This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

PSY GR

PSY 120.3 — 1/2(3L)
Biological and Cognitive Bases of Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major biological and cognitive areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, memory, learning, language, and motivation and emotion.

Note: Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.


PSY 121.3 — 1/2(3L)
Social Clinical Cultural and Developmental Bases of Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major social, clinical, cultural and developmental areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of intelligence, development, personality, social and cultural psychology, psychological disorders, treatment, and health, stress, and coping.

Note: Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.


PSY 207.3 — (3L)
Psychology of Death and Dying

Focuses on the psychological issues relevant to death and dying. Topics to be examined: societal attitudes, cultural differences, coping with dying, dealing with loss and grief, memorialization and funerals, developmental issues across the life span, relevant legal issues, suicide and life threating behaviour, AIDS and the psychological meaning of death.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 213.3 — 1/2(3L)
Child Development

An examination of the social, emotional, moral, cognitive and physical development of typical children from conception to late childhood. Individual development is considered from a psychological perspective within the contexts of family and culture.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 214.3 — 1/2(3L)
Adolescent Development

An introduction to theories and research methods in adolescent development. Attention is given to normative development in physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains. Students will obtain an understanding of factors that influence normative trajectories and processes; basic theory underlying adolescent research; and strengths and weaknesses of methods in this area.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 216.3 — 1/2(3L)
Psychology of Aging

The study of normal psychological development through maturity to old age. Topics include: consideration of critical issues of research methods; problems of adjustment of the aged such as physical decline, retirement, aloneness, disengagement; the needs and care of the aged, antecedents of successful aging; the psychology of dying and death; theories of aging.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 222.3 — 1/2(3L)
Personality

A review of major theories, both historical and contemporary, in the study of personality. Psychoanalytic, social learning, existential-humanistic, and trait perspectives will be covered, along with a discussion of their strengths and limitations.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 223.3 — 1/2(3L)
Abnormal Psychology

Major patterns of abnormal behaviour are reviewed and studied with respect to origins, course and treatment. The focus is upon understanding abnormal behaviour with an integrated knowledge of basic principles of general psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.
Note: PSY 222 recommended.


PSY 224.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Culture and Psychology

A survey of theory and research on cultural issues in psychology, including developmental, cognitive and social psychology. By the end of the course, the student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental concepts and theoretical perspectives pertinent to the study of culture and human behaviour, knowledge of the findings of relevant classic and contemporary empirical studies, and familiarity with methodological issues pertaining to research in this area.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 225.3 — 1/2(3L)
Group Dynamics and Intergroup Relations

Designed to give the student a broad overview of an important area of social psychology. Group dynamics and inter-group relations will be covered through lectures, readings, and assignments on topics such as group decision-making, leadership, conflict and cooperation, collective behaviour, prejudice, and minority-majority relations.

Formerly: PSY 221
Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.
Note: Students with credit for PSY 221 cannot take PSY 225 for credit.


PSY 226.3 — 1/2(3L)
Individual Processes in Social Psychology

An examination of social psychological theories and research related to individual processes. Intrapersonal processes such as social cognition, the self, and attitudes, as well as interpersonal processes such as attraction, persuasion, altruism and aggression will be covered through lectures, readings, and assignments.

Formerly: PSY 221.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 227.3 — 3L
Human Sexuality

Examines topics that fall under the rubric of human sexuality (e.g., sexual diversity, prostitution, and pornography). Through interdisciplinary readings and films, this course details how socio-cultural forces may shape individuals' experiences as sexual beings and their interpretations of various sexual practices.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121 or permission of the instructor.


PSY 230.3 — 1/2(3L)
Criminal Behaviour

The application of psychological theories to the understanding of criminal behaviour. An overview of assessment and treatment issues as these apply to specific types of criminals (e.g., sexual offenders, psychopathic offenders) will also be provided.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.
Note: PSY 222 or 223 or 257 is recommended.


PSY 231.3 — 1/2(3L)
Psychology and Law

Examines the role psychology plays in promoting justice within the legal system. Theory, research, and methodology related to the psychology of evidence are reviewed. The focus is on the role psychologists play in obtaining and assessing witness evidence during the pre-trial and trial phases of the legal process.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 233.3 — 1(3L-1P)
Statistical Methods in Behavioural Sciences

The role of statistics in research including: statistical concepts and models, estimation, simple tests of significance, linear regression and correlation, and introduction to analysis of variance. The laboratory component will consist of training in the utilization of statistical software.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120 or PSY 121.
Note: Refer to Statistics Course Regulations in the Arts & Science section of the Calendar if intending to use for Arts & Science credit.


