This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

HIST 110.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Landmarks of Ancient History

Themes of Near Eastern history; Greek and Hellenistic experiments in politics and thought; Rome from city-state to world-state; Christianity in a pagan world.

Note: Students with credit for HIST 114 or INTS 101.12 may not take this course for credit.
Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 111.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Landmarks of Medieval History

The heirs of Rome; Charlemagne; Vikings, Magyars and the rise of feudalism; peasant life; Islam and the Crusades; the rise of France; the twelfth century renaissance; the Holy Roman Empire; the age of Pope Innocent III; medieval women; chivalry, castles and cathedrals; the late middle ages.

Note: Students with credit for HIST 114 or INTS 101.12 may not take this course for credit.
Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 115.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
History Matters Ideas and Culture

Courses in this series examine how history has shaped—and been shaped by—human thought and culture. They might examine how the ideas of intellectuals, philosophers, writers, artists, or religious thinkers related to historical developments such as the spread of Christianity or Islam; the rise of modern secularism; or the various revolutionary movements of the modern world, whether political, economic, social, or artistic. They might examine elite, middle-brow, or popular culture for clues about how past societies responded to the realities of being human — birth, illness, death, the need to work, prepare food, raise children, establish communities, or make sense of one’s place in the universe. Examples of courses: “An Introduction to Modern European Thought and Culture,” “Religious Reformations of the 16th Century,” “A Global History of Food and Eating.” All courses emphasize how historians have understood the relationship between ideas, culture, and historical change.

Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 120.6 — 1&2(3L-1T)
History of Europe from Renaissance to Present

A survey of significant forces in modern Europe from the 15th century; the shaping of the modern world; the concentration of political power and the expansion of Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries; the liberal experiment in the 19th century; the 20th-century dilemma.

Formerly: HIST 112.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 121, HIST 122, or INTS 101.12 may not take this course for credit.
Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 121.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Europe to Modern Age 1348 to 1789

The Black Death; Renaissance and Reformation; the wars of the seventeenth century; the rise of modern science; the agricultural revolution; the Enlightenment.

Note: Students with credit for HIST 112, HIST 120, or INTS 101.12 may not take this course for credit.
Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 122.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Europe in Age of Mass Culture 1789 to Present

Population growth; the age of political revolutions; Romantics and Liberals; nationalism and socialism; the industrial revolution; towards gender equality; the two World Wars and the Cold War; towards economic and political integration.

Note: Students with credit for HIST 112, HIST 120, or INTS 101.12 may not take this course for credit.
Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7


HIST 125.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
History Matters Indigenous Colonial and Post colonial Histories

Courses in this series examine the peoples and processes shaping indigenous societies, their imperial rulers, and the postcolonial experience. Topics will range from local case studies of First Nations to broader histories of European imperial expansion and national independence movements. The problems of identity, power and policy are at the forefront of these investigations, emphasizing the ways that communities accepted, resisted or transformed colonial agendas. Courses will also foreground variations among colonizing projects, and responses to them, in different eras. Examples of course foci include Britain and British Empires since Caesar, the Arab Spring, the scramble for Africa, aboriginal activism in Canada, USA, and Australia, a global history of slavery, perspectives on community and sovereignty in North America, and colonial Latin America. All courses will emphasize how historians have understood different practices of colonization and their relationship to political, economic and social change.

Attention:A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 135.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
History Matters Gender Sex and Society

Courses in this series examine how histories of gender, sex and society have interacted and evolved throughout time. We will explore how, in various societies, social, cultural, political, legal, and medical views of gender and sexuality have both regulated gender and sexual norms and acted as levers of change. Topics include national and transnational histories of sexuality, gender and social change (in the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia). Possible areas of exploration include: media and cultural depictions of masculinity and femininity; medical, legal, cultural, and theoretical discourses on gender and sexuality; race, class, ethnicity, and indigeneity; gendered performance and geographies of sexual possibilities; demographic continuities and change; artistic representations of sexuality and gender; and, finally, histories of the family, of labour, of migration, as well as of activism, resistance, and repression as they intersect with the history of gender and sexuality.

Attention:A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 145.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
History Matters War Violence and Politics

Courses in this series examine the history of war and violence, cutting across periods and historical specializations. Areas of exploration may include the factors that have shaped human conflict (social, cultural, political, and religious); specific cases, campaigns or systems of conflict (including interpersonal, intergroup, and international violence); wars hot and cold; historic forms of oppression and injustice, and their relationship to conflict; and the history of resistance to interpersonal, intergroup and systemic violence including the history of peace and reconciliation and non-violent movements.

Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 151.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Canadian History from Pre Contact Period to 1867

A survey of the history of Canada from the pre-contact period until 1867, emphasizing social, cultural, economic, political, constitutional, and external policy developments.

Note: Students with credit for HIST 150 and/or HIST 206 or INTS 101.12 or HIST 255 may not take this course for credit.
Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 152.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Post Confederation Canada

A survey of the history of Canada since Confederation, emphasizing social, cultural, economic, political, constitutional, and external policy developments.

Note: Students with credit for HIST 150 and/or HIST 206 or INTS 101.12 or HIST 256 may not take this course for credit.
Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 155.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
History Matters Science and Environment

Courses in this series examine the history and conceptualization of science, the cosmos, or the environment and their relationships to society and culture. The term science is understood broadly to include not only modern science but pre-modern and non-western approaches to understanding and manipulating the natural world. Historians focus on the human history of the environment, with a particular attention to the ever-changing relationship between societies and their ecosystems. Possible areas of exploration might include: the scientific revolution; North-American environmental history; global commodities, imperialism and the environment; and science, magic, and rationality. With reference to historical examples, these courses will seek to nuance concepts such as ‘science’, ‘rationality’, and ‘nature’ and also to examine broad conventional historical narratives such as ‘disenchantment’, ‘enlightenment’, ‘industrialization’ or ‘globalization’.

Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 165.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
History Matters Health and Society

Courses in this series examine how historians have understood the complex relationship between health, society, and historical change. Health is used as a vehicle for understanding political, social and cultural change throughout history. Topics range from antiquity the birth of Galenic healing through western and non-western traditions that have guided our understandings of bodies, pain, gender, and power and into the modern era of health and medicine with the rise of professional medicine, ethics, experimentation and institutionalized healing. Health is widely defined to capture experiences that fall outside the traditional doctor-patient relationship, and to explore issues including: mental health; the politics of healthcare; health economies; the health professions; disease’s power to shape human history. These courses rely on a variety of sources: food and nutrition, to medical treatises, patient narratives, activist and anti-medical establishment texts, artwork, and institutional reports, and a rich historical tradition of examining health and medicine and its influence on human history. Possible areas of exploration include: madness; the body; pain; health and disease.

Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 170.6 — 1&2(3L-1T)
The Americas

A comparative exploration of the history of Canada, the United States, and Latin America from Pre-Columbian societies to the present, focusing on ethnic and class conflict, gender roles, slavery, the role of religion and the struggle for democracy.

