This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2017 to April 2018.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2017-2018, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

INCC 110.1 — 3.25L
Digital Literacy and Culture Designing for Print and Screen

Designing a document, whether for print or for display on a screen, means more than just making it “look good.” It is the designer’s job to make the document function better by capturing the viewer’s attention, highlighting important information, and removing any distractions, all with an eye towards more effectively communicating the document’s message. In this class we will discuss how graphic design principles can be used to improve visual communications, and we will learn to use industry-standard software for graphic design, Adobe Illustrator. After the initial introductory class, the course will be structured around students working through instructional videos on Lynda.com before class. Class time will be spent on discussion, expanding on the material presented in the videos, and applying the techniques.

Note: This course will be offered in a 4 week period.


INCC 120.1
Creativity Spoken Word

This course will introduce first-year students to the art form of spoken word poetry. The course will provide a brief overview of the history of spoken word, focusing on seminal practitioners of spoken word such as Linton Kwesi-Johnson, Lillian Allen, Shane Koyczan, and Eekwol. The course will explore spoken word as a form of political activism. Students will create and perform their own spoken word piece. Special attention will be given to local spoken word artists such as Charles Hamilton, Shana Stock, and Cody Dill etc. Documentary films may be shown in class and are listed in the Course Syllabus. The community will serve as the experiential learning site for this course, giving students access to diverse cultures and engaging in a creative environment. Community sites could include, but are not limited to, places such as schools, public libraries, the farmers' market, The Core Neighbourhood Youth Co-Op, and Station 20 West. Specific sites will be coordinated with partnering organizations for each offering.

INCC 121.1
Emerging Creative Minds

The concept of ‘creativity’ has evolved through the centuries. For the Ancients, to create meant to imitate. Creativity has also been ascribed to divine inspiration. In our culture, creativity is equated with originality, novelty, surprise, and a certain kind of strategic intelligence. Edward de Bono writes, “[m]ore and more creativity is coming to be valued as the essential ingredient in change and progress” (Lateral Thinking, 11). Recent years have witnessed a demystification of the concept of creativity. This micro-course facilitates, through various media (ie. writing, music, visual art, etc.) students’ awareness of their own creative processes, creative agency, and ability to make something new. The course introduces students to some of the key tenets of creativity: inspiration, imagination, curiosity, risk, surprise, and problem solving.

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, providing the particular focus of the course (for instance, social justice, song writing, visual art, etc.) differs substantially. Students must consult the Interdisciplinary Centre for Culture and Creativity to ensure that the topics covered are different.


INCC 122.1
The How of Poetry

What is poetry? Despite the simplicity of this question, no two writers agree. To William Wordsworth, poetry was “the breath and finer spirit of all knowledge,” to William Carlos Williams, it was “a machine made of words.” ICCC 122.1 encourages aspiring writers of all skill levels and academic backgrounds to find their own answers to this question, while teaching them the rudimentary elements of poetic craft, the how of poetry. Through class discussion, writing exercises, and workshopping, students will explore key aspects of the writing process: reading and finding inspiration; crafting, critique, and revision; and publication.

Note: Each class will be offered in a workshop format which is standard practice for creative writing courses. The final week of the class will have an additional hour for presentation of student work.


INCC 123.1
Fiction in a Flash

Flash fiction offers the punch of a novel in a fraction of the time. In 1000 words or less, flash fiction can depict complex characters, intricate plots, and evocative settings – all the crucial elements of long- form fiction. INCC 123.1 teaches students the rudimentary elements of writing as they craft their own pieces of flash fiction and micro-fiction. Through class discussion, writing exercises, and workshopping, students will explore key aspects of the writing process: reading and finding inspiration; crafting, critique, and revision; and publication.

Note: Each class will be offered in a workshop format which is standard practice for creative writing courses. The final week of the class will have an additional hour for presentation of student work.


INCC 150.1
Material Culture and Historical Communication in a Museum Setting

The purpose of this micro-course is to offer students an introduction to the use of material culture objects by museums to communicate the heritage and history of a past civilization/culture. The course will familiarize students with research and exhibition methods and theories surrounding the display of cultural artefacts in the museum setting. The Museum of Antiquities’ collections and gallery will serve as the lab for this course, giving students hands-on access to diverse cultural artefacts. Students will then apply the knowledge and theory gained through class discussions towards the development of an exhibit storyboard and proposal for an object or objects in the Museum’s collections.

Note: This course is offered over 6 weeks (2 hour seminar each week). Students with credit for ARCH 403 or CMRS 403 may not take this course for credit. Students with credit for INCC 150 may take ARCH 403 or CMRS 403 subsequently, for credit.


INCC 201.3 — 2(2S-2P)
Dynamics of Community Involvement

This community service-learning (CSL) course introduces students to local community issues and organizations, exploring concepts related to community involvement in Saskatoon and beyond. The course combines traditional in-class learning with experiential, hands-on learning in the community. Practical experiences in the community will serve to expand students' academic knowledge of community involvement, and vice versa. Students will spend two hours per week in the classroom and will be placed with a local community-based organization for an additional two hours per week, except during Alternative Reading Week (ARW) in February, when they will participate in ARW activities. In lieu of a final exam, students will have the opportunity to work with University and community partners on a community project. This course is applicable to many disciplines and fields of study, and students will be encouraged to make links between their own academic interests and the course material.

