This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

MUS 101.3 — 1/2(3L)
Fundamentals of Music

Introduction to the basic parameters of music including notation, rhythm, intervals, melody, scales, key signatures; aural and written comprehension of the above rudiments. This course could provide foundational material for the music theory sequence.

Note: Sometimes offered as a web-based class. In this case, online materials are used and there are no scheduled lectures. Students majoring in music cannot take this course for credit. Students intending to major in music may take this course as a prerequisite for first year music courses if they do not pass the Theory Placement Exam. Students with credit for MUS 100 cannot receive credit for this course.


MUS 105.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Western Art Music

The art of listening to music; analysis of structure and form; history of the great periods in music through its literature.

Note: Involves a small cost in addition to tuition fees. Open to all students. Students majoring in music may not take this course for credit. Students with credit for MUS 109 may not take this course for credit.


MUS 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
History of Popular Music

An introduction to popular music of the United States and Canada. Organized chronologically, the course examines popular music from 1840 to present in a historical context. Fundamental musical skills (i.e. notation, directed listening) will be a component. No previous musical-specific training is required.

Note: Open to all students. Students majoring in music may not take this course as an open music elective, but may take this course as an arts elective.


MUS 120.2 — 1(3P)
Musicianship I

The first of a four-term course of study designed to develop fundamental musical skills required by professional musicians or music directors.

Formerly: MUS 119.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 101 or passing grade (65%) Music Theory Entrance Examination.
Corequisite(s): MUS 133.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 119 may not take MUS 120 for credit.


MUS 121.2 — 2(3P)
Musicianship II

The second of a four-term course of study designed to develop fundamental musical skills required by professional musicians or music educators.

Formerly: MUS 119.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 120.
Corequisite(s): MUS 134.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 119 may not take MUS 121 for credit.


MUS 125.1 — 1/2
In the Company of Music

"In the Company of Music" explores music’s ability--heuristically--to garner restorative if not healing powers. The course concentrates upon three familiar stages of the journey from fledgling musician to practicing artist, and offers coping strategies in a vocation rife with the unexpected. Struggles and rewards are the things of life, but it is not often that such realities, as they relate to music as a vocation, are brought into focus in the context of a course, a lacuna that MUS 125 addresses head on. The course is divided into three units. Unit one, “music as healer,” examines how deep artistic connection with the creative and the performative aspects of music contributes to self-awareness and self-confidence. Unit two, “engagement as commodity,” treats of balancing the twinned concerns of music as art, and music as business. Unit three, “the new norm,” grapples with the impact of technological advances that constantly outstrip an artist’s ability to keep abreast of them.

Note: Students in the Bachelor of Music in Music Education programs cannot count this course within their program requirements.


MUS 129.0 — 1/2
Recitals

Non-credit course required of all B.Mus. and B.Mus.(Mus.Ed.) students. To obtain a passing grade all students must follow the prescribed guidelines as specified in the Department of Music's Student Handbook. Students should keep open 12:30-13:30 on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and 20:00-21:30 on Thursdays and Fridays. Specific Sunday evenings are announced in September.

MUS 133.3 — 1(3L)
Fundamentals of Music Theory I

Addresses theoretical musical concepts fundamental to the discipline of music. This includes fluency in clef reading, fluency in tertian diatonic harmony (chords and scales), figured bass, 2 species part writing, and an understanding of a variety of other fundamental musical concepts such as basic acoustics, intervals, scales, tonality, tempo, meter, beat, syncopation and so on.

Formerly: MUS 113.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 101 or passing grade (65%) Music Theory Entrance Examination.
Corequisite(s): MUS 120.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 113 may not take MUS 133 for credit.


MUS 134.3 — 2(3L)
Fundamentals of Music Theory II

Discusses theoretical materials pertaining to functional harmony including functionality of all diatonic chords, secondary dominants, sequencing, cadences, and modulation (to closely related keys).

Formerly: MUS 114.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 133 (formerly MUS 113).
Corequisite(s): MUS 121.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 114 may not take MUS 134 for credit.


MUS 150.3 — 1(3L-1P)
History of Music I Western Art Music 1600 to 1830

History of Western art music with an emphasis on the main composers and their representative compositions, forms, genres, and compositional techniques including Florentine Camerata, opera, stile rappresentivo, basso continuo, cori spezzati, stile concertato, sonata da chiesa, sonata da camera, scordatura, linear/learned counterpoint, stile galant, Empfindsamer Stil, Harmoniemusik, Alberti/Merky bass.