PSY 234.3 — 2(3L-1P)
Statistical Methods in Behavioural Sciences

A continuation of the role of statistics in research covering methods of analysis of variance including cross-classification, introduction to multiple comparisons, factorials, multiple regression and covariance. The laboratory component will consist of training in the utilization of statistical software.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 233.
Note: Four-year and Honours students should take PSY 235 concurrently. Refer to Statistics Course Regulations in the Arts & Science section of the Calendar if intending to use for Arts & Science credit.


PSY 235.3 — 2(3L-1P)
Research Methods and Design

Introduces students to both experimental and non-experimental research methods and designs used in psychology. The course focuses on the interplay between research questions, theory, the selection of appropriate research procedures and resulting conclusions. The laboratory component will consist of practical training and application of the concepts discussed in class.

Formerly: PSY 372.6
Prerequisite(s): PSY 233
Note: Four-year and Honours students should take PSY 234 concurrently. Students with credit for PSY 232 or 372 cannot take this course for credit.


PSY 236.3 — 1/2(3L)
Qualitative Research in Psychology

This course introduces students to key concepts from the philosophy of science and from research design (e.g., ontology, epistemology, methodology, method) and provides a broad overview of contemporary approaches to qualitative inquiry in the discipline of psychology. Students will be introduced to ways of formulating research questions that are suitable for qualitative inquiry; methods for generating qualitative data (e.g., interviews, observations, online, visual); and ways of analyzing qualitative data from different methodological traditions (e.g., grounded theory, discourse analysis, narrative analysis).

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120 or PSY 121.


PSY 242.3 — 1/2(3L)
Physiological Psychology

An introduction to the language, techniques, concepts and general subject matter of physiological psychology. Topics will include: sensory processes, motor systems, the brain, memory and learning. This core knowledge will be useful to those wanting an exposure to the biological study of behaviour, or to those wanting a primer for more advanced study.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120.


PSY 243.3 — 1/2(3L)
Evolutionary Psychology

The human mind and the behaviour that emerges as products of the mind, will be considered as the outcome of a large number of adaptations brought about by natural selection. The possibility of, and evidence for, a universal human nature at the level of evolved psychological mechanisms will be presented. The evolutionary significance of altruism, cooperation and conflict, morality, deceit, self-deception and illness will be examined.

Formerly: PSY 244.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 120 and PSY 121.
Note: Students with credit for PSY 244 cannot take this course for credit.


PSY 246.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Human Neuropsychology

An introduction to research and theory on the topic of human brain function. Topics include research techniques and strategies, developmental neuropsychology, localization and lateralization of function, recovery of function, and deficits associated with lesions of the neocortex.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120.


PSY 252.3 — 1/2(3L)
Perceptual Processes

A brief survey of the principles that have emerged from the empirical investigation of perception, with special reference to vision and hearing. An examination of the factors which underlie such fundamental features of behaviour as the perception of objects and of three-dimensional space and the maintenance of perceptual constancy.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120.


PSY 253.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

An introduction to research and theory on the topic of human cognitive functioning. The course will explore how humans attend to, encode and remember their experiences, communicate using both written and spoken language, and engage in higher order processes such as reasoning, problem solving, and decision making.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120.


PSY 255.3 — 1/2(3L)
Human Memory

An introduction to research and theory on the structures and processes involved in human memory. Topics include the evidence for distinct sensory, short-term, and long-term memory stores, the format of representation in memory, and the determinants of effective memory performance.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120.


PSY 256.3 — 1/2(3L)
Psychology of Language

Explores and evaluates theories and research involving the psychology of language. Broadly defined, the topics will include visual and auditory language issues regarding: encoding, representation, comprehension, production, acquisition, biological foundations, dysfunction, and cultural influences. Students will also learn about current research projects, and the preparation of research papers.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120.


PSY 257.3 — 1/2(3L)
Clinical and Counselling Psychology

Review of the relevant topics in clinical and counselling psychology including psycho diagnostic testing, and the major approaches to therapeutic change.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.
Note: Students with credit for PSY 357 may not take this course for credit.


