This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2016 to April 2017.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2016-2017, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

SOC GR

SOC 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
Foundations in Sociology Society Structure Process

One part of a two-part introduction to the discipline of sociology, the study of society. It examines theories and methods for studying changes to the nature and organization of society from pre-modern, to modern and post-modern. Students will be introduced to core sociological concepts used to understand social inequality, social order, social change, and globalization.

Formerly: Part of SOC 110.6.
Note: Students who have taken SOC 110.6 may not take this course for credit.


SOC 112.3 — 1/2(3L)
Foundations in Sociology Social Construction of Everyday Life

One part of a two-part introduction to the discipline of sociology, the study of society. It examines how we come to understand and experience ourselves and the world around us and how we create culture. Students will be introduced to the study of culture, socialization, social interaction, identity formation and self-fashioning, the social construction of class, gender and race, age, deviance, and other social phenomena.

Formerly: Part of SOC 110.6.
Note: Students who have taken SOC 110.6 may not take this course credit.


SOC 203.3 — 1/2(3L)
Race and Ethnic Relations in Canada

An introduction to and general overview of the various theoretical perspectives on race and ethnic relations and ethnicity. Addresses such issues as assimilation, racism, ethnic persistence, multiculturalism, and domination.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 204.3 — 1/2(3L)
Rural Sociology

Analysis of social change in rural areas with emphasis on links between the organization of resource-based industries and the social characteristics of rural communities. The focus is on contemporary rural development experiences in North America with comparison to selected additional international cases.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 205.3 — 1/2(3L)
Comparative Race and Ethnic Relations

A comparative sociological analysis of ethnic relations will include discussion of ethnic stratification, separatism, pluralism, and politicization of ethnic minorities in selected societies.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 206.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Communities and Community Development

Sociological perspectives on community as social ideal and human experience, the formation and characteristics of contemporary communities, community organizations and community development in theory and practice.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 210.3 — 1/2(3L)
Families Social Structure and Social Change

This course examines diverse family patterns, paying particular attention to how economic, political and cultural factors influence families. While the focus of the course is on contemporary Canadian families, we will also consider changing family patterns in a global perspective, and will look at the historical development of family forms in Canada and beyond.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC
Note: Students with credit for SOC 207.6 may not take this course for credit.


SOC 211.3 — 1/2(3L)
Families Gender Relations and Social Inequality

This course focuses on everyday life in families and intimate relationships, and exposes students to empirical and theoretical explorations of how micro-level interactions are shaped by and contribute to broader social inequalities.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC
Note: Students with credit for SOC 207.6 may not take this course for credit.


SOC 212.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Criminology

An introduction to the study of crime and criminological theories. In addition to developing a basics understanding of criminological theories, students examine the rich and diverse nature of Canadian criminological research. Specific topics may include: women and crime; restorative justice and peacemaking; youth justice; Aboriginal peoples; and penology.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 214.3 — 1/2(3L)
Social Control

The history of social control with a focus on how social, legal, and political structures constrain individuals and groups by constructing and regulating morality. Topics include state policy, moral panics, the management of risk and public security, and institutions of control including justice, education, medicine, and the media.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 216.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Challenges and Promises of the Changing World of Work

This survey course examines both classic and newly-emerging perspectives in the sociology of work, with an emphasis on the Canadian context. We will focus on the changes in the organizational structures, meaning, and experience of work, paying special attention to differences and inequalities associated with gender, class, and race. The readings include an introductory text, academic journal articles, and an auto-ethnography from the popular literature. The course is divided into three sections. In the first section, the course will cover the nature, distribution, and experience of work in the new ‘knowledge’ globalized economy. The second section focuses on the inside of workplaces. The final section will apply the concepts from the first two sections to contemporary debates about the role of technology, foreign workers, the self-employed, and unions. Throughout the course, students will be invited to draw parallels and contrasts between the course content and their experiences in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC; or approval of instructor.
Note: Students with credit for SOC 215.3 may not receive credit for this course.


