This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2015 to April 2016.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2015-2016, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

LING 110.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Grammar

Provides a survey of classical English grammar. It covers word classes, roles of constructing phrases, clauses, and sentences in English. Challenging areas of English grammar such as passive, tense, aspect, participles, gerunds, will be studied in detail. Finally, aspects of grammar pertinent to teaching English as a foreign language will be studied.

LING 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
Structure of Language

An introduction to the findings, theories and methods of modern structural linguistics. Includes phonetics, phonology, word-formation, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Basic analytical skills are emphasized. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of natural languages.

LING 112.3 — 1/2(3L)
Dynamics of Language

An introduction to language acquisition, dialectology and historical linguistics. Includes how language varies geographically and socially, how it changes, borrowing, common descent and typological similarities among languages. The human biological propensity to acquire language and language universals are considered.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111.


LING 241.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Introduction to Syntax

Advanced introduction to traditional, structural, and transformational models of grammar. Emphasizes recent trends in linguistic analysis and theory. Natural language data will be analyzed extensively.

Prerequisite(s): LING 110, or LING 111, or permission of the department.


LING 242.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Phonetics

Introduces articulatory phonetics, the structure and functioning of the vocal tract, the major classes of speech sounds and systems of phonetic notation. A brief discussion of acoustic and perceptual phonetics will be given. Recognition, production and notation of speech sounds and the preliminaries of phonological analysis will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111.


LING 243.3 — 1/2(3L)
Morphological Patterns in Language

Investigates the internal structure of words and the rules by which words are formed. Material from a wide variety of languages is drawn upon to explore morphological processes, their relationship to syntactic structures, and to language typology. Practical work in morphological analysis is emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111.


LING 244.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociolinguistics

Presents language in its social context, covering aspects of linguistic variation within and across speech communities. Topics include language and class, gender, age, speech context and ethnicity. Language standardization, code-switching, bilingualism and diglossia, rules of conversation and appropriate address, and societal features of language change will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111 and one of LING 112; or SOC 111; or SOC 112; or WGST 210.


LING 245.3 — SP(3L)
Lexicology

General Lexicology is one of the basic courses of theoretical linguistics. This course addresses fundamental issues of general lexicology and lexicography. It provides understanding of the lexis as a systemic whole, its development, latest theories about the processes. The course focuses on the basic unit of the language word (lexeme), its structure, meaning, etymology, variants. The word is viewed in three aspects: structural, semantic and functional. There is thorough treatment of word-formation, its historical development, semantic and morphological aspects. Much attention is paid to phraseology. Lexicographical issues cover entries, dictionary types and size, explanations, translation, computer dictionaries, databases. The course will also dwell upon aspects of stylistics from the lexicological point of view. Examples will come from many languages including English, German, Russian, Italian, Estonian, etc.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111 and LING 112.


LING 247.3 — SP(3L)
The Worlds Major Languages

Gives an overview of six most influential languages of the world: English, French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic and Chinese. The course explores the main concepts of geographical linguistics, factors that make a language influential, globalization and language ideology, the language life cycle and the role of globalization in language obsolescence. The focus will be on the spread of each of these languages in two aspects: geographical-historical (the origins of the languages, their spread in space and time) and socio-cultural (linguistic variation, language as national identity marker). A considerable portion of time will be devoted to the linguistic portraying of these languages: characterization of their typological features on the levels of phonology, grammar and syntax, as well as study of fragments constituting their different linguistics pictures of the world.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111 and LING 112.


LING 248.3 — 1/2(3L)
Second Language Acquisition

The course provides an overview of second language acquisition theories. It considers views on the nature of language learning, on first and second language acquisition and native/non-native language processing.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111 and LING 112.


LING 250.3 — 1/2(3L)
World Englishes

This course provides an overview of the major varieties of English spoken today around the world. Different geographical varieties of English will be addressed and discussed with respect to core components of their phonology, phonetics, morphology, lexicon, and sentence structure. The course also examines factors in the development of language variation in the context of English such as language change, language planning, migration, language contact, and second language teaching.

Prerequisite(s): LING 110.3 or LING 111.3 or 24 credit units at the university level


LING 251.3 — 1/2(3L)
Intercultural Communication

This course provides learners with an understanding of the challenges on communication across cultures, ethnicities and social groups; and of managing these challenges. Intercultural communication considers patterns of interaction across cultures, social attitudes, thought patterns employed by individuals from different socio-cultural backgrounds to produce and interpret messages. While examples are drawn from a variety of world regions, the course will focus predominantly on the comparison of Canadian/North American and Asian (China, Japan, Russia, Middle East countries) communication patterns. This course will help Canadian born students as well as international and immigrant students to function better in a multicultural environment and develop their intercultural communication skills.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111 or 24 credit units of university courses


LING 252.3 — 1/2(3L)
Languages and Cultures of Canada

This course provides an overview of linguistic and linguo-cultural landscape of Canada. The three groups of Canadian languages are investigated: national languages of Canada (Canadian English and its dialectal varieties, Canadian French and its dialectal varieties), heritage languages of Canada (examples will be drawn from a variety of languages), and Aboriginal languages of Canada (by linguistic group and by region). The language-culture correspondences will be explored.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111 or 24 credit units of university courses.