Formerly: MUS 140.
Note: Required for all Music programs (B.A., B.Mus., and B.Ed./B.Mus.(Mus.Ed.) degrees). Students with credit for MUS 140 or MUS 240 may not take MUS 150 for credit.


MUS 151.3 — 2(3L-1P)
History of Music II Western Art Music 1815 to the Present

History of Western art music with an emphasis on the main composers and their representative compositions, forms, genres, and compositional techniques including diatonicism, chromaticism, program music, impressionism, pentatonicism, octatonicism, whole-tone scale, neo-Baroque and neo-Classicism, polytonality, atonality, dodecaphony, aggregate, row partitioning and combinatoriality, total serialism, minimalism, pointilism, chance music, electronic music.

Formerly: MUS 141/MUS 240.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 150.
Note: Required for all Music programs (B.A., B.Mus., and B.Ed./B.Mus. (Mus.Ed.) degrees). Students with credit for MUS 141 or MUS 240 may not take 151 for credit.


MUS 160.0
Keyboard Proficiency

Students will show a minimum keyboard proficiency to the Department of Music either by providing their Royal Conservatory of Music Grade IV Piano certificate (or higher) or by performing on the piano at the Royal Conservatory of Music Grade IV level. Performances will be assessed by a faculty member in the Department of Music.

Note: Bachelor of Music students who have not completed this course will be assigned faculty keyboard proficiency testers in September of every year. It is the student's responsibility to arrange assessment and testing. Students with credit for MUS 317 may not receive credit for this course.


MUS 175.3 — 1/2(3L)
Jazz History Survey

An overview of the history and evolution of jazz music. The course will include the examination and discussion of the most historically significant musicians in jazz and their music as well as the examination of the evolution of jazz music as an art form.

Formerly: MUS 285
Note: Students with credit for MUS 285 will not receive credit for this course.


MUS 180.0
Introduction to Library Research Methods

This is a non-credit course required for all B.Mus. B.Mus.(Mus.Ed.), and B.A. students majoring in music. The course addresses the nature of information and the role of the library in the research process. Course work will cover an introduction to music research; finding, evaluating, and using information including printed and recorded music and research on music; appropriate referencing of sources for writing scholarly program notes.

Restriction(s): This course is only open to students in the B.A. in Music and B.Mus. programs.
Note: Students majoring in Music are encouraged to take this course in their first term of their first year of studies.


MUS 184.3 — 1/2(3L)
Jazz Materials

Course includes development of jazz theory, ear training, transcribing and keyboard skills. This course is the prerequisite to Jazz Improvisation (MUS 283.3) and Jazz Arranging (MUS 386.3). This course is the suggested co-requisite for Jazz Pedagogy (EMUS 337.3) and Jazz Ensemble. MUS 184.3 is open to students of all colleges.

MUS 203.3 — 2(3L)
Introduction to Composition

Familiarizes students with issues composers consider when creating music. Designed to benefit all students of the Department with an interest in musicianship through immersion in composing, improvising, and learning about musical forms - old and new. It is structured around the active participation of students as composers, performers, and analysts.

Formerly: MUS 202
Prerequisite(s): MUS 134 or permission of the department
Note:Students with credit for MUS 202 may not take MUS 203 for credit.


MUS 220.2 — 1(3P)
Musicianship III

Third of a four-term course of study designed to develop fundamental musical skills required by professional musicians/music educators.

Formerly: MUS 219.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 121.
Corequisite(s): MUS 233.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 219 may not take MUS 220 for credit.


MUS 221.2 — 2(3P)
Musicianship IV

Fourth of a four-term course of study designed to develop fundamental musical skills required by professional musicians or music educators.

Formerly: MUS 219.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 220.
Corequisite(s): MUS 234.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 219 may not take MUS 221 for credit.


MUS 229.0 — 1/2
Recitals

Non-credit course required of all B.Mus. and B.Mus.(Mus.Ed.) students. To obtain a passing grade all students must follow the prescribed guidelines as specified in the Department of Music's Student Handbook. Students should keep open 12:30-13:30 on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and 20:00-21:30 on Thursdays and Fridays. Specific Sunday evenings are announced in September.