Formerly: HIST 113.
Note: Students with credit for INTS 101.12 may not take this course for credit.
Attention: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 175.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
History Matters Identities and Communities in Transition

Courses in this series examine the complexity of identity and the ever-changing and complicated nature of community through an exploration of history. Identities are never ‘fixed’ and constructed in isolation; they are always both ‘invented’ and the result of historical change. Communities are similarly complex: never autonomous, always shaped by history and the interplay between internal dynamics and relationships with forces outside of the community. All courses in this series are linked through their exploration of the history of identities and communities but they explore that history in different places and times. Some courses will take a micro-level view, exploring the history of identity in one particular location or community over time and relating those changes to broader perspectives; others will look at the way broad historical forces shaped identities. Possible areas of exploration may include: historical roots and myths surrounding ‘tribalism’ in Africa and the contemporary impacts of this discourse; the spread nationalism in the 18th and 19th centuries and the rise of the modern nation-state; how such groups as Kurds have been able to maintain a distinct identity over time; Quebec’s status as a separate ‘nation’ in Canada

Attention:A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 202.3 — 1/2(3L)
Formation of Europe 300 to 1000

A history of the West from the Christianization of the Roman Empire in the fourth century to the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire in the tenth century. Themes include: the survival of Romanitas, monasticism and the western Church, the barbarian kingdoms, the Carolingian Renaissance, and the rise of feudalism.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 203.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ancient Greece Politics Society and Culture

This course surveys the political, cultural and social history of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age (ca. 3000 BCE) to the beginnings of Roman influence in the Greek world in the late Hellenistic period (ca 200 BCE).

Prerequisite(s): 30 credit units of University courses.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 200.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 205.3 — 1/2(3L)
Europe and World in High Middle Ages 1000 to 1300

Cluny and the Gregorian reform; the rise of feudal monarchy; Byzantium, Islam and the Crusades; twelfth century renaissance; universities and scholasticism; new forms of religious life; the peasantry; medieval women; the Holy Roman Empire and the Papacy; castles and cathedrals; feudal monarchies.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 212 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 207.3 — 1/2(3L)
Greek Tragedy and the Culture of Fifth Century Athens

An examination of the dramatic, literary, social, and intellectual contexts that inform fifth-century Athenian tragedy.

Prerequisite(s): (3 credit units HIST, CLAS, or ENG), or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 208.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Roman Republic Growth of a Mediterranean State 753 to 27 BCE

This course examines the early history of ancient Rome and its domination of the ancient Mediterranean world, chronologically spanning the foundation of Rome in 753 BCE to the end of the Republic at the Battle of Actium in 30BCE. Two over arching questions will shape our investigation: what internal and external factors allowed Rome to extend its empire first over Italy and then over the Mediterranean basin? Why did the government of Rome by the SPQR - senate and people of Rome – the system called the Republic- ultimately fail and fall to civil war and monarchy established by Julius Caesar and his successors? Seeking answers to these questions will entail the exploration not only of events and actors in Roman history but the underlying political and social factors that shaped Rome: Rome’s political system; its ideas about family; aristocratic competition; economy, agriculture and slavery; the roman army and society; the city of Rome and urban violence; the nature of roman imperialism.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 201.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 209.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Roman Empire Politics Society and Culture Augustus to Constantine

This course examines Rome under the rule of emperors, its chronological frame extending from circa 27 BCE to the time of Constantine in the 4th c CE. The first part of the course focuses on the establishment monarchy – the rule of emperors- at Rome during the age of Augustus and the Julio-Claudians, since many features of imperial rule were fixed in this time, such as the emperor’s relations with the senate, the role of the members of the imperial household in the management of power, the nature of imperial patronage, and the diffusion of the imperial image. We will then turn to examine the effects of empire on the ruled at Rome and in the provinces, focusing on issues such Roman military and administrative presence in the provinces, economic exploitation, and the diffusion of Roman style spectacles and religious cult.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 201.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 210.3 — 1/2(3L)
France's Colonial Legacy The Rise and Fall of a Global Empire

This course is a sweeping study of the history of French colonialism from the first colonies in the Americas to decolonization in Africa and Southeast Asia. Spanning five centuries, this course provides an opportunity to examine how empire building changed over time, both for the colonizer and the colonized. France built an extensive empire in North America during the 17th and 18th centuries only to see most of it lost to their British imperial rival. And yet, by the mid-19th century France was rebuilding its empire, this time in Africa and Southeast Asia. Between its two overseas empires France left a remarkable legacy that can still be felt today in the 25 countries where French is an official language. The weekly lectures and readings explore a variety of historical themes to help understand the French colonial legacy, such as theories of imperialism, discovery, native-newcomer relations, empire and conquest, religion, slavery, women and gender, commerce and decolonization.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level or INTS 101 or 30 credit units of university courses
Note: North America or Other Regions.


HIST 212.3 — 1/2(3L)
History Society and Culture in Paris The City of Light

Students in this intensive and bilingual experiential-learning course learn about the history of Paris--and of France--by exploring some of the city's most significant monuments, buildings, museums, gardens, and neighborhoods. Site visits include Notre Dame cathedral and the historic Ile de la Cité where the city was born; the Palace of Versailles; the Place de la Bastille and its environs; the "Grands Boulevards" with their nineteenth-century shopping arcades, storied department stores, and nearby Opéra Garnier; Montmartre and the Sacré-Coeur basilica; as well as places linked to the German occupation during WW2, to Parisian intellectual and cultural life, and to the history of immigrant, working-class, and minority groups in the city or suburbs.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 125 or 3 credit units 100-Level HIST or permission of the instructor.
Note: Europe and Great Britain


HIST 214.3 — 1/2(3L)
History in Film

A survey of various film portrayals of historical individuals and culture. Popular ideas about the past are largely a creation of fiction writers' and film directors' depictions of the past. This course focuses on historical figures and their representation in primary sources, literature, and film. In this context, students consider several broad themes, including historicity and authenticity, contemporary appropriations of past ideals or ideologies. Through the study of primary source texts and related films, the student will explore the many interpretations of past culture and the ways in which historical ideas, figures and events have been used as commentaries on modern issues. May be taken more than once for credit if the subjects differ sufficiently. Consult with department for details.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 217.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Early Byzantine Empire circa 285 to 565 CE from Constantine to Justinian

In this course meet the Late Roman Empire as it transitions from the Classical Era into “Late Antiquity.” We begin with the Reforms of Diocletian in response to the near fatal “crisis of the third century.” We study the Roman Empire’s shift its center of balance from Italy and the West to the urbanized and Greek speaking East. With the conversion of Constantine and the coming of Imperial Christianity the basic structures of Byzantine civilization arise. The reign of Justinian and Theodora represent the acme of early Byzantium with the codification of the Roman Law, the building of Hagia Sophia and Justinian’s gamble on the re-conquest of the lost provinces of the former western Roman Empire.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note: Pre-1815; Other Regions. Students with credit for HIST 215.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 218.3 — 1/2(3L)
Byzantium and the World 565 to 1453

Despite the collapse of the former western Roman Empire, the Eastern Roman (or “Byzantine” Empire) weathers fresh challenges presented by the rise of new peoples. These include the Slavs, Bulgars, Arabs united in Islam, Turks, and Normans as well as a resurgent Latin West under the leadership of the Pope. While medieval Byzantium begins to collapse under the pressure of its enemies, its vibrant culture, both in its religious expression as “Orthodoxy” and its secular expression as “Hellenism,” make the later Byzantine Empire a significant cultural and intellectual influence on the world from Orthodox Russia to the revival of Classical Studies in the Italian Renaissance.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note: Pre-1815; Other Regions. Students with credit for HIST 215.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 221.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sub Roman Anglo Saxon and Viking Britain 400 to 1066

This course examines the period from the departure of the Romans through to the coming of the Normans. It was an epoch that saw the gradual conversion of the peoples of the British Isles to Christianity and (with the exception of Ireland) the redrawing of the ethnic and political map of the islands. The following three centuries from 800 to 1100 A.D., from the Vikings incursions of the ninth century through to the Norman Conquest of England were a highly formative period in the history of the Isles, witnessing the emergence of England and Scotland as identifiable political entities.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 213.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 222.3 — 1/2(3L)
Medieval England 1000 to 1500

Beginning in the long twelfth century with the Norman Conquest of England, through to the War of the Roses and the rise of the Tudors in the late fifteenth century, this course provides an integrated history of England in the medieval period. Examining in detail the issues of community and social bonds, economic change, population change, disease, political structures, ecclesiastical structures and political upheaval, students will gain a foundational understanding of the process of conquest, the expansion of art and of a written culture, the impact of the warfare; also the relationships between lords and labourers; development of trade and urbanization, the spread of written culture, the development of the common law and parliament, and the relationships between Britain, Ireland, Wales and the continent.