Formerly: Offered as INTS 298 and INTS 201
Prerequisite(s): 30 credit units completed at the University of Saskatchewan.
Note: Students with credit for INTS 201 will not receive credit for this course. This course may be used in the General or Elective requirement for Arts & Science programs.


INCC 202.1 — 1/2(1S)
Pathways in the Humanities and Fine Arts

This course provides a place for discussions about courses, the connections between them and the purposes to which they lead. In weekly seminars, small groups of studentsmet with a faculty mentor to consider how the premises, emphases, and approaches of the various courses they are taking intersect, compete, and merge. Through these discussions, you will deepen your understanding of academic, professional, and personal goals, yours and others'. In the process, you will identify areas that complement your intended field of study. You will find some points of reference by which to measure the growth and direction of your learning. Offered at the 200-level, INCC 202 is open to students at any stage of their program after they have completed 21 credits.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 21 credit units of university level courses.


INCC 210.3 — 1/2(1L-2P)
Digital Communication and Design Introduction to Methods and Applications

This is a hands-on course focusing on the techniques and methods of digital communications and multimedia design. The modules for this methods course include Photoshop; Film & Film editing; Web 2.0 apps; html and basic website design. The course is primarily lab-based, with graded assignments for each module. The course is introductory, and provides a foundation on which to build further technical skills. There is no final exam as students will be marked on their labs and portfolio of work. The portfolio will be a CD or website that approximates what students would provide when applying for employment, and will be marked on the basis of organization of materials (user-interface design), language (appropriateness and clarity), and quality of technical production.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units including 3 credit units of ENG courses.
Note: A 100-level ART course is recommended prior to or concurrent with this course.


INCC 220.1 — 1/2(1S)
Jazz and Related Creative Studies Capstone Course

This course serves as the summative experience for students enrolled in the 15 CU Certificate of Proficiency in Jazz and Related Creative Studies. The final project for this course will be a 30 minute - 1 hour public performance of the student’s original work via an art performance piece which has jazz music as one of the central themes and/or components.

Permission of the Department required.
Note: This course is the final requirement for the Certificate of Proficiency in Jazz and Related Creative Studies, and is intended to be taken in the last term of that program.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 184.3
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): MUS 175.3 and MUS 283.3


INCC 298.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

INCC 299.6
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

INCC 310.3 — 1(2L-3P)
Cultural Heritage Mapping

An experiential project-based course involving supervised community-based research. Working in close collaboration with community representatives, small interdisciplinary groups will research a community-defined cultural heritage spatial project. A lecture component will teach concepts of cultural heritage and cultural space theory. Heritage mapping methods including oral interviewing, archival research, and digital geodatabase construction are introduced. Student creative work in the form of maps, web displays, and artistic works will be presented to the community for public use. Registration by students from any discipline is encouraged.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 24 credit units, submission of an application letter, and permission of the instructor
Note: Students will be required to complete 15 hours of self-directed fieldwork in addition to lecture/lab requirements.


INCC 311.3
Digital Storytelling and New Media Poetics

Digital stories are expressed through a variety of media, including visual, verbal, interactive, textual, and acoustic elements. This emerging genre employs many different techniques and platforms, including interactive programing, social computing, hypertexts, narrative games, screencasts, animations, slideshows, digital films, or any combination of a number of multimedia formats to tell stories. In this course you will create your own digital narrative or poetry. Digital Storytelling and New Media Poetics is offered in partnership with Sage Hill Writing Experience so that students benefit from learning alongside creative practitioners from an expert in multimedia design and storytelling. Instruction occurs within a deep-immersion and intense 10 days in the spring or summer.

Prerequisite(s): INCC 210.3; or permission of the instructor.
Note: This course may be offered off-campus, outside of Saskatoon. This is an intensive course: attendance is mandatory. There will be a program fee to cover costs of food and accommodation.


INCC 380.3 — 2
Internship in Librarianship and Information Studies

The internship in librarianship and information studies is intended to introduce undergraduates to professional librarianship, with an emphasis on an academic library setting. The work experience (70-75 hours during the term) focuses on central elements of librarianship (professional practice, professional service, and scholarship) in the University Library. In addition, the roles of libraries in current information and academic environments will be studied in weekly seminars.

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units of university courses and permission from the instructor.


INCC 398.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

INCC 399.6
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

INCC 401.3 — 1/2(1L-2P)
Digital Culture and New Media Capstone Collaborative Design Project

A capstone design course in which advanced principles of history, theory, and design are applied to a suitable interdisciplinary project in new media creation and commentary. The course, which builds upon the foundations established throughout the course of study, focuses on approaches to be taken in defining project objectives and scope, researching suitable contexts, and designing and implementing a new media project. Design philosophy and methods are discussed and explored in the context of the particular assignment. The course requires that the students work in groups to achieve a unified production, which may include a formal essay in addition to blogs, digital films, art, and/or soundscapes published online. Group interaction and performance is monitored throughout. When possible, guest lectures from various industrial and other representatives will be provided to enhance the student's design experience.

Prerequisite(s): 75 credit units including INCC 210.3.
Note: This is the capstone course for the Minor in Digital Culture and New Media. Students should have completed the majority of courses required for the minor prior to taking this course.


INCC 498.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

INCC 499.6
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

INCC 801.0 — 1/2(2T)
Reading French

Designed to develop student's French reading skills particularly for research purposes. Primary emphasis is on the comprehension of a wide variety of texts in French.

INCC 898.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.