This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

PLSC GR

PLSC 201.3 — 2(3L-2P)
Field Crops of Western Canada

Provides an introduction to the major oilseed, pulse, cereal and forage crops of Western Canada. Emphasis will be on factors that affect quality of these major crops of Western Canada, their utilization and the agronomic practices used in their production. The ability to identify and understand the growth characteristics of major oilseeds, pulse, cereal and forage crops as well as the major pest problems of these crops will be covered in the laboratory. Discussions include the global role Canada plays in the production of the oilseed, pulse, cereal and forage crops and the development of improved varieties of these crops.

Prerequisite(s): AGRC 111 or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students can receive credit for only one of PLSC 201 or PLSC 222. Students with credit for PLSC 59 will not receive credit for this course.


PLSC 213.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Principles of Plant Ecology

Designed for students in the College of Agriculture. It considers the nature of ecosystems and of processes associated with energy flow and material cycling within them. Particular attention is given to ecosystems of Western Canada and the effect that man exerts on them, especially through agricultural practices.

Note: Students with credit for BIOL 253 or 228 may not take this course for credit.


PLSC 214.3 — 1/2(3L-2P)
Statistical Methods

An introduction to statistical methods and their application to experiments. Includes probability, means and variances, "t" tests, analysis of variance, experimental designs, simple regression and correlation, and chi-square tests. The lab component provides an introduction to the data analysis functions of spreadsheet software. This class is designed for students in the biological sciences. This course will be conducted online with weekly laboratory sessions.

Formerly: PLSC 314
Note: Students wishing to use this course for Arts & Science credit should refer to Statistics Course Regulations in the Arts & Science section of the Calendar. Students with credit for PLSC 314 will not receive credit for this course. Students in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources who have received credit for STAT 245 will not receive credit for this course.


PLSC 220.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Fundamentals of Horticulture

An introduction to the economic, nutritional and aesthetic value of horticulture emphasizing its importance and impact. Consideration is given to vegetable, fruit, turf grasses, nursery, and greenhouse production as well as landscaping, herbs, and medicinal plants. Emphasis is placed on Saskatchewan production in relation to regional, national and international markets. Laboratories consist of field trips and hands-on exercises.

Prerequisite(s): AGRC 111.3 and BIOL 120.3.
Note: There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.


PLSC 222.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Introduction to Field Crops

Introduction to field crops from the perspectives of resource availability, management of the crop life cycle and field environment. Prairie crops are used to establish main principles, supplemented with examples from other areas of the world. Laboratories combine trips to local grower and industry sites with exercises on crop morphology and quality.

Prerequisite(s): AGRC 111 or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students can receive credit for only one of PLSC 201.3 or PLSC 222.3. There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.


PLSC 234.3
Weed Control in Organic Agriculture

The principals and practices of weed control in organic agriculture will be covered. Students will learn the application of cultural, mechanical and biological techniques to control weeds within an integrated organic weed control system. Basic weed ecology and weed identification skills will also be learned.

Prerequisite(s): Introductory course in BIOL or permission of the instructor.
Note: This course is only available in web distance format.


PLSC 235.3 — 1/2(3L)
Urban Agriculture

This multi-disciplinary course introduces students to the concept of producing food in an urban setting and takes a more in-depth look at our evolving food system. In addition to learning how to grow fruits and vegetables, students will learn about the nutritional aspects, storage requirements and utilization of crops. Topics including urban livestock, aquaculture, apiculture, rooftop gardening, hobby greenhouse production, and environment modification will be briefly discussed. Students will learn how the urban food production movement has influenced urban design and utilization of land within urban settings. Environmentally friendly practices including water harvesting, composting, organic production, and integrated pest management will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): 30 credit units or permission from the instructor.


PLSC 240.3 — 1(3L)
Plant Metabolism

An introductory plant biochemistry course focusing on photosynthetic and mitochondrial metabolism, with emphasis given to interaction between these processes. The integration of amino acid and lipid biosynthesis, as well as nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, is also examined. This course will be conducted online, with some limited face-to-face instruction.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120, BIOL 222, and one of CHEM 250 or BMSC 200.
Note: Students with credit for BIOC 220 may not take this course for credit.