MUS 233.3 — 1(3L)
Fundamentals of Music Theory III

Discusses theoretical materials pertaining to formal structure (i.e.: binary, ternary, rondo, sonata form) and will continue at a more sophisticated level, the theoretical musical concepts introduced in Fundamentals of Music Theory II (ie. : phrasing, tonic expansion, cadences, secondary dominant strings, rhythmic and melodic motifs, chord intensification, tonicization, augmented 6th chords (all), modal mixture, chromatic mediants, introduction to chromatic functional harmony and advanced voice-leading, comprehensive study of all subdominants (pre-dominants) and modulations within all key relationships).

Formerly: MUS 213.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 134 (or 114).
Corequisite(s): MUS 220.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 213 may not take MUS 233 for credit.


MUS 234.3 — 2(3L)
Fundamentals of Music Theory IV

Introduces students to many of the theoretical musical materials explored by a variety of composers in the 20th Century. This includes the study of synthetic scales (ie.: octatonic, whole tone, etc.) chromatic polymodality, set theory analysis, ordered tone rows and serialism, twelve-tone matrixes and an exploration of a variety of new ways to organize musical parameters and their contemporary notation.

Formerly: MUS 214.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 233 (or 213).
Corequisite(s): MUS 221.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 214 may not take MUS 234 for credit.


MUS 242.1 — 1/2(1L)
Diction for Singers English Latin and Italian

Will present an introduction to International Phonetic spelling and Symbols along with appropriate pronunciation for vocal repertoire in English, Latin, and Italian languages. Classes meet once weekly for one hour. Students will bring repertoire they are currently studying to be mixed with other fundamental works that highlight the various idiosyncrasies of a singer's diction in these languages.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 133 or permission of the department.


MUS 243.1 — 2(1L)
Diction for Singers II German

Will present an introduction to International Phonetic spelling and Symbols along with appropriate pronunciation for vocal repertoire in the German language. Classes meet once weekly for one (1) hour. Students will bring repertoire they are currently studying to be mixed with other fundamental works that highlight the various idiosyncrasies of singer's diction in this language.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 133 or permission of the Department of Music.


MUS 244.1 — 2(1L)
Diction For Singers III French

Will present an introduction to International Phonetic spelling and Symbols along with appropriate pronunciation for vocal repertoire in the French language. Classes meet once weekly for one (1) hour. Students will bring repertoire they are currently studying to be mixed with other fundamental works that highlight the various idiosyncrasies of singer's diction in this language.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 133.3 or permission of the Department of Music.


MUS 250.3 — 1/2(3L)
History of Music III Western Art Music Antiquity to High Renaissance

History of Western art music with an emphasis on the main composers and their representative compositions, forms, genres, and compositional techniques including Greeksystema teleion, Guidonian system, melodic/rhythmic modes; artes liberales, missa ordinarium, proprium, officium; monophony and early polyphony, rhythmic/melodic notation, organology, fauxbourdon, falsobordone, Reformation, Counter-Reformation, Anglican church music, intabulations.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151 or permission of the department.
Note: Students who completed MUS 150 and 151 prior to the fall of 2011 will find that there is overlap of content with the new MUS 250.3 course, as this course effectively "spreads out" the information from the original MUS 150 and 151 into three courses: MUS 150, 151 and 250.


MUS 283.3 — 1/2(3L)
Jazz Improvisation

Focuses on the study and development of musical skills as they pertain to the performance of jazz improvisation. Topics such as basic jazz-related theory; chord/scale relationships; motivic, chord based and modal improvisations are presented in a systematic manner. This course assumes no pre-existing knowledge base of jazz improvisation but does presume a basic working knowledge and control over any given musical instrument. This course is open to all instrumentalists.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 184.


MUS 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

MUS 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

MUS 307.3 — 1(3L)
Orchestration I

A study of the art of orchestration and its practical application to strings, woodwinds and horn. The various styles of scoring, from Bach to the 20th Century, will be analyzed as well as discussion on the history of orchestration. Emphasis will be placed on arranging for full orchestra with particular attention to string, woodwind and horn sections.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 234.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 305 cannot take this course for credit.


MUS 311.3 — 1/2(3L)
History of Opera

A survey study of the history of opera from the Florentines to modern times.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 310 cannot receive credit for this course.