Prerequisite(s):3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 213.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 223.3 — 1/2(3L)
Age of the Renaissance

This course introduces the student to world of Western Europe in the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. It covers the major developments in the period: the Renaissance and Reformation, the development of centralized monarchies, and the start of the Scientific Revolution. In addition, it examines topics such as magic and witchcraft and their relationship to these larger events or movements.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 225 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 224.3 — 1/2(3L)
Early Modern Europe 1555 to 1660

Europe from the Peace of Augsburg to the Restoration. Evolution and instability of political systems, socioeconomic structures, and religious and intellectual assumptions. The shaping of modern structures and institutions.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 226.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 230.3 — 1/2(3L)
Christianity from Constantine to the Age of the Renaissance and the Reformations 300 to 1650 CE

This course is designed to introduce students to the changing role of the Christian Churches in those centuries when Christianity became a world religion and the dominant cultural institution throughout Europe. While the course focuses mainly on Mediterranean and European society, the spread of Christianity in these times included most of the known world and began to include the “New World.”

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level HIST or 30 credit units at university level
Note: Pre-1815. Students who have completed HIST 285.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 231.3 — 1/2(3L)
Christianity in Modern Times 1650 to 2000

This course is designed to study the changing role of the Christian Churches in European society from 1700 to the present. It focuses on key turning points in the history of Christianity including the rise of Pietism and Methodism, the Enlightenment, the French and Industrial Revolutions, the Great Awakenings in America, Christian missions, and the movements and crises of the twentieth century. By studying the ways Christianity has adapted to social, economic and intellectual change in the past three hundred years, the course will provide a basis for a clearer appraisal of the role and problems of the churches in society today.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level HIST or 30 credit units at university level.
Note: Students who have completed HIST 285.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 232.3 — 1/2(3L)
Europe's Long Eighteenth Century 1660-1789

From European state-building to empire-building. Intellectual shifts, including the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment. Socio-economic changes, such as urbanization, agriculture and global trade. The growing demands for political equality and the start of the French Revolution.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 226.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 234.3 — 1/2(3L)
Europe from 1870 to 1939 War Politics and Culture in Modern Mass Society

This course surveys major developments in European history between 1870 and the outbreak of the Second World War. Topics covered include the geopolitical, intellectual, cultural, and other legacies of the late nineteenth century; the origins and outcomes of the First World War; the Russian Revolution and the rise of communism; artistic and cultural movements of the interwar years; the emergence and spread of fascism; the Great Depression; Nazi Germany; the Spanish Civil War; and the diplomatic crises of the late 1930s.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note: Post-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 229.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 235.3 — 1/2(3L)
Europe since 1939 From the Second World War to the Creation of the European Union and Beyond

This course surveys major developments in European history since 1939. Topics covered include the Second World War and the Holocaust; postwar reconstruction; the Cold War; Europe and the colonial world; stages in the formation of the European Union; the social movements of the 1960s (the student and women’s movements, environmentalism; the sexual revolution); the economic challenges of the 1970s and 80s; the fall of communism in Eastern Europe; and the issues and challenges facing contemporary European society.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note:Post-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 229.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 236.3 — 1/2(3L)
Italy in Age of Baroque 1550 to 1789

A survey of Italian history in the early modern period, with emphasis on the states system and the foreign presence, economic developments, social foundations, religious reform, and the transition from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 240.3 — 1/2(3L)
More than Conquerors The British Peoples and Their World 1450 to 1720

This course is intended as an introduction to the history of Britain and Ireland, the British Empire and the early modern period. Between the mid-fifteenth and late sixteenth centuries, the British kingdoms experienced transformations in culture, faith and politics that turned them into a more centralized and imperial polity; these reformations of state and church also generated economic and political upheaval and religious division. The regime inherited in the early seventeenth century by the first Stuart kings of Britain and Ireland subsequently collapsed in the mid-century troubles, and was replaced by a more “confessional” state after the restoration of the monarchy. This state, itself reformed by a revolution in 1688, subsequently oversaw Britain’s remarkable global territorial gains during the following two centuries. The course will attend largely to the major political, religious and economic transformations which were the hallmarks of Britain’s experience of early modernity and the first British Empire.

Formerly: Half of HIST 246.6
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level or INTS 101 or 30 credit units of university course credit
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 242 or HIST 246 will not receive credit for this course.


HIST 241.3 — 1/2(3L)
Anglobalization Britain and its Empires 1700 to 2000

The story of how Britain gained the world’s biggest ever empire over the course of two and half centuries (Anglobalization) and then lost almost all of it over two generations is a remarkable episode in human history, raising a host of complex and vital questions. What political, religious, military, economic, cultural, and intellectual developments propelled Great Britain's unlikely rise to global supremacy? What caused the fall of the first British Empire, the astonishing rise of its second Imperium, and the rapid break-up of that empire after 1945? And what effect did it all have on “ordinary” people in Britain and its Empire across three centuries? The story of Anglobalization is also important today because Canada uses an “operating system” provided by Britain. To understand how Canada runs politically and even culturally involves grasping the origin of its British-designed operating system.

Formerly: Half of HIST 246.6
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level or INTS 101 or 30 credit units of university course credit
Note: Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 243 or HIST 246 will not receive credit for this course.


HIST 251.3 — 1/2(3L)
History of the Civil War in the United States

Examines the developments that led to the Civil War, the important campaigns and battles, the social, economic, and political developments on the home fronts and the reasons why the Confederacy lost and the Union won, and how the war affected American politics and society for generations afterward.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 253.3 — 1/2(3L)
Bringing Up the Bodies in History

This course offers a smorgasbord of rich readings in (predominantly) Canadian body history. This area of study crosses many specialties within Canadian history, including but not limited to studies of women, gender, labour, the environment, sports, colonization and immigration. What unites this body of readings is that they begin with the premise that the body is a site of historical investigation and that bodies have histories. That is, as Mary Kosut and Lisa Jean Moore (Moore, Lisa Jean and Kosut, Mary. The Body Reader: Essential Social and Cultural Readings. (New York and London: New York University Press, 2010.): 1) assert, “the body is the medium or raw material through which we navigate the world, but is also an entity that is invested with meanings.” This course explores the historical meanings of the body/ies, its/their representations, and experiences as it/they reflect and help constitute the ordering of gender, sexual, class, racial relations in Canada at particular points in history.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level; or INTS 101; or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 255.3 — 1/2(3L)
Canadian History from the Pre Contact Period to 1867

This course is an introduction to the history of Canada up until Confederation in 1867. The bi-weekly lectures will examine major events, issues, and themes in pre-Confederation history, with a specific focus on key historical debates and our understandings of Canada's colonial past. A few of the topics for this course include native-newcomer relations, European empires and conquest, colonial cultures, and rebellion and nationhood.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University
Note: Pre-1815; North America. Students who have received credit for HIST 151.3 may not take HIST 255.3 for credit.


HIST 256.3 — 1/2(3L)
Post Confederation Canada 1867 to the Present

This course is an introductory Canadian history lecture course that covers Canadian history from 1867, the year of Confederation, to the present day. It combines political, social, cultural and gender history approaches to the study of Canada' past. This course surveys the development of the Canadian nation-state and its people. Topics include: First Nations people; federal politics; society and gender; war; activism; regional politics and economy and Canadian culture.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University courses
Note: Post-1815; North America. Students with credit in HIST 152.3 may not take this class for credit.