PLSC 298.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PLSC 311.3 — 2(3L)
General Apiculture

Introduction to the science and practice of beekeeping. Subjects include the development, morphology, physiology genetics and social behaviour of the honey bee, beekeeping equipment, management of bees, swarm control, wintering, honey production, bee diseases and pollination.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 or BIOL 121


PLSC 330.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Ornamental Plants

This course assists students in the identification of ornamental trees, shrubs, perennial, and annual flowers commonly grown in Saskatchewan. Consideration is also given to culture, propagation and use. Labs mostly devoted to “walk-abouts” around campus where samples can be seen and identified.

Note: Offered in even years.


PLSC 333.3 — 1(3L)
Tropical Crops of the World

This course is designed for students interested in learning about the world’s major tropical crops and general tropical agriculture. The course will introduce the major tropical crops, their origin and domestication, the historical significance of the crops, the current production systems and utilization. Students will gain a global perspective on biological, social and economic constraints to the crop production in the tropics. The end of the course will be structured to enable the individual student to focus on the study of a specific crop or production system of their choice.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3
Note: PLSC 211 is strongly recommended.


PLSC 335.3 — 1(3L)
Field Crop Disease Management

The identification and causes of field crop diseases in common crops of western Canada, as well as the abiotic factors that influence disease and crop development are discussed. Included are the principles of plant pathology and integrated disease management, which are the foundations of plant disease control. The course is supplemented with occasional guest lecturers, who have experience in the field of plant pathology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 222 or permission of the instructor


PLSC 340.3 — 2(3L-2P)
Weed Biology and Ecology

Growth, reproduction and spread of weeds, influence of agronomic and edaphic factors on weed community structure, weed-crop competition, and biological and mechanical control of weeds. Concludes with a discussion of the use of combined control methods (biological, mechanical and chemical) in integrated weed management.

Prerequisite(s): AGRC 111 or one of BIOL 202, 222 or 205.


PLSC 345.3 — 2(3L-2P)
Pesticides and Crop Protection

The use of pesticides for crop protection, factors affecting pesticide activity and fate of pesticides in the environment are discussed. Includes the biological activity of soil and foliar applied pesticides, pesticide modes of action and resistance, and dissipation in soil. Registration, environmental legislation and residue tolerance levels in various products are also discussed.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and PLSC 335.
Note: Students with credit for PLSC 50 will not receive credit for this course.


PLSC 350.3 — 1/2(3L)
Agricultural Entomology

The fundamentals of entomology, including basic anatomy and physiology will be examined. Life-cycle and ecology of economically important field crop pest insects found on the Prairies and the principals of economic entomology including monitoring, sampling, insect control and pest management with an IPM emphasis will be explored. The history, current use of insecticides, and innovative and/or novel insect control methods will be investigated. An understanding of the balance between pest and beneficial species (biocontrol) will be developed. Tools used to identify an insect, determine economic damage and control actions will be acquired.

Prerequisite(s): Chem 250 and one of PLSC 201 or PLSC 222
Note: Only available in web format.


PLSC 398.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PLSC 401.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Sustainable Crop Production

Components of sustainable crop production systems will be examined from an ecological perspective. Students will evaluate the sustainability of cropping systems and develop crop production systems with greater ecological and economic sustainability. Laboratories will teach techniques used in crop scouting and diagnostics.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 335, SLSC 312 and successful completion of 75 credit units of university course work.
Note: There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.


PLSC 405.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Genetics of Plant Populations

Application of the principles of Mendelian, population and quantitative genetics to plant evolution and improvement, and conservation of genetic resources. The role of genetic mechanisms in the micro-evolutionary process and their relevance to natural and directed plant evolution and conservation of plant genetic resources is examined.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 226


PLSC 408.3 — 2(3L)
Global Plant Genetic Resources

Students will be provided with basic concepts of the nature, conservation, and utilization of the world's plant genetic resources. Both in situ and ex situ conservation strategies will be covered with emphasis on gene banks. Methods of characterizing and evaluating plant germplasm and its utilization will be emphasized.

Formerly: PLSC 308
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3 and one of BIOL 121.3, 222.3 or EVSC 110.3.
Note: Offered in odd numbered years. Students with credit for PLSC 308 will not receive credit for this course.