LING 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.



LING 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.



LING 340.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Principles of Phonology

Basic concepts of phonology and the procedures of phonological analysis are introduced, with an emphasis on generative phonology. Data from a variety of natural languages is analyzed.

Formerly: LING 240.3
Prerequisite(s): LING 111; or permission of the department.
Note: Students with credit for LING 240 may not take this course for credit.


LING 341.3 — 1/2(3L)
Semantics

Will introduce advanced linguistics students to the foundations of lexical and grammatical semantics. It will also deal with the semantics-pragmatics interface and introduce students to the basics of formal semantics in order to enable them to work with computational models of language and learn how to do simple semantic processing.

Prerequisite(s): LING 241 or permission of the department.


LING 342.3 — 1/2(3L)
Aboriginal Languages of Canada

Linguistic structures of native America, with special reference to the families of North America. Genetic relationship and areal typology will be included.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111 and at least one of the following: LING 112, NS 107, or CREE 101.


LING 343.3 — 1/2(3L)
Child Language Development

This course provides an overview of the field of first language acquisition. It examines issues of language development from the child's birth to high school graduation. The coursematerials address a variety of topics in applied linguistics, such as linguistic development in infancy, acquisition of linguistic ability in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and speaking skills. Furthermore, it examines underlying factors that may lead to atypical language development and evaluates language-therapeutic approaches in addressing those factors. It also includes a practical component applying and evaluating research methodology in child language research.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): LING 111 and LING 112


LING 345.3 — 1(3L)
Introduction to Linguistic Research

Provides an undergraduate-level introduction to research methods in their application to language and linguistics studies. The major focus is on research methodology: project design, data collection, and data analysis. Students will develop practical skills in writing research proposals and grant applications.

Formerly: LING 298.3.
Prerequisite(s): LING 111, LING 112, 6 credit units of senior Linguistics.


LING 346.3 — 1/2(3L)
Language in Time and Space

An introduction to the historical linguistics of unwritten and written languages. Topics will include genetic and topological relationship, comparative reconstruction, dialect formation, phonological, morphological and semantic change, and writing systems. The integration of linguistics with prehistory and historical ethnology will be emphasized.

Formerly: LING 246.
Prerequisite(s): LING 112.
Note: Students with credit for LING 246 may not take this course for credit.


LING 347.3 — 1(3L)
Conversation and Discourse Analysis

The course will introduce students to conversation and discourse analysis. It will deal with the foundations of pragmatics, such as speech acts, felicity conditions and the cooperative principle in conversation. Later, the focus will shift to discourse analysis in which language use is examined within its sociocultural context. Students will be introduced to current research paradigms such as critical discourse analysis and sociocultural theory. Finally, the implications of research findings on language teaching within a communicative framework will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111.


LING 348.3 — 1/2(3L)
Principles of Materials Design in Second Language Acquisition

Introduces students to key applied linguistic principles and criteria used in assessing and selecting materials in second/foreign language teaching. The course addresses the main types of materials available to ESL teachers and develops skills in adapting and developing materials for second/foreign language acquisition.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111.3, LING 112.3 and 6 credit units 200, 300 or 400-level LING.


LING 349.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Computational Linguistics

The course will introduce advanced linguistic students to the foundations of computational linguistics. Using freely available resources for natural language processing, students will be introduced to corpus linguistics, data mining, tokenizing, part-of-speech-tagging, morphological analysis and syntactic parsing.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of LING or CMPT; or permission of department.
Note: Participants should have completed LING 111 and at least one other Linguistics course at 200 or 300-Level. Alternatively they should have completed at least 6 credit units of Computer Science courses.


LING 350.3
Career Internship

This course provides students with an internship experience which allows them to develop a better appreciation of the relationship between their studies and potential careers routes as well as develop leadership roles in community while fostering the outreach connections between the university and community.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum 48 credit units of university study and permission of the Linguistics Program Chair.


LING 351.3 — 1/2(5P)
Applied Linguistics Internship

This experiential learning course provides students with an internship experience which allows them to enhance their knowledge of applied linguistics and language learning/acquisition theory, as well as to develop some teaching skills by providing individual structured tutorial sessions.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111.3; LING 112.3; one of LING 248.3, LING 251.3, LING 348.3; and 6 credit units LING courses at the 200-level or above.