PSY 260.3 — 1/2(3L)
Health Psychology

Focuses on psychological theories and research related to the development, prevention and treatment of illness. Topics covered will include the effects of stress on health, coping with pain, the physician-patient relationship, patient non-compliance, and a variety of risky health behaviours such as substance abuse.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.
Note: Students who have taken PSY 360 may not take this course for credit.


PSY 261.3 — 1/2(3L)
Community Psychology

Introduces psychological theories and research on the effects of the physical and social environments on human behaviour and on the design and evaluation of changes which might promote adaptive behaviour.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.
Note: Students who have taken PSY 360 may not take this course for credit.


PSY 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PSY 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PSY 315.3 — 1(1.5L-1.5P)
Advanced Development I Social and Emotional

Introduces students to the theoretical foundations, research designs, and methods used to study social and emotional development. The course will involve lectures and a lab component. In the lab component, students will participate in a collaborative research project.

Formerly: PSY 314
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units of 200-level Psychology including PSY 233, and (PSY 235 or HLST 210), and one of PSY 213, 214, OR 216.


PSY 316.3 — 2(3P)
Advanced Development II Social and Emotional Research

Students will develop independent research projects designed to answer an empirical question in the domain of social and emotional development. Each student will be responsible (either individually or as a member of a small group) for designing a study, testing participants, analyzing data, and writing up a research report.

Formerly: PSY 314.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 234 and 315.


PSY 317.3 — 1(1.5L-1.5P)
Cognitive Development I

Introduces students to an in-depth study of major content areas, theoretical orientations, and research methods which are necessary to advance knowledge in the study of cognitive development. Students will learn about the special features of the cognitive developmental perspective and will conduct research projects in the laboratory component of the course.

Formerly: PSY 314.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units of 200-level Psychology including PSY 233, and (PSY 235 or HLST 210), and one of PSY 213, 214, OR 216.


PSY 318.3 — 2(3P)
Cognitive Development II Research

Students will develop independent research projects designed to answer an empirical question in the domain of cognitive development. Each student will be responsible (either individually or as a member of a small group) for designing a study, testing participants, analyzing data, and writing up a research report.

Formerly: PSY 314.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 234 and 317.


PSY 323.3 — 1(1.5L-1.5P)
Qualitative Study of Lives and Social Practices

Qualitative approaches to understanding lives and social practices will be introduced. Topics include: an overview of non-positivist epistemologies and methodologies and an introduction to methods such as narrative analysis, grounded theory, ethnography and discourse analysis.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 233; and (PSY 235 or HLST 210); and 3 credit units from Group 1; and an additional 9 credit units of 200-level Psychology.


PSY 324.3 — 2(3P)
Research in Qualitative Study of Lives and Social Practices

A research course linked to Qualitative Study of Lives and Social Practices (PSY 323). Students participate in the design, data collection, analysis and write up of one group research project. A variety of data gathering approaches (e.g. archival searches, interviewing, observational field work) and methods of analysis (e.g. thematic analysis, narrative analysis, grounded theory, ethnography, discourses analysis) are used.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 234 and 323.


PSY 325.3 — 1(1.5L-1.5P)
Research Methods in Social Psychology

Students will be introduced to the variety of research methods used in social psychology through one or more content areas determined by the instructor (e.g., prejudice, discrimination, attitude change, interpersonal conflict, impression management, aggression, media violence, prosocial behaviour, conformity, group processes, attraction, applying social psychology to the law, workplace, health problems, etc.).

Formerly: PSY 321.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units of 200-level psychology, including PSY 233, and (PSY 235 or HLST 210), and one of PSY 225 or 226.


PSY 326.3 — 2(3P)
Observation, Interview and Questionnaire Methods in Social Psychological Research

Students will research social interactions using observation, interview and/or questionnaire methods. Within a full-semester research project (conducted individually or in small groups), students will choose a research question, review the relevant literature, obtain ethical approval, design and conduct the study, analyze data and write a research report.

Formerly: PSY 321.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 234 and 325.


PSY 328.3 — 2(3P)
The Experimental Method in Social Psychological Research: An Independent Project

Provides an opportunity to research social psychological phenomena using the experimental method. Within a full-semester research project (conducted individually or in small groups), students will choose a research question, review the relevant literature, obtain ethical approval, design and conduct the study, analyze data and write a research report

Formerly: PSY 321.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 234 and 325.