HIST 257.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Canadian Prairie to 1905

A study of Rupert's Land and the North-West to the early 20th century, including early contact between European and Aboriginal societies, the development, expansion, and decline of the fur trade, early western communities, environmental changes, Canadian expansionism and national development policies, regional responses, and developments leading to provincehood.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: North America. Students with credit for HIST 209 may not take this course for credit. HIST 209 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.


HIST 258.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Canadian Prairies since 1905

An examination of the three prairie provinces, including the impact of the two World Wars and the Depression, protest movements and parties, urban growth and the modernization of rural life, environmental disasters and new resource developments, Aboriginal renewal, and western alienation.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Post-1815; North America. Students with credit for HIST 209 may not take this course for credit. HIST 209 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.


HIST 259.3 — 1/2(3L)
Canadian Women from Pre Contact Period to 1918

Examines the history of Canadian women from the pre-contact period until the end of World War I, emphasizing the complexities of women's experiences and the interplay of such factors as gender, class, race and ethnicity. Employs chronological and thematic approaches while also making reference to historical debates and historiographical developments.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: North America.


HIST 260.3 — 1/2(3L)
Canadian Women History from 1919 to Present

Examines the history of Canadian women from the end of World War I to the present, emphasizing the complexities of women's experiences and the interplay of such factors as gender, class, race and ethnicity. Employs chronological and thematic approaches while also making reference to historical debates and historiographical developments.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 263.6 — 1&2(3L)
The Canadian North

A survey of the history of northern Canada (north of 60): the northern environment and aboriginal peoples; the search for the North-West passage; whaling and the fur trade; Klondike Gold Rush and northern sovereignty; police, missionaries and the Hudson's Bay Company; Diefenbaker's northern vision and the Cold War; northern pipelines, territorial self-government and native land claims.

Formerly: HIST 222. HIST 222 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: North America.


HIST 264.3 — 1/2(3L)
Native Newcomer Relations in Canada to 1880

A survey of relations between indigenous peoples and immigrants to Canada from the 15th century to 1880, emphasizing early fur trade, religious, military, and civil interactions.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: North America. Students with credit for HIST 223 may not take this course for credit. HIST 223 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.


HIST 265.3 — 1/2(3L)
Native Newcomer Relations in Canada 1880 to Present

A survey of relations between Natives and newcomers to Canada from the creation of the modern Department of Indian Affairs to the present, emphasizing assimilative policies, political resistance and organization, land disputes, and Aboriginal involvement in constitutional discussions.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Post-1815; North America. Students with credit for HIST 223 may not take this course for credit. HIST 223 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.


HIST 266.3 — 1/2(3L)
History Wars Issues in Native Newcomer Relations

The relationships between indigenous people and newcomers remain contentious and misunderstood -- they are the fodder of history wars. This course explores the historical antecedents of these tensions in both Canada and the USA. Aboriginal identity, Native rights, spirituality, residential school abuse cases, fisheries, self-government, casinos, research ethics, oral history.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: North America.


HIST 267.3
African History From Hominids to 1900

Africa is often portrayed as the “dark continent”, a place of poverty, disease and war. Yet, this is far from the historical reality. This course will show that Africa and Africans had an important role to play in global history. We begin with the journey of the first hominids out of Africa and then look at the centralization of power and building of powerful Iron Age trading kingdoms. The course also looks at the social, cultural and religious beliefs of African people and later investigate the development of new pluralistic societies which integrated newcomers and local people into global trading networks. We then consider one of the central debates of Southern African history, the Mfecane: the period in which Shaka waged wars across the Southern African interior and the “empty land myth”. We end by looking at the slave trade both internally and the trading of slaves out of Africa.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 245.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 268.3
African History 1900 until Yesterday

Africa is often portrayed as the “dark continent”, yet this is far from the historical reality. This course will show that Africa and Africans played a central role in global history. This course begins with a consideration of the process of colonization, how colonists carved up Africa with very little consideration for the people or geography. This process fundamentally shaped the political, social and economic developments during this era. We will then look at the major migration from the rural to the urban areas in the mid-20th Century and how this shaped the capitalist economy. The finally the course looks at the liberation and post-liberation period, considering the experiences of soldiers, exiles and refugees. In the final weeks, we will look at the creation of the African Diaspora and the processes of ‘development’ which have seen a renewed interest in Africa. We will ask to what extent this new interest might be considered neo-colonialism.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 245.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 274.3 — 1/2(3L)
A History of the United States to 1865

This lecture course examines many of the significant social, economic, environmental, political, diplomatic and military developments in American history, from the pre-colonial period to 1865. It focusses on several important historical topics including: Native American cultures; the European background of American settlement; the establishment of colonies and development of an American nationality; the American Revolution; the formation of the Union; and the struggle to maintain it leading up to the Civil War.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note: North America. Students with credit for HIST 270.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 275.3 — 1/2(3L)
History of the United States after 1865

This lecture course examines many of the significant social, economic, environmental, political, diplomatic and military developments in American history, from 1865 to the present. It focusses on several important historical topics including: Reconstruction; westward expansion; industrialization and urbanization; imperialism and the rise to global power; World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II; the Civil Rights Movement and the counterculture; the Cold War and its aftermath.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note: Post-1815; North America. Students with credit for HIST 270.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 276.3 — 1/2(3L)
Colonial and Latin America Conquest Resistance Accommodation

This class explores the history of Colonial Latin America, from 1492 to independence in the early 19th century. Themes examined include the apparent contradictions of the combination of incredible violence and a long legalistic peace, of colonialism and continued indigenous culture and authority; of separate republics and intense co-mingling of cultures and peoples, of economic stagnation and intense economic activity, of forced labour and emergent capitalism, death and resurrection, resistance and accommodation.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-Level HIST or permission of instructor.
Note:Pre-1815; Other Regions.


HIST 277.3 — 1/2(3L)
Resistance and Dispossession Latin America in the 19th Century

This course explores the history of Latin America from independence in the early 19th century to the end of WWI. It examines various sources of conflict: conflict between states as the borders of Latin American countries were defined; conflict over the nature of citizenship and rights as many countries ended slavery but sought to deny full rights to blacks and most sought to acculturate or eliminate indigenous cultures; and conflict over access to land and labour. The tumultuous 19th century set the stage for on-going struggle in contemporary Latin America.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-Level HIST or permission of the department.
Note: Post-1815; Other Regions. Students with credit for HIST 271.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 278.3 — 1/2(3L)
20th Century Latin America From Revolution to Repression Neo Liberalism to Indigenous Resurgence

This course explores the history of Latin America from the 1920s to today. It mixes economic, social, political, intellectual and environmental approaches. Important themes that will be explored include the rise of radical political ideas in the 1920s, revolutionary movements in the 1950s to the 1970s, the spread of a repressive national-security state abetted by US military assistance in the 1960s and 1970s, the dominance of neo-liberal economic models in the wake of the debt crisis in the 1980s, the emergence of vibrant indigenous and popular struggles in opposition in the 1980s and 1990s and the nature of the Latin American social democratic alternatives, as diverse as Brazil under the Workers’ Party and the Bolivia under Evo Morales. The course will also explore the influence of the drug trade on Latin American society and politics, and contemporary environmental and social conflicts over mining and other resource extraction.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-Level HIST or permission of the department.
Note: Post-1815; Other Regions. Students with credit for HIST 271.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 281.6 — 1&2(3L)
Military History

The evolution of modes of warfare from the Renaissance to the present. Military and naval strategy and tactics, civilian-military relations, weaponry, and military organization are included. Military history is interwoven with general history and particular attention is paid to the social and political aspects of militarism.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 282.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
Behind the News