SOC 217.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Contemporary Religious Movements

A survey of contemporary religious movements with emphasis upon structural and functional similarities and differences.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 219.3 — 1/2(3L)
Aboriginal Peoples and Justice in Canada

Examines the causes and consequences of the over- and under-representation of Aboriginal persons in the Canadian criminal justice system. Topics include prevention, policing, sentencing and courts, incarceration and accommodations. The particular impacts on Aboriginal youth and Aboriginal women are also considered.

Formerly: NS 219.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.
Note: Students with credit for NS 219 may not take this course for credit.


SOC 220.6 — 1&2(3L)
Sociology and Social Welfare Organization

The development of organized social welfare as a component of an industrialized society; an investigation of the sociological forces that influenced each developmental stage, resulting in the present social welfare phenomena.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 224.3 — 1/2(3L)
Collective Behaviour

The study of social movements, institutional formation, and other collective phenomena such as fads, crazes, manias, panics, rumours, riots and mob outbursts. Collective behaviour theory and related sociological approaches are surveyed and applied.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 225.3 — 1/2(3L)
An Introduction to Survey Research and Data Analysis in Sociology

The study of research design and data analysis designed to familiarize the student with the logic and the mechanics of conducting survey research and with basic data analysis techniques applied to survey data.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.
Note:Students with credit for Stat 244 or equivalent may not take this course for credit.


SOC 227.6 — 1&2(3L)
Critical Issues in Canadian Society

Canadian social structure and social change will be examined. The topics discussed will include: social class and inequality; elites; poverty; regionalism and separatism; labour; ethnicity; and other relevant social issues.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 232.3 — 1/2(3L)
Methods of Social Research

This course provides an introduction to sociological research methods. The course will involve consideration of the relationship between social theory and research, as well as various features of both qualitative and quantitative research. Topics include ethical issues, techniques, and tasks associated with research design, data collections, data analysis and evaluation.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 233.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Sociological Theory

An introduction to sociological theory from its early origins to the contributions of its main founders, Marx, Weber and Durkheim, as well as a selection of contemporary developments including feminism.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 234.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Law

An introduction to the sociological study of law. Topics include the organization and processes of law and legal institutions; the legal profession; dispute resolutions; law and social control; law and social change.

Formerly: SOC 330.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.
Note: Students with credit for SOC 330 may not take SOC 234 for credit.


SOC 235.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Aging

Provides an introductory sociological analysis of aging and old age. Issues will include demographic changes; theoretical approaches to old age; changing family systems and old age; work, leisure and retirement; socio-economic aspects and selected social policy issues. Course content will emphasize the Canadian situation.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 238.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Health Illness and Health Care

Introduction to sociological perspectives on Canadian health care policy and practice, and an examination of various socio-structural determinants of health and illness.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 242.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Sociology of Womens Studies

An introduction to sociological analyses of gender in traditional as well as feminist perspective. Emphasizes gender differentiation and stratification as social processes as well as critical assessment of the assumptions, evidence, and arguments within the various theoretical approaches.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 244.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Mass Media in Canada

Introduction to the sociological study of mass media institutions in Canadian society. Primary focus on the theoretical and historical context of print, broadcast and film media. Issues of ownership, regulation and the socialization of media workers will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 246.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ideology and Mass Communication

Introduction to the study of ways in which doctrines, opinions or ways of thinking of certain individuals or groups come to dominate the content of our mass media. Primary focus on the "manufacture of consent" in our society through an analysis of media messages about work, consumption and leisure in Canadian society.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC.


SOC 260.3 — 1/2(3L)
Social Change and Global Solidarity

An examination of global inequality guided by theories of social stratification and social change. Special attention is devoted to the nature, causes, and consequences of socio-cultural changes in the contemporary world.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC or 12 credit units in the social sciences or special permission of the instructor.


SOC 261.3 — SP/SU
Engaging Social Change and Global Solidarity

Brings students face to face with people, cultures, and struggles for justice in another region of the world. The course will give students hands-on opportunities to meet and discuss current issues with people at an everyday-life level. Finally, it will expand their world view and challenge them to think critically and concretely about global justice and solidarity within the framework provided by sociological perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 260.3 and permission of instructor.


SOC 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

SOC 299.6 — 1&2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.



