one-week field camp is required for all Honours students, and recommended for all Four-years Majors, in physical geography. It is held in the first week of the Fall term. Permission of the instructor is required before May 31. Application forms are available from the Department in March. A preliminary meeting is held in March. There are costs in addition to tuition fees. Details available from the Department.


GEOG 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

GEOG 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

GEOG 420.3 — 1/2(3L-3P)
Cartography and Professional Communication

History of map making, map projections; relief representation, graphics and statistical mapping, drafting, map design and map reproduction, analysis of map series and sources.

Prerequisite(s): One of GEOG 302, GEOG 322, or GEOG 323; or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 320 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled GEOG 320 until 2016.


GEOG 423.3 — 1/2(2L-1S-2P)
Advanced Remote Sensing

Deals with advanced remote sensing techniques including satellite imagery calibration, spectral data transformation and land use cover classification, and detection of environmental change. The course consists of three interrelated components: lectures, laboratory exercises and group projects.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 323.


GEOG 427.3 — 1(3L-2T)
Advanced Hydrology

Examines the physical principles governing hydrological processes. Topics covered include precipitation, interception, snow accumulation, snowmelt, evaporation, infiltration, groundwater movement, flood and drought frequency analysis and stream flow. Lectures and tutorials with hydrology instrumentation will be supplemented by problem solving assignments and an essay.

Prerequisite(s): One of MATH 110 or MATH 123 or MATH 125; one of EVSC 210 or PHYS 115 or GE 124; GEOG 225.


GEOG 464.3 — 2(3L)
Geography of Health

Provides students with an introduction to health geography, examining the development of the subdiscipline and its potential contributions as an approach for health-related research. It considers the ecological relationship between humans and disease, as well as the spatial patterns of health and health care. Additionally, lectures and readings will explore the use of geographic techniques and tools, including cartography, GIS and remote sensing, in health studies. In addition to the lectures and in-class discussions, a variety of supplemental readings will be assigned.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of GEOG courses with at least 3 credit units at the 300-level


GEOG 472.0
Work Experience IV

A 4-month cooperative work term for students in the Cooperative Education Option in the Environment & Society program.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 373.


GEOG 490.3 — 1/2(2L-2T)
Selected Topics in Physical Geography

Students will work on theoretical or practical research projects under the supervision of a faculty member. An outline of the project must be submitted to the course coordinator in the term preceding registration and be approved before Departmental permission will be granted. An oral presentation and written report submitted at the end of the project will be evaluated by a faculty committee.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): One of GEOG 325, GEOG 328, GEOG 335, GEOG 351, GEOG 427 or GEOG 435; and GEOG 390.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): GEOG 302.


GEOG 491.3 — 1/2(3L)
Research Topics in Human Geography

Students will work on theoretical or practical research projects under the supervision of a faculty member. An outline of the project must be submitted to the course coordinator in the term preceding registration and be approved before Departmental permission will be granted. An oral presentation and written report submitted at the end of the project will be evaluated by a faculty committee.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): One of GEOG 340, GEOG 241, GEOG 364, GEOG 379, GEOG 381, GEOG 385, GEOG 386, GEOG 464, GEOG 486, PLAN 329, PLAN 341, PLAN 343, PLAN 346, PLAN 350, PLAN 441, PLAN 445, PLAN 446; and GEOG 391 or PLAN 390.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): GEOG 302.


GEOG 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

GEOG 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

GEOG 803.3 — 1/2(S)
Research in Geography

The purpose of this course is to introduce graduate students to theoretical and practical issues in geographical research. Its specific objective is to demonstrate and promote professional practices in geography culminating in a research plan that will serve as the basis for developing a graduate research proposal.

Note: Required for M.A., M.Sc. and Ph.D. students.


GEOG 822.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Geographic Information Science

Geographic Information Science is the systematic study and theory of digital representations of the Earth, and the processes that can be applied to that information. Students will explore contemporary theory and research in GIScience to better understand how technology can be used for geographic inquiry.

Prerequisite(s): Training in GIS, Cartography, or related technical or theoretical area.


GEOG 823.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Field and Laboratory Techniques in Remote Sensing

There are three major parts to this course: class discussion, field data collection, and a research project. A topic is assigned for weekly in-class discussion. One time field data collection will be arranged including using spectroradiometer and LAI-2000 instruments. Each student must finish a research project.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 423 or permission of the department.


GEOG 827.3 — 1/2(1L-2S)
Principles of Hydrology

A seminar course designed to explore recent developments in hydrology. Topics to be covered at the discretion of the instructor.

GEOG 840.3 — 1/2(1L-2S)
Problems in Transportation

The examination of current research themes and problems in transportation geography. Alternate topics may be covered to reflect student needs.

GEOG 845.3 — 1/2(2L)
Advanced Urban Geography

A survey of various theories of social and policy planning and their application to the geographical organization and planning of Canadian communities. The emphasis of this course lies on the links between political, economic and social processes within urban areas.

GEOG 880.3 — 1/2(3S)
Environmental Geographies

Introduces a range of philosophical perspectives, topical issues, and methodological approaches to studies in environmental geography. Considers research focused on applied research about management strategies and policy making as well as theoretical work focused on politics associated with environmental problems. Also examines possible synergies between the two.

Permission of instructor required.


GEOG 886.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Environmental Impact Assessment

A project-based course focusing on emerging concepts and broader applications of environmental assessment principles and practices. Course topics varying from year to year following developments in the field, and may include such topics as cumulative effects assessment, strategic environmental assessment, project scooping, assessment methods and techniques, monitoring and follow-up.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 386; or 6 credit units in advanced environmental management; or permission of the instructor.


GEOG 898.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

A reading course for graduate students focusing on areas for which there is no regular graduate course or for making up the deficiencies in the research program.

GEOG 899.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

GEOG 990
Departmental Seminar

During residence, candidates will register in GEOG 990 and will present at least one paper based on their own research (likely thesis research).

GEOG 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

GEOG 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.