This course will explore the history and historical debates behind contemporary events ‘in the news’. Each course analyzes a specific set of linked contemporary events and provides students with lectures and reading to help them make sense of these events from a historical perspective. Through such an exploration each course offering encourages students to understand the various ways contemporary events can and should be understood.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level or permission of the department
Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 283.3 — 1/2(3L)
Society and Rise of Science from the Renaissance to Industrial Revolution

A study of the development of science in the context of social, political and intellectual change between the Renaissance and the end of the l8th century. Special attention will be paid to the Copernican Revolution, renaissance technology, the tension between science and religion, and the early Industrial Revolution.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or 3 credit units of any natural science, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 284.3 — 1/2(3L)
Society and Rise of Science from the Industrial Revolution to 20th Century

A study of the development of science and its interaction with social, political and intellectual change from the Industrial Revolution to the present. The relationship between science and technology in the Industrial Revolution, the transition from alchemy to chemistry, the Darwinian achievement, and the impact of science on the modern world.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or 3 credit units of any natural science, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 286.3 — 1/2(3L)
Modern China from the Qing Dynasty to the Present

We consider how the different expansions and decline of the Qing Empire affected the movement of people, as well as the Qing’s dramatic clash with European Imperialism. We explore the socio-political structures and conception of imperial power during the Qing and patterns of semi-colonialism. Simultaneously we pay attention to the formation of influential social movements in China such as nationalist, Marxist and feminist movements. Students familiarize themselves with Chinese intellectuals at the turn of the century and during the New Culture Movement, and in particular with the woman problem. We examine Maoist China, both in its particularities but also embedded in a global context, by considering the global relationship between revolution and modernization in China. We take into account global forces such as Japanese, European Imperialism, Soviet Socialism that have shaped Chinese history, but also the meaning of culture during the Cultural Revolution and post-Mao politics and social life.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of HIST at 100 level or INTS 101 or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Other Regions


HIST 290.3 — 1/2(3L)
Topics in Environmental History

Explores various topics in environmental history. The focus of the course in any academic term will vary. Students may take more than one section of HIST 290 for credit, provided the subject matter of each course taken differs substantially. Topics covered might be as broad as an environmental history of the world or as specific as nuclear testing and environmental destruction. Students are encouraged to check with the department for more information.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 291.6 — 1&2(3L)
The World Wars

An in-depth examination of World Wars I and II. Topics will include the underlying causes of both wars, the combat history of both wars, the role both wars played in transforming the world's societies and economic systems, and the fundamental realignment in global power brought about by the world wars.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Post-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 292.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Menace of Progress I Enlightenment Colonialism Dispossession

This course explores the process of, reasons for, and arguments about European colonialism from the 16th to the mid-20th centuries. It links European colonialism to changes in Europe itself, most especially ideas of progress linked to the Enlightenment and capitalist relations of production. The dispossession of marginalized populations in Europe, and the rationales used for such dispossession, are compared to rationales for colonialism and colonial dispossession. The violence of colonial dispossession in various locales in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and heightened racism are explored as is the trend towards a focus on colonial 'development' in the 20th century.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 289.6 may not take this course for credit; Other Regions.


HIST 293.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Menace of Progress II The Promise and Failure of Development

This course examines the promise and ultimate failure of development. Stemming from the dismantling of colonial empires and the creation of an infrastructure to manage the international economy near the end of second World War, 'development' promised to end or dramatically reduce poverty around the world. Development policies ultimately failed to meet those goals and were replaced by neo- liberalism and arguments about good governance by the end of the 20th century. This course explores the idea of development and suggests the difficulties encountered in living up to its promises lie in its basic premises; reliant as they are on the continued desire to impose specific types of economic and social relations around the world---the continuation of what might be called the Menace of Progress. The course explores this history through an examination of post-independent economic policy in Africa, Asia and Latin America and an exploration of the history behind various ideas important to the concept of development: poverty, population and the expanded role of the market.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 289.6 may not take this course for credit; Other Regions.


HIST 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. See department for current details.


HIST 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. See department for current details.


HIST 302.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Life and Letters Roman Society and Culture through Epistolary Practice

Ancient letters and letter writers, for example, Cicero and/or Pliny the Younger, are starting points for study of the political, social, and cultural history of ancient Rome and its empire. Classes will be based on lecture and discussion of selected letters, and assigned books and articles.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level HIST or CLAS.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 303.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Sex Gender and Sexuality in Africa

Recent scholarship on sex, gender and sexuality in Africa has focused on the relationship between a constructed African sexual deviance and the rising rates of HIV/AIDS on the continent. This course seeks to understand how the stereotypes of African sexuality, same-sex relationships and gender oppression were formed. Through a wide range of scholarly literature, primary sources, biographies and visual texts we will then move beyond this narrow focus and use historical studies to destabilize dominant assumptions about gender and sexuality in Africa. To do this we will use predominantly African texts and develop analytical tools appropriate to African contexts. In this way the course will provide rich accounts of African lives and how they shape and are shaped by issues of gender and sexuality.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Post-1815; Other Regions


HIST 307.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Seminar in Ancient Medieval and Renaissance Biography

History viewed through documents related to a single individual. Students will work from various perspectives, including social, institutional, cultural, intellectual, and gender history. Possible individuals to be studied include Peter Abelard, Elizabeth I, Erasmus, and Joan of Arc.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 308.6 — SU(4L-9S)
Rome Building and Living in the Ancient City

This 3-week intensive, lecture-seminar summer study abroad class takes place in Italy every two years and focuses on the study of the ancient city of Rome (8 century BCE to 4 century CE). Urban planning and development, architectural history, monuments and authority, aspects of life in the largest ancient metropolis, Christianity in urban space, are some of the subjects that we cover; first in the classroom, and then during site visits in the city of Rome. This course will benefit especially students who have taken classics, archaeology, CMRS, history or art and art history at the 100 and 200 levels, and who would like the opportunity to expand their knowledge of Rome, its urban culture and architectural history.

Formerly: HIST 204
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST, CLAS, ARCH or ARTH, or 45 credit units at University and permission of the Instructor.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students who have received credit for HIST 204 will not receive credit for this course.


HIST 309.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Crusades and Aftermath

Examines the socio-economic pressures and spiritual goals basic to the Crusades, military encounters, the organization of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem (1099-1291), and ensuing contacts between Christians and Muslims to the eighteenth century.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 310.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Beavers Booze and Bully Boys Fur Trade Wars in North America

This course is an introduction to the history of the fur trade in North America prior to the merger of the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company in 1821. The lectures, readings and discussions will examine the major events, issues, and themes surrounding the fur trade. Fur trade history intersects with numerous other histories, allowing for a wide assortment of topics including native-newcomer relations, commodities and historical economic conditions, the evolution of gender relations, imperial/colonial societies and conquest, labour, transportation, and changing concepts of modernity.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level
Note: North America; Pre-1815


HIST 313.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Vengeance and Violence in Medieval Europe

Examines vengeance, violence and the development of legal systems in medieval European society. Emphasis will be placed on: relations between "social" or "private" vengeance and more "organized" forms of violence (punishment, warfare); responses to violent crime; effects of gender, class, ethnicity and religion on the issue of violence.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 330.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Humanist Thought in Renaissance Italy 1300 to 1527

A reading course in the development of renaissance Humanism from Petrarch to Machiavelli. Topics will include the cult of the classics, the Greek revival, new trends in education, civic humanism, and renaissance philosophy, history and political thought.