SOC 300.3 — 1/2(3S)
Sociology of the Arts

This course examines the question of art in society through a number of sociological lenses, for example, historical materialism, symbolic interactionism and social phenomenology. It will examine such issues as the personal identification with art, art as a mnemonic device, as a commodity, as a status item, and as official culture among others. An understanding of the place and use of art in modern society will be its outcome.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC


SOC 303.6 — 1&2(3L)
History of Sociological Theory

The development of sociological thought in Europe and America since the 18th century. Description and criticism of principal historical and contemporary contributions to sociological theory.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC including SOC 233.


SOC 304.3 — 1/2(3L)
Contemporary Marxist Sociology

An introduction to the study of contemporary Marxist social thought. Focuses specifically on the ontological, conceptual and methodological issues, problems and implications inherent in the divergent schools of Marxist sociology.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC including SOC 233.


SOC 305.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ethnic Stratification

The study of the ideology and practice of ethnic inequality from a comparative perspective, and a critical review of theories and research in the area, including analyses of the stratification approach, colonial model, political economy, critical theory, and other models.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.


SOC 306.3 — 1/2(3L)
Contemporary Class Structure

An examination of theoretical models and empirical studies of the structure of social class relations in advanced industrial society. The course will examine patterns of class relations in the western industrialized nations, and will also study selected dimensions of global class structure and inequality.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.


SOC 309.3 — 1/2(3L)
Theories of Social Change

A study of classical and contemporary sociological approaches to social change. The consequences of rapid change in institutional structures.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.


SOC 310.3 — 1/2(3L)
White Collar and Corporate Crime in the Global Context

This course examines the topic of white-collar and corporate crime in the global context. Through assigned readings, lectures, presentations, class discussion, and written assignments, this course will guide students in studying important international issues that shed light on how and why these offenses occur and how they are dealt with. We will begin with a general introduction to the field, including definitions, conceptual, and theoretical issues from the social sciences, law, and criminology regarding what has become known as white collar and corporate crime. Following this, we will discuss various forms of such crime including: unsafe products, unsafe working conditions, environmental crime, financial fraud, governmental crime, official corruption and so forth. Next, we will consider issues regarding globalization, regulation, enforcement, and sanctioning. Finally, we will examine the future of white collar and corporate criminality from both international and comparative perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 212


SOC 311.3 — 1/2(3L)
Youth Crime Justice and Social Control

Designed to provide students with conceptual and practical knowledge in the study of child and youth crime and deviance. The material focuses not only on issues of social justice, but also treatment by institutions of social control including the justice system.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 212 or 214.


SOC 312.3 — 1/2(3L)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice

Analysis of current developments in theories and research on criminogenesis, and the administration of criminal justice. Topics include inequalities of involvement and treatment in the justice system based upon race, class and gender. Developing a general theoretical structure of justice system operation and reform is a key concern.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 212 and (234 or 329).


SOC 313.6 — 1/2(P)
Practicum in Criminal Justice I

An applied course that provides students with professional experience and the ability to critique criminal justice processing and services for aboriginal people. Students are placed in a 12-week work program after consultation with the program coordinator.

Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Aboriginal Justice and Criminology Program.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 232 and 233.
Note: Students with credit for SOC 317 or 318 will not receive credit for this course.


SOC 314.6 — 1/2(P)
Practicum in Criminal Justice II

An applied course that provides students with professional experience and the ability to critique criminal justice processing and services for aboriginal people. Students are placed in a 12-week work program after consultation with the program coordinator.

Restriction(s): Enrolment in the Aboriginal Justice and Criminology Program.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 313.


SOC 317.3
Criminology and Addictions Internship I

An applied course that provides students with professional experience and the opportunity to critique criminal and social justice processing, and addictions services. Students are placed in a 3 week work program after consultation with the program coordinator.

Restriction(s): Registration in this course is restricted to students enrolled in the Certificate in Criminology and Addictions.
Prerequisite(s): Two of SOC 212, 232 or 347 and permission of the department
Note: Students with credit for SOC 313 will not receive credit for this course.


SOC 318.3
Criminology and Addictions Internship II

A capstone practicum course that provides students with professional experience and the opportunity to critique criminal and social justice processing, and addictions services. Students are placed in a 3 week work program after consultation with the program coordinator.

