This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2017 to April 2018.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2017-2018, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

IS 110.3 — 1(3L)
Global Issues

This course is an introduction to conceptual, theoretical and substantive aspects of globalization and global issues. It examines political, economic and social dimensions of globalization and specific contemporary global issues, including migration, terrorism, security, crime, development, poverty, food, health, education, energy, environment, and trade.

IS 201.3 — 1(3L)
Global Citizenship Cultures and Coexistence

The objective of this course is to introduce students to various aspects of global citizenship, global cultures and coexistence. Special emphasis is devoted to two important and interrelated questions. First, what are or what should be the roles, rights and responsibilities of individual and groups in an increasingly globalized world? Second, what are the implications of cultural plurality for a globalized world, and vice versa? Third, what forms and degrees of coexistence have emerged to date and will likely emerge in the future? This course will facilitate efforts of students to answer such questions.

IS 202.0
Global Experiential and Cultural Learning

This zero credit unit course is designed to recognize global experiential learning acquired by students through various means deemed valid by the Program Director or Coordinator/Administrator, including: (a) studying abroad; (b) completing an internship abroad with a bona fide international, regional or local organization; or (c) working or serving abroad with any governmental or non-governmental agency or corporate entity. An alternative means of meeting the global experiential learning requirements of this course is to serve as an intern or a volunteer for at least sixty hours with any agency or company that deals with international issues, relations, immigrants, or international students, or any other organization that provides students with learning opportunities that provide them with valuable insights on global issues deemed valid by the program Director or Coordinator/Administrator. In addition to experiential learning, this course will also provide students with materials and assignments related to cultural learning designed to develop what is commonly referred to as cultural competency.

Permission of the department is required.
Note: This is a required course in the Certificate of Proficiency in Global Studies program. Contact the Department of Political Studies for more information and permission to register.


IS 211.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to International Studies Development

International Development is one of the cornerstones of the International Studies program. In a world that is increasingly interconnected and interdependent, it is imperative to understand the conditions under which a majority of the world lives, how these conditions have come to be, what is being done to address concerns of inherent inequity and poverty, and the importance of doing so. This means engaging in the issues of colonialism, globalization, gender, debt, trade, democracy, sustainable development, migration, health, education, and the emerging powers to name but a few. To make sense of such a diverse and complex set of issues, the course has three primary objectives: first, to contextualize international development into its historical setting; second, to introduce the theories which seek to understand and explain international development; third, to apply these theoretical constructs to specific issues and cases of international development. This course is intended to not only provide an introduction to International Development but also highlight the importance of this subject to both understanding the world as it is, the problems that we face, and the means to address to them.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units at the 100-level including at least 12 credit units from ANTH, ECON, GEOG, HIST, POLS, RLST, RUSS, SOC, SPAN, UKR, WGST.
Note:Students who have taken IS 200.6 may not take this course for credit.


IS 212.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to International Studies Cooperation and Conflict

International Studies 212 is designed to provide students with an introduction to the issues, achievements, controversies, challenges and possibilities of the contemporary world. It is well known that we live in an age of intense international engagement. Countries and peoples are tied together by economics and trade, migration, environmental realities, and popular culture while also divided by religions, values, ideologies, issues of military and economic power, and ethnic conflicts. It is difficult to make sense of the complex interactions and tensions that define our world. In IS 200, we will look at patterns of conflict in international affairs, from world wars to ideological clashes and social protests, and the processes and institutions of cooperation, which range from the United Nations and a variety of political conventions to broadly based social movements that seek to address the inequities and unfairness of the modern era.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units at the 100-level including at least 12 credit units from ANTH, ECON, GEOG, HIST, POLS, RLST, RUSS, SOC, SPAN, UKR, WGST.
Note:Students who have taken IS 200.6 may not take this course for credit.


IS 298.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

IS 299.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

IS 388.3 — 1/2(1S)
Independent Research

Offers senior International Studies students the opportunity to do an interdisciplinary Independent Research course. This will be most attractive to students away from the university on study trips. It is also available for students on campus who wish to do an independent research project with the supervision of a faculty member. Research projects and topics must be approved by the International Studies Administrative Committee.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the International Studies Advisor (Department of Political Studies) and the project supervisor.


IS 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

IS 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

IS 401.3 — 1&2(3S)
International Cooperation and Conflict

Explores the contribution which interdisciplinary theory and research make toward understanding international issues, particularly international cooperation and conflict. Topics will include nationalism and ethnicity, the role of international organizations in conflict resolution and democratization, human rights, militarism and peacekeeping.

Prerequisite(s): IS 211.3 and IS 212.3; or the permission of the IS Chair.
Note: Students for credit for IS 400 may not take this course for credit.


IS 402.3 — 1&2(3S)
International Development

This seminar explores the contribution which interdisciplinary theory and research make toward understanding international issues, particularly international development. Topics will include theoretical conceptualization of development and sustainability, global poverty and inequality, the globalization debate, foreign aid and structural instabilities.

Prerequisite(s): IS 211.3 and IS 212.3; or the permission of the IS Chair.
Note: Students with credit for IS 400 may not take this course for credit.


IS 404.0
International Studies Honours Colloquium

An oral presentation in a colloquium setting of a paper pertinent to the student's area of concentration in International Studies. The presentation will normally be based on a paper already prepared, or in preparation, for a 300 or 400 level course.

Restriction(s): Fourth year honours student in any International Studies Stream.


IS 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

IS 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.