PSY 343.3 — 1(1.5L-1.5P)
Laboratory in Behavioural Neuroscience

An introduction to the techniques, theory and methods in behavioural neuroscience. The focus will be upon brain and behaviour and the techniques used to study nervous system function. The lab and seminar components will include a series of experiments to be carried out by the students.

Formerly: PSY 342.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units of 200-level psychology, including PSY 233, and (PSY 235 or HLST 210), and one of PSY 242 or 246.


PSY 344.3 — 2(3P)
Research in Behavioural Neuroscience

A laboratory course in behavioural neuroscience. The course will provide students with the opportunity to conceptualize, design, and implement an independent research project in the area of behavioural neuroscience. Emphasis will be placed on brain and behaviour and the techniques used to study nervous system function.

Formerly: PSY 342.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 233, 234, 235, and 343.


PSY 347.3 — 1(1.5L-1.5P)
Advanced Human Neuropsychology

Introduces the student to the theoretical and methodological issues in the study of the structure and function of the human neocortex. The course will involve lectures, seminars, and a lab component in which a series of experiments will be carried out by the students.

Formerly: PSY 346.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units of 200-level psychology, including PSY 233, and (PSY 235 or HLST 210), and one of PSY 242 or 246.


PSY 348.3 — 2(3P)
Research in Human Neuropsychology

A laboratory course concerned with the concepts, theories, and experimental investigation of the structures and functions of the human neocortex. The course will provide the students with the opportunity to conceptualize, design, and implement an independent research project to answer an empirical question related to experimental neuropsychology.

Formerly: PSY 346
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 234 and 347.


PSY 355.3 — 1(1.5L-1.5P)
Research in Advanced Cognitive Science

This lecture and laboratory course exposes students to current theory and research methods in cognitive science. Students will be expected to review, design, conduct, analyze and report a series of class experiments. Topics may include perception, attention, memory, thinking, reasoning and problem solving.

Formerly: PSY 352.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units of 200-level psychology, including PSY 233, and (PSY 235 or HLST 210), and one of PSY 252, 253, 255, or 256.


PSY 356.3 — 2(3P)
Advanced Cognitive Science III Independent Research Projects

In this laboratory course students develop independent experimental research projects in some area of cognitive science. Each student (either individually or as a member of a small group) is responsible for designing a study, testing participants, analysing the data, and writing up a research report following American Psychological Association style conventions.

Formerly: PSY 352.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 233, 234, 235, and one of PSY 353 or 355.


PSY 379.3
Washington Center Topics in Psychology

Covers topics in Psychology, offered by the Washington Center, Washington D.C. Possible topics include The Rationality and Psychology of Conflict, Violence, and War, Citizenship in a Multicultural Society, Forensic Psychology or other topics approved by the Department of Psychology.

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units of university level study including 6 credit units senior PSY.
Note: Registration in this course is restricted to students selected for the Washington Center Term Abroad program.


PSY 380.3 — 1/2(1L-2S)
Culture and the Therapeutic Process

Exposes the student to critical scholarly perspectives on the role of culture in understanding the form, content and efficacy of various forms of therapy found in the global community. The course explores both mainstream as well as “traditional,” alternative and complimentary approaches.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 120 and PSY 121 and 12 credit units at the 200-level in Psychology, Native Studies, Anthropology or Sociology.


PSY 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PSY 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PSY 418.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Developmental Psychology

An advanced seminar focussed on theoretical and empirical analyses of human development. A set of original research articles covering diverse areas of developmental psychology (e.g., behavioural genetics, development and psychopathology, cognitive development, social development, aging) will be assigned, read, and discussed by the class.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units from PSY 213, 214, 216, 315, 317.


PSY 423.3 — 1/2(3S)
Disability Discourses and Social Practices

The goals of this Seminar course are two-fold: first, to provide knowledge about the interconnections between disability, discourses and social practices; second to provide students with the opportunity to pursue an issue of interest to them and to share their discoveries, thoughts and questions regarding this issue with their classmates. The course invites students to examine how cultural interpretations interact with biology or psychophysiology and social interactions to produce distinctive forms of disability.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 300-level Psychology.
Note: Students who took PSY 498.3 Disability, Discourses and Social Practices may not take this course for credit. The course endorses a multidisciplinary perspective. Materials from the fields of disability studies, anthropology, psychology, history, philosophy, psychiatry, literature, law and ethics are examined to provide an interdisciplinary perspective on disability.