Restriction(s): Registration in this course is restricted to students enrolled in the Certificate in Criminology and Addictions.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 212, 232, 317, 347 and permission of the department
Note: Students with credit for SOC 313 will not receive credit for this course.


SOC 319.3 — 1/2(3L)
Aboriginal People in Urban Areas

Describes and analyzes the growth, distribution, and integration of the Aboriginal population in Canadian urban centres as well as the causes and consequences of the urbanization of Canadian Aboriginal people. Issues covered will include education, law, family life, and native-white relations.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.


SOC 321.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Religion

An analysis of religion in terms of the processes (e.g., secularization and urbanization), which have affected the religious institutions of the West, and of the social and personality structures which, in interaction, shape religion and are shaped by it.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.


SOC 324.3 — 1/2(3L)
Multiculturalism Theories Debates and Realities

Is multiculturalism dead? Is multiculturalism the right model for addressing increased religious, ethnic and racial pluralism? Multiculturalism is a heavily debated concept. This course discusses the core theories and debates around multiculturalism. In order to properly understand both the claimed ‘successes’ and ‘failures’ of multiculturalism, this course will examine the contours of multiculturalism as a philosophy, policy, and practice.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC


SOC 325.3 — 1/2(3L)
Applied Quantitative Research in Sociology

Designed to review the basic analytical techniques in statistics as they are applied to Sociological questions, and to introduce analyses that logically follow from the basic techniques. The students will apply the techniques covered in the class to existing data sets using the SPSS program.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 225 or PSY 233 or STAT 244.
Note: Students with credit for SOC 240 or equivalent may not take this course for credit.


SOC 328.3 — 1/2(3L)
Social Inequality and Health

Explores the inter-relationships between sociological theory, health and illness, and various dimensions of social inequality such as socio-economic security/insecurity, gender, class, race and ethnicity, ability/disability, and access to health care services. Course objectives will be achieved through the integration of theoretical and experiential learning.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units Sociology


SOC 329.3 — 1/2(3L)
Penology and Corrections

An overview of the correctional system; from police, through courts and sentencing, incarceration, release and post-release processes; a look at the key positions and principles involved in custody, punishment and rehabilitation, with an emphasis on the Canadian system, but in a comparative context.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC including SOC 212.


SOC 332.6 — 1&2(3L)
Principles of Research Design

Examination of a series of issues to be resolved in formulating a comprehensive research design. Topics include: formulating the problem; plan of data organization; defining and selecting cases; collection of data; organization, analysis, and interpretation of data. Each student is expected to develop a number of research projects during the year.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC including SOC 232 and 325.


SOC 334.3 — 1/2(3L)
Women and Law Historical and Comparative Perspectives

Locates law in specific socio-economic and political contexts (colonial, local/national and global); it explores the various ways law impacts women's lives and experiences by focusing on women's work and rights (economic, political, and human); and it provides a critical evaluation of feminist theories/practices and their engagement with law and legal processes.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 234 and 12 credit units senior sociology; or minimum 48 credit units university courses.


SOC 340.3 — 1/2(3L)
Marriage Family and Society

Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of changing patterns of marriage and the family within the contemporary social structure and on consequences and resulting trends from such structural changes.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC including SOC 210 and SOC 211.


SOC 341.3 — 1/2(3L)
Institutional Racism and Aboriginal People

A sociological analysis of various models of institutional racism will be examined, and their applications to Aboriginal experiences will be evaluated. Topics include: colonial domination, Aboriginal reserves, urban Aboriginals, resource development, and welfare services.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.


SOC 344.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Women Gender and Development

Examines women's place internationally but focuses on women in developing countries and critiques existing development theories, policies and practices. Themes including gender politics, productive and reproductive labour, population policies, sexuality and reproductive rights, environment and sustainable development, and health will be explored in view of globalization with an emphasis on the roles of international, transnational, and aid agencies.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC plus two of any of SOC 242, SOC 260, POLS 246, POLS 261, POLS 262, ECON 221, IS 211 and IS 212, WGST 210 and/or WGST 250.


