This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2017 to April 2018.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2017-2018, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

PLAN 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PLAN 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PLAN 329.3 — 1/2(3L)
Integrated Water Resource Planning

The process and practice of planning for water resources in a Canadian context. A focus on water and land use policy and water governance structures including federal, provincial, First Nations and local scales of inquiry. Institutional arrangements affecting water management in Canada will be investigated. Topics will include integrated watershed management, watershed plan preparation, source water protection, alternative stormwater and wastewater management, and access to safe drinking water.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 240 or GEOG 280, or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 329 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled GEOG 329 until 2014.


PLAN 341.3 — 1/2(3L)
Urban Planning

The course examines 21st century approaches and frameworks in urban planning, situating these briefly in the evolutionary context of planning movements from the late-19th and 20th centuries. Examples of topics engaged with include: zoning, pricing and urban form; infrastructure asset management planning; neighbourhood, street and public space (re-) design; planning for multiple transport modes; Indigeneity and interculturalism in planning and design; culture planning. The course combines experiential and class-based learning. Individual and group field-based projects form a significant part of the course assessment. A field trip is incorporated into the course.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 240.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 246 or GEOG 341 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled GEOG 341 until 2014.


PLAN 342.3 — 1/2(3L)
Demographic Analysis in Planning

Detailed investigation of community planning methodology and applications, with emphasis on population and housing analysis. The causes, impacts and proposed planning solutions for major community planning problems in Canadian urban or rural areas are discussed. Computer applications and the use of statistical information in addressing problems of inner-city neighbourhoods in Saskatoon are stressed.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 240.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 247 or GEOG 342 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled GEOG 342 until 2014.


PLAN 343.3 — 1/2(3L)
Legal Issues in Planning

Designed for students interested in urban studies and planning, this course reviews legal concepts and issues associated with the functions of municipalities, and especially with their powers for controlling and planning land use. The focus wherever possible, is on Saskatchewan urban and rural areas, and on Saskatchewan legislation and case law.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 240.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 343 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled GEOG 343 until 2014.


PLAN 346.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Urban Design

A lecture/seminar on the history, context and elements of the built urban environment. Function and form, and aspects of urban aesthetics are discussed in relation to streetscapes, open spaces and heritage conservation. The relationship of urban design with trends in social thought and with cultural patterns is addressed. The studio consists of design exercises including graphic presentations and applications in computer-aided design.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 240.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 346 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled GEOG 346 until 2014.


PLAN 350.3 — 1/2(3L)
Transportation Planning and Geography

Introduces the geographical aspects of transportation theory and planning. Major topical areas that are emphasized are: travel, behaviour, network design, and planning and policy for the future.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 240 or 9 credit units from the CE Program Core.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 265 or GEOG 350 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled GEOG 350 until 2014.


PLAN 390.3 — 1/2(1L-2P)
Research and Field Methods in Planning

Applies quantitative and qualitative research methods to selected case study projects. Students will design a research framework, design any needed instruments, gather their data, and present results. Working in small groups, students will collect data using methods such as written surveys, content analysis, focus groups, and participant observation.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 240 or GEOG 280.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the RUP or GEOG programs.
Note: Students with credit for RUD 390 or RUP 390 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled RUP 390 until 2014.


PLAN 392.3 — 1/2(3S)
Early History of Geographic and Planning Thought

A lecture/seminar on the origins of urban planning and geographic thought, from prehistory and early Antiquity to late Renaissance. Relationship between inventions of copper age technology, wheeled objects in particular, and myths of the environment, along with the founding of settlements, is reviewed, leading to discussion on archaic notions of the Earth, the universe, and the Ideal City. Origins of geography and planning as scientific disciplines are further examined in the outlook of classical Greece and Rome regarding the natural and the built environments. Subsequent Medieval withdrawal in rigorous thought, particularly as reflected in various Flat Earth notions, is discussed in context of environmental myths of the Middle Ages. Emergence of rigor in environmental thought during the late Medieval period is juxtaposed with the onset of the Little Ice Age and the subsequent urbanization on the European continent. The Age of Discovery along with New World explorations, as related to Thomas More's Utopia, and to the founding of New Towns in Europe at the onset of the Renaissance, is shown as leading to early modern concepts of geography and urban planning.

Prerequisite(s): 24 credit units in geography.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 392, GEOG 405 or GEOG 495 may not take this course for credit.