MUS 312.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Vocal Literature

Song literature of various western cultures will be studied toward acquiring a broad awareness of the vast repertoire of song.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): Two years of applied voice training, MUS 151 (formerly MUS 141/240) and 234 (formerly MUS 214).
Note: Students with credit for MUS 253 cannot receive credit for this course.


MUS 313.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Science and Sound of Singing

A scientific and pedagogical study of the process of singing, with an emphasis on combining these facets of study toward a better understanding for use as artists and vocal instructors.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): Two years of applied voice training and MUS 234.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 356 cannot receive credit for this course.


MUS 325.3 — 1/2(3L)
Conducting Introduction

An introduction to the basic grammar of conducting choral and instrumental music.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): MUS 233 (or MUS 213) or permission of the department.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for EMUS 335 and MUS 325.


MUS 326.3 — 1/2(3L)
Conducting Intermediate

A continuation of the introductory course in conducting choral and instrumental music with emphasis on score analysis, study, interpretation and performance.


Prerequisite(s): MUS 325 (or EMUS 335).
Note: Students cannot receive credit for EMUS 336 and MUS 326.


MUS 329.0 — 1/2
Recitals

Non-credit course required of all B.Mus. and B.Mus.(Mus.Ed.) students. To obtain a passing grade all students must follow the prescribed guidelines as specified in the Department of Music's Student Handbook. Students should keep open 12:30-13:30 on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and 20:00-21:30 on Thursdays and Fridays. Specific Sunday evenings are announced in September.

MUS 346.3 — 1(3L)
Pre Baroque Counterpoint

Mainly a study of 16th-century contrapuntal techniques and forms. Though general stylistic features of the music are emphasized, differences in the styles of various composers are also studied. A brief study of pre-16th-century contrapuntal music is included.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 234.


MUS 354.3 — 1/2(3L)
Survey of Keyboard Literature

A history of piano literature from the origins of the instrument to the 20th century, discussing styles, forms and interpretations of works taken from all periods.

Formerly: MUS 353.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 134 and MUS 151.


MUS 359.3 — 1/2(3L)
Piano Pedagogy

An introduction to piano pedagogy at all levels, beginning with an overview of beginning pedagogy materials, and continuing with the study of technique, etudes and graded literature, with an emphasis on performance practices from the Baroque onwards, including practical approaches to phrasing, pedalling, tone production, harmonic structure and other principles for interpretation of the literature.

Formerly: MUS 357.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 134, MUS 151 and two years of applied piano.
Note:Students with credit for MUS 357 may not take MUS 359 for credit.


MUS 363.3 — 1/2(3L)
Music of Baroque Period

A history of music from approximately 1600 to 1725. Emphasis will be on the main forms, composers and representative compositions from this period.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151 (formerly MUS 141/240).


MUS 364.3 — 1/2(3L)
Music of Classical Period

A history of music covering the Classical period from approximately 1700 to 1800. Emphasis will be on the main forms, composers and representative compositions from this period.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 250 or permission of the department.


MUS 365.3 — 1/2(3L)
Music of Romantic Period

A history of music covering the Romantic period from approximately 1800 to 1900. Emphasis will be on the main forms, composers and representative compositions from this period.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151.


MUS 367.3 — 1/2(3L)
Music of Twentieth Century

Focuses on historically prevalent ideas and on analytic techniques necessary for a definitive understanding of the Twentieth-Century revolution of musical language.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151.


MUS 368.3 — 1/2(3L)
Canadian Music

An overview of the development of music in Canada including relationships to both European folk and art music and to Aboriginal music.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151 or permission of the department.


MUS 371.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5P)
Performance Practices Twentieth Century

A study of the innovative performance techniques and changing aesthetics of 20th Century music - instrumental and vocal alike. Combines study and performance aspect of music training, allowing students to apply the information garnered in class to their own instruments or voice through the exploration of selected repertoire.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 134; MUAP 145; and one of MUS 150, MUS 151, or MUS 250 or permission of the department.
Note: Students who have credit for MUS 359 may not take this course for credit.


MUS 386.3 — 1/2(3L)
Jazz Arranging

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of jazz arranging. Areas of study include small group (combo) writing and large ensemble orchestration techniques.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 184.