Formerly: HIST 315. HIST 315 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 331.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Magic Science and Religion before the Scientific Revolution

Medieval magic was founded upon conventional scientific and religious presuppositions. It was also unconventional and illicit. Examines magical literature and traditions from third- to sixteenth-century Europe, the place of magic in early European history, and reflects on the theoretical issues surrounding the classification of magic.

Formerly HIST 382. HIST 382 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 333.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Defining Boundaries Natural and Supernatural Worlds in Early Modern Europe

Considers the shifting meanings of the natural and supernatural worlds in early modern Europe (ca. 1500-1800), a period that encompassed the Reformation, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. It explores the boundaries between human and animal, body and soul, life and death, science and religion, and reality and imagination.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 334.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
History of Medicine Bugs to Drugs 1800 to the Present

This course examines the changing content, practice and organisation of medicine since 1800. We will explore the social and cultural history of medicine alongside some of the technological, scientific and professional developments in the field.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level
Note: Students with credit for HIST 398: History of Medicine, 1800-Present may not take HIST 334 for credit. Post-1815.


HIST 335.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Spectacles of Death in the Roman World

Ridley Scott’s film Gladiator (2000) brought the bloodlust of the Roman arena to a 21st century audience. The film appears to confirm that the Romans, especially emperors and the plebeian masses, were a cruel and bloodthirsty lot. Trained killers- gladiators- slaughtered innocent victims, or savage lions mauled and devoured them, all for the pleasure of the Roman people. This course takes a critical look at the varied deadly activities (munera, venationes, damnatio ad bestias), held in the Roman arena by examining ancient textual and visual sources, and modern scholarship. We will examine these spectacles in the broader context of Roman performance culture, religion and politics. Were these spectacles merely the product of a debased and declining culture? How has modern scholarship understood the apparent madness of the Roman arena?

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level HIST or CLAS
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain


HIST 350.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
The War That Shaped a Continent The Seven Years War and the Conquest of Canada

The British conquest of 1759-1763 assessed primarily in terms of its effect upon French Canadian society. Historical interpretations of this central event in Canadian history will form the core of study.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; North America.


HIST 352.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
History of the American West

The course will explore the multiple meanings of the American West through readings, discussion, presentations and film. We will examine the development of Indigenous cultures, European exploration, conquest and colonization, the fur trade, the development of agriculture, gold rushes, outlaws and violence and the role of government and politics in the environment of the Trans-Mississippi West. We will also investigate the role that race and ethnicity as well as gender and sexuality had in making the West what it is. Finally, we will investigate how these categories in particular have affected the way that the West has developed in the 20th and 21st centuries leading up to how historians and the public view the West through the lens of popular culture.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level HIST.
Note: North America


HIST 353.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Pests Plagues Pox and Politics A History of Health Care in Canada

This course explores the history of health care in Canada from the pre-contact period to the establishment of universal health insurance (Medicare). The focus of this course is on the politics of health care (who provides what care, to whom, and under what circumstances). This course will examine the provision of health care as it emerged from local forms of knowledge within various communities to professional knowledge delivered in private and public institutions. In addition, the course will examine the relationships among and between government, non-governmental and/or professional responses to infectious or acute diseases and their impact on various populations in Canada.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 362.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Doing Canadian History

An examination of how Canadian history has been presented and interpreted outside the usual academic precincts. Examples include popular history, historic sites and parks, film/video, museums, political rhetoric, and architecture.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: North America.


HIST 363.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Canada in Age of Affluence Post 1945

Canadians emerged from World War II confident, optimistic and well-positioned to play a leading role in world events. What happened? Seminar topics devoted to political, social, cultural and economic developments allow students to study the central dichotomy of modern Canadian life-angst in an era of affluence.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 364.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Imagining American and Canadian Wests

Violence on the American frontier(s) did as much or more to create a distinctive American character as the peaceful settling of the Canadian west did to mold national identity in this country, or did it? This course explores the myths that continue to shape public consciousness as they distort history.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 365.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Recipes for a Nation Food History in Canada

This course offers students the opportunity to engage with a newly emerging field of historical scholarship: food history. Food, its production, marketing, preparation and consumption is the product of particular societies and cultural practices and, ultimately, food has a history. Drawing upon the recent international and national literature this class offers a social and cultural history of Canada through food. Employing the traditional analytical categories of social history (race, gender, class and nation/region) provides us with the tools to understand the expansion of food products and commercialization; the growth of fast food empires; immigration and "ethnic" cuisine, the gendered dynamics of the kitchen, the farmyard and the grocery store; food safety and social justice; and now, most recently, our fascination with sustainability, organic foods and so-called '100 mile diets.'

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level HIST
Note: North America. Students who took the earlier iteration of this class as a HIST 398.3 (2011 and 2012) may not take this course for credit.


HIST 370.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Violence Smuggling and Vice Borderlands and the Gaps of Power

This course introduces students to the history of borderlands by analyzing what borderlands are, how they form, why they matter, and how they change our conceptions of history. We will study the historic formation of the borderlands of North America paying close attention to the efforts that Canada, Britain, the United States, and Mexico expended to demarcate their national boundaries and the slippages that occurred when nations have tried to force binary categories, such as nationalities, onto historically mobile and interconnected populations. In doing so, we will study inter-tribal borderlands, borderlands between Natives and newcomers, and the creation of borders between European powers. We will assess the impact and contributions that communities such as the Cree, Sioux, Nez Perce, Métis, Comanche, Iroquois and Coast Salish made to the demarcation, enforcement, and placement of European boundaries. Finally, we will compare the borderlands of North America to borderlands across the world, utilizing case studies from Europe, Thailand, Indonesia, India, Bangladesh, and Morocco. Throughout this process, we will focus on contentious issues such as violence, warfare, smuggling, prostitution, nation building, abductions, and racial exclusion.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.


HIST 375.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
USA Foreign Relations 1890s to the Present

In the post 9/11 period, interest in the study of American foreign relations has continued to increase. This hybrid lecture/seminar course examines the history and historiography of U.S. foreign relations from the 1890s to the present. While the emphasis is on diplomatic history, the course also considers the political, economic, cultural, and social implications of American foreign policies in the United States and the wider world.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 379.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Slavery in the Americas

Examines the history of slavery in the Americas, comparing the experience in the United States, Brazil, and the Caribbean. Various themes will be examined; the reasons for slavery, the economics of the slave trade, the development of slave society, slave resistance and revolt, opposition to slavery, the abolition of slavery, and the aftermath of slavery.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 383.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Scientific Revolution from Newton to Darwin

The scientific and philosophical discovery of the laws of nature from the period of Newton to Darwin. Emphasis will be given to the status of science, the growth of experiment, the relationship between science and technology, and the decline of the mystical view of nature in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 384.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

The course investigates women's lives in Europe from ca. 1500 to ca. 1800, and includes topics such as female life-cycle and sexuality, women's economic and political roles, literary and artistic creations, piety and witchcraft, the development of notions of masculinity and femininity, and the relationship between gender and power.

Prerequisite: 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 385.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Selected Topics in Central American History

Examines selected themes in the history of Central America, concentrating on the 19th and 20th centuries.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Post-1815; Other Regions. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 387.3 — 1/2(3L)
Eugenics birth control and venereal disease in Republican China and the global context

This course traces the merging of eugenics with birth control in Republican China and globally, such as in the arguments of birth control activist Margaret Sanger, and the intersection between eugenics, hygiene and nation building. Examining the reaction of Chinese intellectuals to such scientific racial ideas, will enrich our understanding of the utopic potency of eugenics as a solution to social ills such as poverty and disease. Reproduction is brought in connection with ideologies of racial improvement such as eugenics, which also underpinned the One Child Policy in the 1980s. Chinese and international activists, writers and ideologues linked the population question, theories of degeneration and race suicide, birth control, and venereal disease to eugenics. Eugenics is intertwined with mental and physical health. Eugenics functions as an international ideology that also reinforces nationalism. The scientific argument has an explanatory value and legitimates the implementation of birth control and sterilization.