PLSC 411.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Plant Breeding

Familiarizes students with the fundamental aspects of plant breeding, including applied plant genetics, breeding objectives and methods, selection theory and practice, and modern genetic techniques. Labs involve hands-on plant breeding activities.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 226 or permission of the instructor.
Note: PLSC 405 is strongly recommended.


PLSC 413.3 — 2(3L-1P)
Advanced Plant Ecology

In-depth examination of recent developments in plant ecology. Current and emerging research interests in plant population, community, and ecosystem ecology will be studied. Use and practical application of analytical tools for synthesis of research results will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least 75 credit units including PLSC 214.3 (Statistical Methods) or STAT 245.3 and one of PLSC 213.3 (Principles of Plant Ecology) or BIOL 228.3 (Introduction to Ecology and Ecosystems), or permission of instructor.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both PLSC 833 and PLSC 413.


PLSC 416.3 — 2(3L-2P)
Applied Plant Biotechnology

Introduces techniques of biotechnology which have the potential to be utilized in plant improvement. The class will cover the following topics: wide hybridization, cytoplasmic male sterility, tissue and cell culture, protoplast fusion and gene transfer technology. The lectures also include molecular markers, linkage and QTL analysis and their application in plant breeding.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 240, BIOL 222 and 226
Note: Offered in even numbered years.


PLSC 417.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Crop Physiology

An outline of interrelationships between physiological activity and crop growth with emphasis on energy conversion and analysis of autotrophic growth in an agrnomic environment. Germination, growth integration, flowering and senescence are also to be considered. Physiological responses to environmental stresses such as water, temperature, salinity, nutrients and disease are related to crop productivity.

Prerequisite(s): One of PLSC 240 or BIOL 331 and successful completion of 84 credit units.


PLSC 418.3 — 2(3L)
Management of Arable Grassland

Will familiarize students with the ecology, quality, physiology and production of temperate forage species used in arable grassland production, focusing on those adapted to a semi-arid climate. The scientific basis of modern management and utilization practices will be examined.

PLSC 420.3 — 1(3L)
Grain Chemistry and Technology

Structure, composition, processing and utilization of the principal starch, oil, and protein crops of the world. The effects of variations in grain and seed characteristics and composition on the quality of the final food, feed and industrial products are emphasized.

PLSC 422.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Rangeland Ecology and Management

Principles of managing rangeland to ensure sustained productivity and multiple-uses. Inventory, evaluation and planning for multiple-use management. Plant morphology and physiology, palatability, energy flow, nutrient cycling and the hydrologic cycle are integrated and discussed in relation to impacts of grazing on the soil-plant-animal system and development of grazing systems.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 228 or PLSC 213
Note: Students with credit for PLSC 322 may not take this course for credit. There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.


PLSC 423.3 — 2(3L-2P)
Landscape Ecology and Vegetation Management

Current theories relating to structure, functioning, and composition of landscapes and human impacts on natural ecosystems, landscape-level processes and patterns, and succession. Developing management plans for natural and remnant landscape elements, and inducing successional changes, and monitoring impacts will be covered.

Prerequisite(s): One of BIOL 228 , GEOG 270 or PLSC 213 or permission of the instructor


PLSC 425.3 — 2(3L-3P)
Forest Ecology

Study of tree physiology, the forest environment, dynamics of the composition, structure and functioning of forest ecosystems at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Emphasis is placed on forest ecosystems of Canada.

Prerequisite(s): One of PLSC 213, BIOL 228 or GEOG 270
Note: Offered in odd numbered years


PLSC 433.3 — 2(3L-2P)
Greenhouse Structures and Crops

Review of greenhouse construction and plant operation. The commercial production, timing, harvesting, diseases and pests of vegetable and floriculture crops are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 220
Note: Offered in odd-numbered years


PLSC 435.3 — 2(2L-2P)
Landscape Design

An introduction to the elements, principles and practices of landscape design. Students will learn how to utilize various design styles, furniture and other materials, structures and plant material to create an attractive and functional landscape. Emphasis will be placed on residential properties. Lectures will mostly be held in the classroom and will involve some guest lecturers who work in the landscaping industry. Labs will involve applying the information presented in lectures.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 220 and 330 or permission of the instructor
Note: Offered in alternate years.