MUS 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

MUS 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

MUS 428.3 — 1/2(3L)
Choral Pedagogy

A systematic study of the fundamentals of organizing and leading a choir. Topics include: the voice as instrument; auditioning and placement of singers; text, languages, and diction; warm-ups, choral balance, blend, and tone; rehearsal management, leadership, and organizing performances.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 234 and MUS 325.


MUS 429.0 — 1/2
Recitals

Non-credit course required of all B.Mus. and B.Mus.(Mus.Ed.) students. To obtain a passing grade all students must follow the prescribed guidelines as specified in the Department of Music's Student Handbook. Students should keep open 12:30-13:30 on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and 20:00-21:30 on Thursdays and Fridays. Specific Sunday evenings are announced in September.

MUS 438.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Instrumental Conducting

A study of the fundamentals of conducting a wind ensemble, to develop psycho-motor and score-reading skills, and to expand repertoires of gestures for large and small ensembles. This course deals with methods of studying instrumental curricula, selecting repertoire, analysis, planning lessons, programming, teaching musical literacy, and evaluation. Examination of materials and resources is included, as is a review of the characteristics of successful secondary school instrumental music programs.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 325 or permission of the department.


MUS 447.3 — 1/2(3L)
Structural Musical Analysis

Complete pieces of music or complete movements of compositions will be analyzed by integrating traditional analytical methods with reductive techniques and approaches based on the scientific analysis of sound and communications. The techniques are applied to music of all styles.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 234.


MUS 453.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Choral Literature and Materials

A seminar in the standard choral repertoire for mixed, male and treble chorus with focus on representative works.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 234 and MUS 250.


MUS 457.3 — 1/2(3L)
Music since 1950

A detailed study of important musical ideas and styles from 1950 to the present. Approached through the music and the theoretical writings of composers who have contributed important works during this time.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 234 and MUS 151.


MUS 463.3 — 1/2(3L)
Seminar in Wind Literature and Materials

Examines the solo and ensemble literature for winds from the Middle Ages to the present era including the wind band repertoire.

Formerly: MUS 350.
Prerequisite(s): MUS 134 and MUS 151.
Note: Students with credit for MUS 350 may not take this course for credit.


MUS 464.3 — 1/2(3L)
Research Seminar in Musicology I

A study of topics of current interest in musicology. Includes the oral presentation of research as well as the preparation of major research papers. The specific topic will be announced each time the course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151.


MUS 465.3 — 1/2(3L)
Research Seminar in Musicology II

Advanced research in musicology. The specific topic will be announced each time the course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 464.


MUS 472.3 — 1/2(3L)
Seminar in Music Bibliography and Research Techniques

A seminar designed to deepen the concepts and tools of scholarship developed in MUS 241. Emphasizes developing research skills through the preparations of lectures, lecture-recitals, and papers. Special bibliographical topics in the principal areas of music will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151.
Note: Students who have credit for MUS 354 may not take this course for credit.


MUS 474.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Music Research Topics

A seminar devoted to particular areas of study in music which are not covered by curriculum offerings.

Permission of the department required.
Note: Students must have advanced standing in a Bachelor of Music (Arts and Science) program. See Department Head for details.


MUS 485.3 — 1/2(3S)
Introduction to Shenkerian Analysis

This seminar course examines both the analytical techniques and the cultural / philosophical backdrop for one of the most seminal figures in music theory, Heinrich Schenker (1868-1935). Schenker's comprehensive approach toward understanding and assessing the organizational principles central to tonal music revolutionized the field of music theory. Schenker's methodology is firmly entrenched in the field of music theory. The course requires prior knowledge of general analytical techniques—and in particular, skills that are acquired in the two-year music theory "core," and beyond. The seminar will carry a workload commensurate with similar fourth-year offerings at the U of S.

Prerequisite(s): MUS 234 and one of MUS 346, MUS 367, MUS 447 or MUS 457; or by approval of the department.
Note: Students who took MUS 498.3 Schenkerian Analysis may not take this course for credit.


MUS 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

MUS 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

MUS 811.3 — (1S)
Applied Performance Seminar I

The intensive study of an instrument or the voice, including advanced performance techniques and selected repertoire.

Formerly: MUS 844.6
Note: Students with credit for MUS 844.6 may not take this course for credit. Only open to M.Mus. in Performance students.


MUS 812.3 — (1S)
Applied Performance Seminar II

The continuation of the intensive study of an instrument or the voice, including the further development of advanced performance techniques and the assimilation of new repertoire.