HIST 388.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Mass Killing and Genocide in the Twentieth Century

An examination of major mass killings in the twentieth century. The course analyzes the definitions and theories of mass killings, including genocide and ethnic cleansing. It also discusses how the international community can best detect and prevent a mass killing using such tools as international law and humanitarian intervention.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Post-1815; Other Regions.


HIST 391.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Healing and Illness in Early Modern Europe

Considers illness and peoples' responses to illness in Europe (ca 1500-1800). It examines what people suffered from, how diseases and the human body were understood, and what medical treatments were available in Early Modern society.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 392.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
History of Sexuality in North America

How did this "private matter" become a subject of historical inquiry? How does the history of sexuality challenge our historical assumptions? Focusing primarily on nineteenth and twentieth century North America this class will explore the sexual regulation, repression and resistance at work within politics, the law, the medical profession, and society.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 395.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
New Directions in Historical Research

Explore exciting research taught by faculty or a senior PhD candidate overseen by a faculty mentor. In lectures and seminars, students engage with ground-breaking topics and sources, and the process by which historians develop research and teaching strategies.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. See department for current details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 396.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Digital History

Digital history, the application of new and emerging technologies to the study of history, is an exciting new historical methodology. In this course, we explore the literature on digital history, and then put theory into practice by digitally collecting, evaluating, and producing historical knowledge. Along with discussing what is digital history and how it is evolving, this course will introduce students to text mining, geographic information systems (GIS) and developing historical websites. How digital archives are changing how we preserve and research history. Students will get hands-on experience with a wide range of digital skills and use these new methods to develop a final digital history project.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level HIST courses


HIST 397.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Approaches to History

How should (and how do) historians approach their scholarship, and how has this changed in recent generations? This course engages a range of methodological, philosophical, and historiographical readings drawn from a comprehensive survey of topical, thematic, and theoretical fields, collectively aimed at encouraging students to think about the process and methods of doing history.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 398 Special Topics Approaches to History may not take this course for credit. HIST 397 is required for the Honours and Double Honours programs.


HIST 398.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. See department for current details.


HIST 399.6 — 1&2(1.5L-1.5S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. See department for current details.


HIST 402.3 — 1/2(3S)
Aspects of Late Antiquity

A study of the cultural and intellectual history of Late Antiquity based on the reading of primary sources in translation. Topics include church-state relations, the survival of the classical heritage, education, the early papacy, influential women, early monasticism and the fathers of the church.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 403.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in the History of Early Medieval England The Anglo Saxon Renaissance

Designed to introduce honours history students (not necessarily specialists in the area) to the primary sources and historiography of the Anglo-Saxon Renaissance. Given the scarcity of contemporary documentary evidence for large portions of this period, it is important for students to become familiar with non-documentary primary sources. Such sources include those revealed by archaeology, numismatics, and art history. Scholars must learn to use these sources in their efforts to understand the existing documentary sources and place them in a wider historical context.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 410.3 — 1/2(3S)
France in the Americas 1500 to 1803 In Search of Empire

This course examines the history of French colonialism in the Americas from the first explorers and settlements to the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. Weekly readings and seminar discussions explore a variety of historical themes designed to critically evaluate the French colonial experience and analyze the character of the French Empire in the Americas. Such themes include native-newcomer relations, empire and conquest, religion, slavery, women and gender, métissage, commerce, and the French in North America after the fall of New France. The French had a profound influence on the Americas, from the Maritimes to the Canadian Northwest, and as far south as New Orleans and the Caribbean. This class puts the Spanish, American, and British North American (Canadian) Empires into context, and sets a foundation for understanding the English/French divide in contemporary Canada and the rise of the Métis in Western Canada.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior level HIST of which 3 credit units must be at the 300-level; or permission of the department
Note: North America; Pre-1815


HIST 414.3 — 1/2(3S)
Masculinity in Middle Ages and Renaissance

Will examine the many recent historical studies on gender and masculinity including topics such as medical theory, class and work, sexuality, and crime. Students will be asked to employ historical sources to evaluate the value of this trend in scholarship as well as the associated theoretical perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 421.3 — 1/2(3S)
Erasmus and Renaissance Humanism

Erasmus of Rotterdam was the world's first best-selling author who lived amidst the transformations and upheaval of early modern Europe. Student seminar presentations will include: the origins of northern humanism; Erasmus and Thomas More; Erasmus and the classical heritage; Erasmus as satirist; education; biblical and patristic studies; spirituality; controversies with Catholic and Protestant critics; peace and toleration.

Permission of the department required.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 424.3 — 1/2(3S)
Catholic Reform and Counter Reformation in Italy 1540 to 1650

A seminar on Catholic Reform in Italy focusing on early projects for reform, the development of the Papacy, new religious orders, the Council of Trent and its implementation, the Roman Inquisition, and the Index of prohibited books.

Formerly: HIST 466. HIST 466 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 434.3 — 1/2(3S)
Fascism Gender and Sexuality

Explores how assumptions about gender and sexuality shaped fascist movements in Germany, Italy, and France. How did fascists define masculinity and femininity? How did those definitions shape fascist ideals and policies? How did sexuality and race intersect with the delineation of gender roles for men and women?

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Post-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 444.3 — 1/2(3S)
Everyday Life and Popular Culture in Early Modern Britain

This course explores the key constitutive elements of local communities in Britain from 1500 to 1800 using the tools of social and cultural historians. We will focus on the structures encountered by ordinary British women and men, including their interactions with hierarchy, patriarchy, managing and provisioning households, the practices of governance, making and exchanging goods and services, the cycles of birth, marriage and death, worshipping and remembering. The aim of the course is to give students an appreciation of the material culture of early modern Britain.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level, or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students who have taken HIST 498.3 Special Topics: Social and Cultural History of Early Modern Britain may not take this course for credit.


HIST 445.3 — 1/2(3S)
British Cities Empire and Global Environmental Change

During the long nineteenth century, Britain emerged as a leading urban and industrial nation. Rapid urban development transformed local environments and the population suffered from the unhealthy living conditions brought by overcrowding and pollution. The cities, nonetheless, were phenomenal engines of wealth creation and helped increase Britain’s global influence. Continued industrial growth in Britain relied on overseas forests, farms, grasslands, plantations and mines to supply a growing assortment of raw materials, such as cotton, sugar, tallow, palm oil, guano, timber, wheat, tea, indigo and rubber. The vast expansion of Britain’s economic influence also coincided with the expansion of its empire. This set off a new era of ecological imperialism, as the British botanists, industrialists and officials helped reorder nature, both in the empire and in economically dependent regions. This course will explore the interconnected histories of urban industrial development, imperialism and environmental change at the local, regional and global scale.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 300-level.
Note: Post-1815; Europe & Great Britain.


HIST 462.3 — 1/2(3S)
Orality Literacy Memory Tradition and History

People understand the past differently. Historical information is constituted and conveyed in culturally specific ways. This course examines the way that orality, literacy, memory and notions of “tradition” intersect in the construction and conveyance of historical knowledge between cultures and within particular cultures over time.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level.
Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. Students with credit for HIST 498 (Orality, Literacy, Memory, and History) may not take this course for credit.