PLSC 441.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Fruit Science

Fundamentals of commercial fruit production including environmental adaptation, breeding, site development, marketing, cultural management, tree fruits, small fruits, tropical fruits, harvesting, diseases and pests.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 220.
Note: Offered in even years.


PLSC 445.3
Experiential Learning in the Workplace

Students apply their academic knowledge while acquiring and expanding transferable skills through work experience. A self-directed learning agreement completed by the student, with input from the employer and approved by the course facilitator, will detail the learning outcomes and how proof of learning will be verified. Reflective journal entries, online discussion, face-to-face interviews, a self- and employer evaluation plus completion of a final product are required. This is an open learning class which takes place from May to December each year, with the majority of work being done over the summer months. Students must first obtain summer employment before registering for the course.

Restriction(s): Open to students enrolled in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 60 credit units at the university-level.


PLSC 451.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Vegetable Science

Principles of production and management of vegetable crops are reviewed with illustrations from contemporary research literature. The content is focused on crops, production situations and limitations encountered in Saskatchewan. Local field trips are planned.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 220.
Note: Offered in odd years.


PLSC 461.3 — 2(3L)
Post Harvest Management of Horticultural Crops

Principles of storage and handling of horticultural crops are reviewed with illustrations from contemporary research literature. Physiological processes underlying management practices are examined.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 220 or permission of the department
Note: Offered in even numbered years


PLSC 470.3 — 2(3L-2P)
Plant Propagation and Nursery Management

The principles and the commercial practices of multiplication of plants by seeds and asexual methods, cultural practices, storage and sale station operation. Local field trips are planned.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 220 or BIOL 222
Note: Offered in even numbered years


PLSC 492.3 — 1&2
Literature Thesis in Plant Sciences

Students will investigate a problem or issue in Plant Sciences and present their findings as a written thesis and as a seminar. Technical writing and thesis preparation skills will be addressed in a series of lectures at the beginning of term 1.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 81 credit units of university level courses.


PLSC 494.6 — 1&2
Research Thesis in Plant Sciences

Provides students with an opportunity to conduct original research in plant sciences in association with a research supervisor. Students will be given guidance on hypothesis development, experimental design, research, analysis and presentation. Students will present their results in a written thesis and in a conference format.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of 81 credit units toward the B.S.A. Plant Sciences major and a cumulative average of at least 70%.


PLSC 498
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PLSC 803.3 — 1(3L-2T)
Advanced Plant Breeding

Deals with important theoretical and applied issues related to crop improvement in both self-pollinated and cross-pollinated species. Theoretical aspects of artificial selection, genetic variability and population structure will be considered along with the practical implications of field testing, cultivar increase and release, and plant breeding regulations.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 411 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.


PLSC 804.3 — 2(2L-4P)
Processing and Analysis of Grain Crops

Grain and oilseed processing technologies and end-uses will be reviewed, as will the characteristics of grains and oilseeds which influence quality, utility and value. Laboratories will provide hands-on experience with current procedures for predicting grain quality.

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 220.


PLSC 812.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Physiological Plant Ecology

A study of the physiological basis for the interaction of the individual species with its environment. Included are discussions of the energy environment of the plant and how temperature, light, water status, soil conditions etc., affect plant function and distribution.

Prerequisite(s): Courses in plant ecology and plant physiology, or permission of the instructor.


PLSC 813.3 — 2(3L)
Statistical Methods in Life Sciences

Some parametric statistical methods commonly used in agriculture and experimental biology. Introduction to factorial experiments and analysis of covariance. Emphasizes the principles and procedures of experimental designs.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 214.


PLSC 814.3 — 1(3L)
Physiology and Yield Formation

Physiological processes involved in plant growth and development, with emphasis on yield formation in crops. Topics include growth stage systems, germination, phenology, seed set and seed growth, yield components, senescence and yield management.

PLSC 815.3 — 1(3L-3P)
Applied Plant Cytogenetics

The application of cytogenetics to plant breeding. Topics include chromosomal aberrations, crop evolution, interspecific hybridization, gene transfer, euploidy and aneuploidy.