PLAN 395.3 — 1/2(3S)
Planning History and Theory

This course examines several important aspects of planning history and theory in the urban and rural contexts. Notable topics include the evolution of both planning and planning theory in light of evolving community forms, infrastructure systems, and social economic and environmental conditions; comprehensive, incrementalist, and advocacy planning.

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 240.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the RUP program.
Note: Students with credit for RUP 395 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled RUP 395 until 2014.


PLAN 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PLAN 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PLAN 413.0 — (P)
Practicum in Planning

An applied course that provides students with professional experience and the ability to critique urban, rural, regional or community planning standards and procedures. The course must include a work program consisting of 40 hours approved by the Practicum Supervisor.

Prerequisite(s): Two of PLAN 341, 342 or 346.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the RUP program.
Note: A Pass/Fail grade is awarded on completion of the Practicum. Graduation in the RUP program is based on the overall average only, which does not include the P/F grade awarded in RUP 413.0. Students with credit for RUD 413 or RUP 413 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled RUP 413 until 2014.


PLAN 441.3 — 2(3L)
Challenges in Urban Development

The course focuses on the application of knowledge to contemporary challenges in urban planning and development. Emphasis is on project-based and experiential learning through group and individual projects, in-class simulation exercises, and a fieldtrip. Examples of topics engaged with include: growth management and smart growth; inner city and suburban (re-) development challenges; downtown and city centre planning; site planning; heritage and adaptive re-use; land development and subdivision design; transportation and land use planning; mediation and negotiation in urban development. Teaching will be linked with current issues in urban Saskatchewan when appropriate.

Prerequisite(s): PLAN 341, or permission of the department.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 441 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled GEOG 441 until 2014.


PLAN 442.3 — 1/2(3L/3S)
Regional Planning

Over the past century a regional approach to planning has shaped and informed the Canadian landscape as reflected in provincial programs directed at agricultural land protection, watershed conservation, and metropolitan growth strategies. This course examines the historical and present-day context for regional planning in Canada from its origins in agricultural assistance to its current manifestation in sustainable development and bioregionalism. Regional planning as a governance structure and institutional framework will be a common thread through the course. Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation and function of rural and urban landscapes from a regional perspective. Upon completion of this course students will have an appreciation for the dynamic forces shaping Canadian regions, awareness of regional governance structures, as well as an understanding of current trends in regional planning in Canada.

Prerequisite(s): PLAN 341 or PLAN 342 or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 442 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled GEOG 442 until 2014.


PLAN 445.3 — 2(3L)
Planning with Indigenous Communities

The course focuses on the application of the theory and methods of Indigenous planning and planning with Indigenous communities in reserve, rural, urban, northern, and international contexts. Emphasis is on project-based and experiential learning through group and individual projects, guest lectures and a field trip.

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units at the University and one of PLAN 329, PLAN 341, PLAN 342, GEOG 352, NRTH 332, or INDG 210.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 445 or GEOG 849 will not receive credit for this course.


PLAN 446.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Urban Design Studio

A lecture/seminar on advanced topics of the built urban environment through the study of theory, history, site context and case studies. The evolution of urban design will be considered through detailed analysis of urban form, streetscapes, open spaces and architecture. Local and global examples will be studied. The course engages students through graphic analysis, design exercises and discussion sessions. Exercises and assignments involve the use of computer-aided design software tools and techniques.

Prerequisite(s): PLAN 346.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 446 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled GEOG 446 until 2014.


PLAN 490.3 — 1/2(3S)
Senior Planning Studio

Students will focus on identifying a planning problem, identifying options, analyzing those options, and setting up the policies and tools needed to solve the problem. With help from academics and professional planners, students will pull together a comprehensive report that is both academically rigorous and built on sound planning principles.

Prerequisite(s): PLAN 390. PLAN 395 recommended.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the RUP program.
Note: Students with credit for RUD 490 or RUP 490 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled RUP 490 until 2014.


PLAN 495.3 — 1/2(3S)
Professional Planning Practice

Translates planning theory into professional practice in diverse contexts. Notable topics include enabling legislation and regulatory context, professional ethics and codes, roles and responsibilities, private and public practice, decision making, interdisciplinary practice, public participation, and current trends in planning practice. Issues are explored through seminar discussions and debates.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PLAN 395. PLAN 390 recommended.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in the RUP program.
Note: Students with credit for RUP 495 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled RUP 495 until 2014.


PLAN 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PLAN 499.3 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.