SOC 347.3 — 2(3L)
Studies in Addictions

An introduction to the study of addictions, with a specific focus on problematic alcohol and illicit drug use. It introduces students to basic concepts and debates in the addictions field concerning causes, consequences and interventions. Each is examined from four standpoints: the user, society/culture, service providers, and decision/policy makers. Students are invited to question how we know what we know, with an emphasis on the Canadian context. The addictions field is fraught with controversies. This course is designed to assist students with integrating their existing and acquired knowledge and applying it to current debates in a sociologically informed, public health contextualized, and understanding manner.

Formerly: Has been offered as SOC 398.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC or 18 credit units at the University.


SOC 350.3 — 1/2(3L)
Modern Society and Modern Thought

A comprehensive introduction to the history, sociology, and ideas of modern western society, which examines the formation and consolidation of modernity: the development of the modern state; the modern capitalist economy and the industrial revolution; and with an emphasis on the emergence of the Enlightenment and the social sciences.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.
Note: Students with credit for SOC 296 may not take this course for credit.


SOC 360.3 — 1/2(3L)
Globalization and Social Justice

Explores the major theories of globalization, global social stratification and social justice through issues of risks, challenges and opportunities of contemporary social life. Central concerns are the following three themes: what is globalization, what is happening; and what are people doing that is shaping the outcome of the process?

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in sociology, including SOC 110.6 or SOC 111.3 and SOC 112.3 or permission of the instructor.


SOC 379.3
Washington Center Topics in Sociology

Covers topics in Sociology, offered by the Washington Center, Washington D.C. Possible topics include The Most Dangerous Woman in the World: Global Women's Health, Pandemics and Human Rights, Peace and Social Justice, International Human Rights, Public Policies and Empowerment Strategies that Reduce Hunger and Poverty, Global Policy Issues – The US, China and the World, Media, Ethics and the Movies, Reflections of Change: Washington and Nation 1940-2010, Citizenship in a Multicultural Society, Crime, Power and Punishment: White Collar Crime in the Halls of Congress and the Executive Branch, Science, Technology, Society: Improving Organizational and Individual Performance or other topics approved by the Department of Sociology.

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit units of university level study including 6 credit units senior SOC.
Note: Registration in this course is restricted to students selected for the Washington Center Term Abroad program.


SOC 398.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

SOC 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

SOC 402.3 — 1/2(3S)
Sociology of Agriculture and Food

Sociological and related approaches to the study of agrofood systems emphasizing contemporary research on food security and agricultural sustainability, diets and nutrition, agro-industrial restructuring, research networks and the politics of knowledge, globalized commodity chains, land tenure and labour regimes, agricultural development and food aid, farm organizations, food movements, and alternative agrofood networks.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC including SOC 204.


SOC 409.3 — 1/2(3S)
Sociology of Development

This seminar course entails sociological analyses of a range of dramatic national and international occurrences through critical reviews of competing theoretical perspectives and empirical evidences concerning the diverse trajectories of industrialization, economic development and globalization within and across nations with different political and economic systems.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC plus two of any of SOC 344, SOC 360, HIST 303, POLS 341, POLS 346, POLS 362.


SOC 411.3 — 1/2(3S)
Family I Development in Research and Theory

Selected topics concerning marriage and family behaviour: recent developments in research and theory.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC including SOC 210 and SOC 211.


SOC 412.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Ethnic Relations

Theoretical aspects of inter-ethnic processes. Comparative analysis of empirical research on ethnic minorities within Canada and other selected societies.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC.


SOC 413.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Sociology of Religion

An advanced seminar in sociological theories of religious behaviour.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC including SOC 217 or 321.


SOC 415.3 — 1/2(3S)
Selected Problems in Social Control

Theoretical analysis of and empirical research on selected problems in social deviancy and social control.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC.


SOC 418.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Criminology

An analysis and critique of current developments in Canadian criminological discourse, with an emphasis on the specific research issues and their relation to theoretical and policy developments.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC including SOC 212, 234 or 329.


SOC 420.3 — 1/2(3S)
Medical Sociology

Examines both classic and newly-emerging perspectives. Students will engage with the assumptions commonly made about contemporary medical knowledge and practice, as well as its relationship to health and wellness. Drawing on theoretical issues, students will examine social inequalities and health status, alternative healing practices, experience of illness, professions, and new genetics in medicine.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC including SOC 238.