PLSC 816.3 — 1(3L)
Quantitative Genetics

The genetical and statistical concepts of quantitative variation in crop plants. Emphasis will be on factors which affect direct and correlated response to artificial selection. Methods of quantitative genetic research will be considered.

PLSC 822.3 — 1(3L-2T)
Ecology and Management of Rangeland Resources

Emphasizes the principles of managing rangeland to ensure sustained productivity. Plant morphology, physiology, palatability, nutritional value, energy flow, and nutrient cycling are integrated and emphasized in relation to the impacts of grazing on soil-plant-animal interactions. Inventory, evaluation, and manipulation of rangeland resources are also studied. Field trips are required.

Permission of instructor required.


PLSC 823.3 — 2(3L-2P)
Landscape Ecology and Vegetation Management

Current theories relating to structure, functioning and composition of landscapes and human impacts on natural ecosystems, landscape-level processes and patterns, and succession. Developing management plans for natural and remnant landscape elements, and inducing successional changes, and monitoring impacts will be covered.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 253, GEOG 270, PLSC 213 or permission of the instructor.


PLSC 825.3 — 2(3L-6P)
Applied Plant Biotechnology

Examines the application of tissue culture to plant and plant product development, the principles of plant gentic engineering, the development of molecular markers and associated technologies, application of genomic technologies to plant breeding, and the regulatory and social issues associated with plant biotechnology. The laboratory allows students hands-on experience with different techniques in plant biotechnology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 226 and PLSC 240 or any 200-level BIOC, or permission of instructor or department.


PLSC 827.3 — 2(3L)
Molecular Basis of Grain Quality

The physical and compositional qualities of cereal grains determine how they are processed and utilized. This course will present the biochemical and genetic basis of grain quality and the molecular strategies available to improve the quality characteristics of major grain crops.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 416 or permission of the instructor.


PLSC 833.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Plant Ecology

An in-depth examination of recent developments in plant ecology. Current and emerging research interest in plant population, community, and ecosystem ecology will be studied. Use and practical application of analytical tools for synthesis of research results will be emphasized.

Restriction(s): This course is restricted to students enrolled in the College of Graduate Studies and Research.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both PLSC 833 and PLSC 413.


PLSC 841.3 — 2(3L-2P)
Advanced Fruit Growing

Fundamentals of commercial fruit production including environmental adaptation, breeding, site development, marketing, cultural management, tree fruits, small fruits, tropical fruits, harvesting, diseases and pests.

Note: Students with credit for PLSC 441 may not take this course for credit.


PLSC 865.3 — 2(3L-1S)
Plant Abiotic Stress

Students will be introduced to current concepts and recent advances in plant resistance mechanisms to freezing, moisture, salt and heat stress from the ecologic to molecular levels. Methods of stress application and viability testing will also be demonstrated. At the end of each stress section, guest scientists will be invited to present their research.

PLSC 880.3 — 1/2(2L-2S)
Introduction to Plant Disease Epidemiology

Principles and quantitative methods of plant disease epidemiology are presented. The role of host plants, the environment and the pathogen in the development of epidemics are discussed. The design of experiments, analysis of data generated from such experiments, as well as temporal and spatial development of disease are addressed. Disease forecasting and decision support systems are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): PLSC 813 or permission of the department


PLSC 881.3 — 1/2(2L-2S)
Host-pathogen Interactions and Breeding for Disease Resistance in Plants

Will provide students with an understanding of host-pathogen interactions in plants and with the genetic basis of breeding for disease resistance. Recent concepts in host-pathogen genetics and trends in disease resistance breeding will be considered.

Prerequisite(s): Introductory plant pathology and plant breeding courses or permission of the instructor.


PLSC 898.3 — 1/2(1L-3P)
Special Topics

Assigned reading and tutorials in a specific field related to the student's major interest. Students will be required to prepare reviews or seminars on specific topics.

PLSC 899.6
Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

PLSC 990
Seminar

Reviews of literature and recent investigations. Graduate students are required to attend and present papers during the period of their candidacy.

PLSC 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

PLSC 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course