PSY 425.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Group Dynamics and Intergroup Relations

Designed to give the student an in-depth knowledge of the social psychology of group dynamics and intergroup relations. Therefore, the course covers both the major theories and research in this area. Students will study important contemporary primary source articles. They will also give in-class presentations on selected topic areas. The course is designed to allow students to study this topic at an advanced level.

Formerly: PSY 420.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 225 and one of PSY 226, 323, or 325.


PSY 426.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Processes

This advanced seminar examines social psychological phenomena internal to the individual, such as social cognition, motivation, emotion, the self, and attitudes and attitude change. It also considers issues associated with relations between individuals such as altruism, aggression, affiliation and social influence processes.

Formerly: PSY 420.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 226 and one of 225, 323 or 325.


PSY 448.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Neuroscience

Using a seminar format, this course will survey selected topics in neuroscience. The topics covered may include neuropsychopharmacology, the neural bases of: memory, language, emotion, attention, consciousness, plasticity phenomena, spatial abilities; or other topics of interest to the faculty and students.

Formerly: PSY 440.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units from PSY 242, 243, 246, 343, 347.


PSY 456.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Cognitive Science

An advanced seminar focussed on theoretical and experimental analyses of human perception, cognition, and performance. A set of original research articles covering diverse areas of cognitive science (e.g., basic perception, memory, language comprehension, human reasoning) will be assigned, read, and discussed by the class.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units from PSY 252, 253, 255, 256, 353, 355.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different


PSY 472.6 — 1&2(1L-2P)
BA Honours Thesis

Students will carry out a major project under the supervision of a faculty member, and report the project in the form of an honours thesis. The project will usually involve empirical research.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled in the Honours program or have written permission of the department; and at least one 3 credit unit 300-level PSY A and one 3 credit unit 300-level PSY B course.


PSY 473.6 — 1/2(1L-2P)
BSc Honours Thesis

Students will complete an honours thesis research project with a faculty member, on a topic that falls clearly within Natural Science (see Calendar under Psychology for a complete listing of the courses and areas of Psychology that are in Group 2: Natural Science).

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled in the Honours program or have written permission of the department and at least one 3 credit unit 300-level PSY A and one 3 credit unit 300-level PSY B course.


PSY 480.3 — 1/2(3S)
Aboriginal Mental Health and Illness

The goals of this seminar course are twofold: first, to provide detailed knowledge about contemporary Aboriginal mental health issues; second, to develop a critical perspective on the theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to research in Aboriginal mental health. Material from the fields of psychology, psychiatry and anthropology will be in integrated to provide an interdisciplinary perspective. Examples will be drawn from both the United States and Canada.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in a 300-level Psychology, Anthropology, Native Studies or Sociology.


PSY 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PSY 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

PSY 801.3 — 1/2(3S)
Culture Mental Health and Illness

This advanced seminar examines the role of culture in understanding mental health and illness. Adopting a critical perspective, the course explores the meaning of culture, how disorders are constructed within the culture of biomedicine, how mental health and illness are configured cross-culturally, and how issues of culture are handled in research and treatment.

PSY 803.3 — 1/2(3S)
CultureHealth and Human Development

Explores concepts of human development, its cultural variations, and some of the basic and often unacknowledged assumptions that underlie these concepts and variations. Various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of human development will be examined.

Permission of instructor required.
Formerly: Part of PSY 882
Prerequisite(s): Registration in the College of Graduate Studies and Research.
Note: Students with credit for PSY 882.6 cannot take this course for credit.


PSY 805.3 — 1/2(3L)
Statistics I Univariate General Linear Models

A theoretical and practical examination of univariate statistical analyses. Topics will include: a review of basic concepts, hypothesis tests on means, power, correlation and regression (simple and multiple), ANOVA (simple, factorial, and repeated measures), multiple comparisons, ANCOVA, overview of general linear models, and chi-square tests. Through several computer assignments, students will develop the necessary experience to be competent at conducting and interpreting univariate statistical analyses.

PSY 807.3 — 1/2(3L)
Statistics III Multivariate Statistics

The course objective is for graduate students to gain some knowledge of and experience with using multivariate statistics that are frequently used by psychologists dealing with non-experimental or quasi-experimental data. The course will cover multiple regression, factor analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and structural equation modeling.