Formerly: MUS 844.6
Prerequisite(s): MUS 811.3
Note: Students with credit for MUS 844.6 may not take this course for credit. Only open to M.Mus. in Performance students


MUS 813.3 — (1S)
Applied Performance Seminar III

The continuation of the intensive study of an instrument or the voice, including the further development of advanced performance techniques and the assimilation of new repertoire.

Formerly: MUS 846.6
Prerequisite(s): MUS 812.3
Note: Students with credit for MUS 846.6 may not take this course for credit. Only open to M.Mus. in Performance students.


MUS 814.3 — (1S)
Applied Performance Seminar IV

The continuation of the intensive study of an instrument or the voice, including the further development of advanced performance techniques and the assimilation of new repertoire.

Formerly: MUS 846.6
Prerequisite(s): MUS 813.3
Note: Students with credit for MUS 846.6 may not take this course for credit. Only open to M.Mus. in Performance students.


MUS 821.3 — 1/2(3L)
Pedagogy of Music History and Musicology: Materials, Methods, and Curriculum Development

Provides an overview of multifaceted resources, relying on both primary and secondary sources, historic and contemporary, available for curriculum development including music history surveys for the major and non-major, topical classes, and seminars in musicology, organology, performance practices and paleography.

MUS 828.3 — 3L
Advanced Choral Pedagogy

A detailed and systematic study of the fundamentals of choral organization, leadership, and function. Topics include: research into the dynamics of vocal production; critical analysis and psychological process of the choral audition; research into methods and practice of the placement of singers; an analysis of language and text with respect to the International Phonetic Alphabet; a substantial and detailed examination of warmups, choral balance, blend, and tone with respect to stylistic periods and trends; rehearsal management, leadership, and organizing performances.

MUS 833.3 — 3S
Advanced Seminar in Choral Literature and Materials

A detailed examination of standard and atypical choral repertoire for mixed, male, and treble choruses. Graduate students will be expected to explore the compositions in a thorough scholarly manner as demonstrated through course work and a substantial research paper.

MUS 838.3 — 3S
Advanced Seminar in Instrumental Conducting

An advanced study of the fundamentals of organizing and leading a wind ensemble, to further develop and expand psycho-motor and score-reading skills and conducting gestures for large and small ensembles. Furthermore, the course deals with advanced methods in studying examples of instrumental curricula, selecting repertoire, comprehensive analysis, lesson planning, programming, research into teaching of musical literacy, and evaluation. Included is a detailed examination of materials and resources as well as critical research into the characteristics of successful secondary school instrumental music programs as demonstrated through course work and a substantial research paper.

MUS 852.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Performance Practices

A detailed discussion of selected problems and aspects of performance practices of a particular period or genre of music. Considers aspects of articulation, ornamentation, style, tempo, dynamics, organology, iconography, tuning and temperament and will also include the reading of selected treatises on performance practices.

MUS 853.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Musicology I

A research seminar on selected topics in musicology, chosen from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, or Baroque eras. May focus on the study of manuscripts, repertoires of monophonic and/or polyphonic music, the development of genres, the examination of style(s), the consideration of composers and significant monuments of music.

MUS 863.3 — 3S
Advanced Seminar in Instrumental Literature and Materials

A detailed examination of the standard and atypical wind instrument repertoire for large and small ensembles. Graduate students will be expected to explore the compositions in a thorough scholarly manner as demonstrated through course work and two substantial research papers.

MUS 898.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

MUS 899.6
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

MUS 992.0 — 1(3P)
Project for Master of Music Performance Majors

The major project for the MMUS degree in Performance; consists of two recitals, each approximately 60 minutes in length, accompanied by program notes. Repertoire will be chosen by the candidate and the principal advisor, and may consist of solo and/or chamber music, contingent upon student's major. A written proposal (prepared in consultation with the principal advisor) will be presented formally at a meeting of the candidate's committee. This proposal, along with program notes, must be approved by the committee. The recitals (scheduled before the end of the academic term in each year of the program) will be juried by the members of the Advisory Committee and open to the public. All Master of Music in Performance students must register in the MUS 992 according to the timelines of the Graduate Calendar. Registration for this course must be renewed until completion of the course requirements.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Master of Music Performance program.


MUS 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

MUS 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. dissertation must register for this course.

Prerequisite(s): Entry into the Ph.D. program.