HIST 466.3 — 1/2(3S)
Canada Great War

Examines how Canada responded to outbreak of war in 1914 and how its participation in the bloody conflict over the next four years fundamentally changed the country both on the home front and in its place on the world stage. One federal cabinet minister claimed that the war had so much to answer for: this seminar will enable students to understand and appreciate Canada's first total war and how the country that enthusiastically joined the conflict in 1914 was not the same country in 1918.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 471.6 — 1&2(3S)
United States in the Nuclear Age

Examines the development of U.S. Cold War policies, with special attention paid to the decisions regarding nuclear weapons. While emphasis is on political and diplomatic history, the course also studies the social, cultural and environmental implications of these policies in the United States and beyond.

Formerly: HIST 431. HIST 431 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Post-1815; North America.


HIST 472.3 — 1/2(3S)
The United States and the Middle East

This seminar course examines American foreign policies in the Middle East during and after the Cold War. More specifically, it focusses on U.S. relations with nations such as Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Israel, the Palestinian National Authority, Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan. While the emphasis is on the political, diplomatic, strategic and economic aspects of these relations, the course also studies the cultural dimensions of U.S. policies.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.


HIST 478.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
United States and the Vietnam Wars

Examines key political, military, social, and cultural themes related to the American experience in Vietnam from World War Two to the fall of Saigon.

Formerly: HIST 378
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Post-1815; North America. Students with credit for HIST 398 The United States and the Vietnam Wars or HIST 378 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 481.3 — 1/2(3S)
A History of Pain in Early Modern Europe

Recent scholarship has questioned the relationship between cultural perceptions and bodily experience. Using an interdisciplinary framework, this course explores the meanings and experience of pain in Europe (1600-1800), particularly the growing division between mind and body. We will read sufferers' narratives alongside literature, philosophy, and surgico-medical treatises.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 482.3 — 1/2(3S)
History of Native Newcomer Relations in the United States

Will examine the history of Aboriginal peoples within the United States and will concentrate on the formation of indigenous cultures and how they reacted and adapted to Euro-American conquest, colonization, and dispossession to become one of the fastest growing "minority" populations in the United States.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: North America.


HIST 484.3 — 1/2(3S)
History of Madness From Enlightenment to Prozac

This seminar examines historical issues in mental health and psychiatry from medical, sociological, cultural, legal and political perspectives, principally in the English-speaking world. Charting a path from the rise of the asylum, to the dark chapter of the lobotomy, through Big Pharma and into Scientology, the History of Madness considers how we have historically found reason through insanity.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Post-1815


HIST 487.3 — 1/2(3S)
Conflict and Compromise A History of South Africa

South African history is one of conflict and compromise; change and continuity. While the course will focus on the Twentieth Century, we begin with the origins of humankind in the ‘Cradle of Civilization’, through the colonial, apartheid and post-apartheid era. Throughout the course we will focus on the way the past shapes the present. Much of South Africa’s history was shaped by its specific form of industrialization growing out of the discovery of gold and diamonds. This increased colonial interest in Southern Africa and in turn spurred African resistance. In this vein we will study anti-colonial struggles, the formation of the ANC, Nelson Mandela’s famous, “Statement from the Dock” in 1964, the Soweto Uprising of 1976 and the unprecedented peaceful transition to democracy. Our course ends looking at the legacy of Apartheid: lingering poverty, HIV/AIDS and reconciliation.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 300-level, or permission of the instructor.
Note: Post-1815; Other Regions. Students who successfully completed HIST 399.6 or 499.6 South Africa Taught Abroad may not take this course for credit.


HIST 488.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in History of Development

Research seminar on development requiring work with primary sources, in-depth discussion of themes and topics, and the preparation of major research papers.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Other Regions; temporal description will vary. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 492.6
Ethnohistory Fieldschool Community Based Experiential Learning

This unique community-based experiential fieldschool learning opportunity involves students and faculty spending four weeks living in an Aboriginal community. Initially students attend seminars led by faculty on ethnohistory theory and method, including critical responses to the field as it has been practiced. These include readings that focus on the regional ethnohistory as well as the broader thematic, theoretical, and historiographic literature. Finally, the students, under the guidance of faculty and Aboriginal mentors, engage in independent concentrated research projects that have been identified as important by the Aboriginal community.

Permission of the instructor required.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different. Post-1815; North America


HIST 494.0
Michael Swan Honours Colloquium

Oral presentation of a historical paper at a conference of Honours students. The presentation is normally based on a paper already prepared, or in preparation, for a third- or fourth-year seminar course.

Restriction(s): Admission to an honours program in history.
Note: HIST 494 is required for all Honours and Double Honours programs.


HIST 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

HIST 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

HIST 801.3 — 1/2(3S)
Studies in Ancient and Medieval History

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially.


HIST 811.3 — 1/2(3S)
Studies in the History of Colonialism

Explores the 'civilizing mission' that accompanied the spread of colonialism. Most countries argued that their endeavours benefited those who were to be colonized. They argued that colonialism would improve the habits of the colonized in economics, culture, religion, health, and sanitation. While almost universal in the colonial context, this argument was prevalent in the period of 'late' colonialism through the latter part of the 19th century and into the early 20th century. The course concentrates on its expression in Africa and India, with occasional examples drawn from the Caribbean and elsewhere. It focuses on general discussions of the civilizing mission then explores these arguments in more detail through an examination of specific elements of the ways colonial regimes attempted to alter the behaviour of the colonized and through examinations of how the colonizers came to believe they understood the colonized.

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially.


HIST 812.3 — 1/2(3S)
Studies in the History of Violence

Examines theories in the multidisciplinary field of genocide studies and analyzes examples of genocide/mass killing within a comparative context. However, the course is built around themes rather than individual cases. Over the past three decades, these chosen themes have attracted strong scholarly interest. They include the definitions and typologies of genocide/mass killings by historians and social scientists; the many diverse factors that explain them; the nature of mass killings before the 20th century (especially those tied to imperial expansion and settler colonialism); modernity and mass violence; the role of leaders in planning and executing mass killings; popular participation in mass killings; religion as a factor in mass killing; gender and mass violence; the prosecution of perpetrators; and genocide prevention. The majority of the cases that we will examine occurred in the 20th century.

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially.


HIST 820.6 — 1&2(3S)
Themes in Early Modern European History

HIST 831.3 — 1/2(3S)
Studies in Modern European History

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially.


HIST 840.6 — 1&2(3S)
Themes in British and Imperial History

HIST 850.6 — 1&2(3S)
Themes in Canadian History

HIST 859.3 — 2(3S)
Studies in Canadian History

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially.


HIST 860.6 — 1&2(3S)
Themes in Western Canadian History

HIST 861.3 — 1/2(3S)
Studies in Western Canadian History

HIST 870.6 — 1&2(3S)
Themes in the Americas

HIST 871.3 — 1/2(3S)
Studies in the Americas

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially.


HIST 880.3 — 1/2(3S)
History of History

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially.


HIST 881.3 — 1/2(3S)
Historiography

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 883.3 — 3S
Methods in Historical Research

This course is intended to help graduate students learn how to be a professional historian, practice writing proposals and think about the ways in which histories are crafted. We will consider shared professional standards, discuss different sources and approaches, and reflect on how one's approach shapes history writing.

HIST 884.3 — 1(3S)
Writing History

This course examines the craft of writing history and other forms of non-fiction by using a workshop approach to improve and enhance student writing skills and provide them with a better understanding and appreciation of the writing craft. Students will develop the tools and skills to write better history by studying the examples of established writers, learning the fundamentals of writing through in-class assignments, and participating in discussions of one another's work.

Restriction(s): Admission to the M.A. program in History.


HIST 898.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

HIST 899.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

HIST 990 — 2(1.5S-1.5R)
Seminar

Students and faculty will make presentations concerning their current research. All candidates for a graduate degree must make one presentation. Attendance is required throughout the graduate program.

HIST 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

HIST 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.