PSY 809.3 — (3S)
Qualitative Research

This course is designed to introduce students to ways of doing research that are based in a constructionist epistemology and that focus on the generation and analysis of qualitative data. Coverage of specific methodologies (e.g., narrative research, grounded theory, discourse analysis) will be grounded in an understanding of their philosophical foundations.

Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate degree.


PSY 810.3 — 1/2(3S)
Methods of Applied Social Research

An advanced coverage of survey development (including question, wording, and format), research interview techniques, and psychometric properties of multi-item scales. The focus will be on methods typically used in social science research.

PSY 811.3 — 1/2(3S)
Program Evaluation

An intensive analysis of the processes of developing and evaluating human service programs. Major topics will include the articulation of program goals, the development of measures, evaluation designs, and statistical techniques.

PSY 812.6
Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Psychology

Covers major historical and philosophical developments in psychological theory and research throughout the ages, including ontological and epistemological positions and their links to contemporary ideas in psychology. Philosophical aspects of psychological research are addressed from a historical perspective including an examination of the paradigms of positivism, interpretivism, and realism.

Note: Students with credit for PSY 822 will not receive credit for this course.


PSY 813.3 — 1&2(2L-2S-3P)
Psychological Assessment I

This is a foundational course in the theoretical and practical issues in personality and ability assessment. The nature, history, and current controversies and problems related to objective personality and intellectual assessment are examined. A goal of this course is to become proficient in basic interviewing skills and in the administration and interpretation of basic objective personality and cognitive ability instruments.

Permission of the Director of Clinical Training is required.
Note: Students with credit for PSY 815.6 will not receive credit for this course.


PSY 814.3
Psychological Assessment II

A basic course in techniques of intelligence and cognitive ability assessment across the lifespan, including intelligence test administration and interpretation, other measures of cognitive ability, report writing, and case formulation.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 813.3
Note: Students with credit for PSY 815.6 will not receive credit for this course.


PSY 830.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Personality

This course will provide a survey of the major theories of personality. Several theories will be introduced and a critical evaluation of each perspective will be encouraged. The course will address questions such as: What is personality? What are the similarities and differences among different theories? What historical and cultural factors influence the development of different theories? What are the implications and uses of different personality theories? The research methods used to understand each of these theories will also be explored.

PSY 831.3 — 1/2(3S)
Psychopathology and Individual Differences I

An intensive study of current theory and research in the field of behavioral pathology designed to provide broad-based exposure to current issues, and to developmental and historical topics. Behavioral disorder in children and adults, including older adults, will be covered in this seminar.

PSY 832.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Social Psychology

This course offers fundamental training in Social Psychology. Across a broad number of topics, students will be introduced to current theories, methodology, and research and will engage in critical review, analysis, and discussion of historical and contemporary issues within the discipline.

PSY 837.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Human Memory

Examines current issues in the field of human learning and memory. These will include 1) the cognitive architecture of human memory systems, 2) how information is represented and organized in memory, and 3) the role of consciousness in the storage, retrieval, and processing of information.

PSY 838.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Language Processing

Critical presentation and discussion of recent research and theory on the psychology of language, from a cognitive and neuroscience perspective. Topics may include normal and impaired word recognition, speech perception, reading, language acquisition, and localization of function (e.g., fMRI). Different modeling perspectives on these topics will also be discussed.

PSY 839.3 — 1/2(3S)
Thinking and Reasoning

Deals with cognitive approaches to issues of human rationality. We will address questions such as: When is a decision judged to be rational/ irrational? How do we interpret evidence to suggest that reasoners frequently fail to make normatively appropriate decisions? How is our decision-making ability limited by our cognitive resources?

PSY 841.3 — 1/2(3S)
Psychopathology and Individual Differences II

This course is an intensive seminar focused on complex psychopathology and individual differences. It builds upon PSY831 by including selected topics in psychological assessment of these areas. Topics may also include neuropsychological assessment, forensic assessment, personality assessment, and the intersection of physical illness.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 831
Note: Students with credit for PSY 816 will not receive credit for this course.


PSY 845.3 — (3S)
Clinical Supervision and Consultation

A course in the provision of clinical supervision and consultation including theoretical frameworks of supervision, resolution of issues and dilemmas commonly encountered in supervision, administration, provision of feedback, diversity, the interpersonal context of supervision, and core skills and techniques of supervision and consultation.