LING 360.3 — 1/2(3L)
Pragmatics Language Context and Meaning

This course provides learners with a better understanding of human communication through the studies of the linguistic subfield of Pragmatics, a discipline that examines language use in context. The core concepts examined in the course include deixis (words that cannot be understood without a specific context), presupposition; conversational implicature; speech acts; and information structure.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111.3 and 3 credit units 200-level LING courses, or permission of the department.


LING 398.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

LING 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

LING 402.3 — 1(3L)
Language and Culture

Focuses on the relationship between language and culture. Language is represented as a tool for the expressing, storing and transmitting of some cultural elements. Examples are drawn from a variety of languages and include folk tales and narratives, popular song lyrics, spells, shamanism, mass media and everyday speech.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111 plus either LING 112 or LING 244, and 6 credit units of senior Linguistics courses.


LING 403.3 — 1(3L)
Research Methods in Linguistics

Helps students to develop an ability to obtain, organize, and analyze language-related experimental data. Empirical methods are explored with some attention given to data-driven quantitative methods employed in natural language analysis. The course includes language data collection, language corpora, the fundamentals of automated syntactic parsing, text classification, information extraction, tagging, and summarization.

Prerequisite(s): LING 112, 6 credit units of senior LING, and LING 345.


LING 404.3 — 1/2(3L)
Language and Gender

Focuses on the role of languages in constructing and sustaining gender in different societies around the world. Students will also examine linguistic mechanisms of creating gender divisions and stereotypes, as well as remedying gender-related inequalities.

Prerequisite(s): LING 111; and LING 244 and 3 credit units of senior LING or permission of the department.


LING 478.3 — 1/2(IS)
Honours Project

A reading course on a specialized topic combining at least two of the components of the student's program: linguistics, languages and/or literature. This course will also provide an initiation into research methods leading to a term paper.

Permission of the department and the instructor required.


LING 498.3 — 1/2(3L/2S-1R)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

LING 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

LING 803.3 — 1/2(1L-2S)
Advanced Conversation and Discourse Analysis

This course will introduce graduate students to advanced concepts in conversation and discourse analysis. It will deal with concepts in pragmatics, such as speech acts, felicity conditions and the cooperative principle in conversation. The focus will then shift to discourse analysis in which language use is examined within its sociocultural context. Students will be introduced to current research paradigms such as critical discourse analysis and sociocultural theory. Finally, the implications of research findings on language teaching within a communicative framework will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in a Graduate program.


LING 804.3 — 1/2(3L)
Research Methods for Language Teachers and Applied Linguistics

This course introduces graduate students to the fundamentals of research methods employed in experimental linguistics and applied linguistics. The course provides the students with the understanding of research design principles and gives them hands-on experience with quantitative methods for the analysis of linguistic data. This course focuses on the analysis techniques employed in natural language data processing. The range of concepts covered in class includes automated syntactic parsing, text classification, information extraction, tagging, and summarization. The students will also benefit from learning or reinforcing their previous knowledge of some data processing computer software packages, such as SPSS or Excel.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in a Graduate program.


LING 806.3 — 1/2(3L)
Syntax and Morphology for Applied Linguistics

This course introduces students to contemporary theories of syntax and morphology, discusses their role in foreign language teaching and learning, and introduces teaching methodologies for teaching morphological and syntactic rules. We will learn about contemporary theories of syntax and morphology, such as the Minimalist Program, HPSG, LFG, and the Easier Syntax approach. After considering the role of grammar in various teaching paradigms, we will examine theories of syntactic and morphological acquisition in second language learning and consider how to integrate these theories into a modern foreign language syllabus.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in a Graduate program.


LING 808.3 — 1/2(3L)
Cultural Components in Language Teaching

This course explores the interactions between language and culture with the focus on applied linguistic research as well as on second languge learning and teaching Canadian culture to language learners.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in a Graduate program.


LING 810.3 — 1/2(3L)
Language and Gender

This course focuses on the role of languages in constructing and sustaining gender in different societies around the world. Students will also examine linguistic mechanisms of creating gender divisions and stereotypes, as well as remedying gender-related in equalities.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in a Graduate program.


LING 811.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Sociolinguistic Theory and Method

This course surveys modern sociolinguistic theories as well as methods of conducting sociolinguistic research, collecting and analyzing sociolinguistic data. The theoretical approaches include linguistic relativism, language variation, sociology of language, social psychology of language, interactional sociolinguistics, ethnomethodology, and variationist sociolinguistics.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in a Graduate program.


LING 898.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

LING 899.6
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

LING 990
Seminar

Students and faculty will make presentations concerning their current research. All candidates for a graduate degree must make one presentation. Attendance is required throughout the graduate program.

LING 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

LING 996.0
Research

Students enrolled in Special Case PhD in Linguistics must register for this course. This course is designed to enhance the student’s knowledge of the subject area. Readings are assigned on an individual basis. The course is expected to prepare the student for writing the PhD thesis. Attendance is obligatory. The course in non-credited.