PSY 846.3 — 1/2(1L-2S)
Advanced Seminar in Human Neuropsychology

A critical review of theory, research and methodology in human neuropsychology. Using a combination of lectures and seminars, students will be exposed to the recent literature on topics such as brain localization and lateralization of functions, brain damage and recovery, and the neuropsychology of "higher-order" functions.

PSY 850.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in Psychological Therapy I

Principles and procedures of individual psychological therapy and counselling. One or two specific systems of psychotherapy are studied. Historical development and empirical supports are examined.

PSY 852.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in Psychological Therapy II

An intensive study of principles and procedures of individual psychological therapy and counselling. One or two specific systems of psychotherapy are studied.

PSY 858.3 — 1/2(1.5S)
Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology

Introduction to ethical principles, codes, and processes for ethical decision-making with a special focus on clinical psychology. Readings and discussion on confidentiality, informed consent, dual relationships, duties to clients, business practices, and other professional issues. Equips students to resolve ethical dilemmas in practice and in licensure examinations.

PSY 860.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Professional Skills

The seminar is designed to develop professional competence in clinical psychology through the study and discussion of professional issues and problems in clinical and community practice. Both theoretical and practical issues will be considered, including topics such as forensic assessment and awareness of cultural factors in healing. Required for all PhD students in clinical psychology.

PSY 862.3 — 1/2(3S)
Foundations of Applied Social Psychology

The major objective of this course is to explore how social psychological theory and research inform the analysis of social issues and social problems. Predominant social psychological theories and the current state of the research pertaining to these theories will be discussed and evaluated in terms of their relevance to applied research and social issues.

PSY 864.3 — (3S)
Theory and Applied Issues in Social Psychology

This course will introduce students to specialized research areas in social psychology, with a focus on relevant theory and the application of research. A number of social psychological topics will be discussed, along with their applications to a broad range of social issues and interventions.

PSY 865.3 — (3S)
Applied Research Designs

This course is an advanced seminar in applied research design from a post-positivist critical multiplism perspective. Students will examine the validity and the applicability of randomized experimental designs, quasi-experimental designs, and single case and time series designs. The use of qualitative methods to complement and enrich quantitative methods will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 805; PSY 807.


PSY 873.3 — 1&2(1.5P)
Cognition and Neuroscience Research

Ph.D. students enrolled in the Cognition and Neuroscience training stream in the Department of Psychology develop a research project under the supervision of a faculty member other than the Ph.D. supervisor. The purpose is to acquire research experience with theory, methodology and data analysis in an area of cognition or neuroscience distinct from the dissertation research.

PSY 898.3 — 1/2/1&2(R)
Special Topics

The student pursues a program of readings in selected research topics under the supervision of individual faculty members.

PSY 899
Special Topics

The student pursues a program of readings in selected research topics under the supervision of individual faculty members.

PSY 900
Directed Research in Psychology

Under the supervision of faculty members, students will be involved in one or a combination of research seminars, group, or individualized research projects.

PSY 901.0 — 1&2(8 hours)(26 weeks)
Individual Research

This course consists of completing a supervised research project in a topic area distinct from the student’s PhD dissertation research. Each student will be under the direct supervision of an individual faculty member. The student and faculty supervisor will meet weekly to discuss activities and progress. It is expected that the student will conceive of original research within the scope of the research activities being conducted within the faculty supervisor’s lab and that the student will take the lead on the specified project. It is expected that any research outputs (published manuscripts, conference presentations, etc.) will be jointly authored by the student (senior author) and the faculty supervisor (junior author).

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to Ph.D. students in the Applied Social Psychology concentration.


PSY 902 — 1&2(3P-2C)
Practicum in Professional Psychology

Consists of supervised field work in professional psychology under the direction of licensed clinical psychologists or individual faculty members.

Note: Taken in conjunction with other courses in the clinical and applied social programs.


PSY 903
Clerkship or Internship in Professional Psychology

The student is engaged for one term as an intern in a clinical, community, or organizational setting. Supervision is provided by departmental faculty members and psychologists in field settings.

Note: Taken in conjunction with other courses in the clinical and applied social programs.


PSY 904 — 1&2&3(31C)
Internship in Clinical Psychology

After completing four years of course based and practicum training, clinical psychology graduate students complete a full-time, one year internship in a health setting accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association. Supervision is provided by clinical psychologists affiliated with the internship setting.

PSY 994
Research

Completion of original research and writing of Master's thesis.

PSY 996
Research

Completion of original research and writing of Ph.D. dissertation.