SOC 421.3 — 1/2(3S)
Interpretive Studies in Health

Will focus on interpretive studies of health and illness, with an emphasis on understanding social structure and theory via embodied experiences situated in everyday life. Reflexive scholarship will be a central area of inquiry.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC including SOC 238, or permission of instructor.


SOC 426.3 — 1/2(3S)
Social Policy: Issues and Analysis

Examines the formulation, development, management, and impact of social policies. Includes analysis and evaluation of social policies in income security, social services, employment, housing, and other areas.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC.


SOC 428.3 — 1/2(3S)
Gender and Health

Will focus on selected issues emerging from the domains of sociology of gender and sociology of health and illness. An overview of key issues related to gender and health, as well as a discussion of sociological theory and methodology pertaining to these domains, will be followed by an in-depth focus on selected topics related to gender and health.

Formerly: SOC 436.
Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC including SOC 238 and SOC 328; or permission of instructor.
Note: Students with credit for SOC 436 will not receive credit for SOC 428.


SOC 430.3 — 1/2(3S)
Sociology of Science and Knowledge

The social conditions and consequences of the production, distribution and consumption of scientific and other forms of knowledge are examined in this course. Deploying classical and contemporary theories, specific institutional settings and ongoing debates over concepts and issues such as knowledge society, indigenous knowledge, corporatization of the university, gendered knowledge, etc., are examined.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC.


SOC 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

SOC 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

SOC 802.3 — 1/2(3S) or 1&2(1.5S)
Advanced Seminar in Sociology of Agriculture

Theoretical and research approaches to the political and social economy of agriculture. Emphasis is given to contemporary works on agro-industrial reorganization, agro-food technology, sustainability, state intervention, international trade, aid, and agrarian reform.

SOC 809.3 — 1/2(3S) or 1&2(1.5S)
Sociology of Development

Review of present theories of development. Emphasis will be on the search for missing variables in theories of development produced by western social scientists. Considers development as a function of mobilization of resources and commitment of local people to the process of social change.

SOC 811.3 — 1/2(3S) or 1&2(1.5S)
Family II Marriage

Study and discussion of the recent developments in research and theory in selected aspects of the area of marriage and the family behaviour.

SOC 812.3 — 1/2(3S) or 1&2(1.5S)
Advanced Seminar in Ethnic Relations

Theoretical aspects of interethnic processes; comparative analysis of empirical research on ethnic minorities within Canada and selected other societies.

SOC 815.3 — 1/2(3S) or 1&2(1.5S)
Selected Problems in Social Control

Classical and contemporary theoretical debates on issues of social control with a specific focus in judicial and therapeutic forms of control.

SOC 818.3 — 1/2(3S) or 1&2(1.5S)
Advanced Seminar in Criminology

An in-depth examination of historical developments leading to contemporary criminological discourse in Western societies. An analysis and critique of theory and method which characterizes different schools of criminological inquiry and their relationship to research in an international context.

SOC 820.3 — 1/2(3S) or 1&2(1.5S)
Medical Sociology

Comparative study of Health-Care Systems, Medical Institutions, and the relationships between Medical and Allied Health Professions, Society, the State, and the delivery of health-care.

SOC 821.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Interpretive Studies in Health

Will focus on interpretive studies of health and illness, with an emphasis on understanding social structure and theory vs embodied experiences situated in everyday life. Reflexivescholarship will be a central area of inquiry.

SOC 826.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Social Policy

The formulation, development, management and impact of social policies. Includes analysis and evaluation of social policies in income security, social services, employment, housing and other areas concerned.

SOC 829.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Studies in Gender and Health

Selected issues emerging from sociology of gender and sociology of health and illness. Building from an introduction and overview of key issues related to gender and health, as well as a discussion of sociological theory and methodology pertaining to these domains, in-depth focus will follow on selected topics related to gender and health.

SOC 830.3 — 1/2(3S)
Sociology of Science and Knowledge

The social conditions and consequences of the production, distribution and consumption of scientific and other forms of knowledge are examined in this course. Deploying classical and contemporary theories, specific institutional settings and ongoing debates over concepts and issues such as knowledge society, indigenous knowledge, corporatization of the university, gendered knowledge etc. are critically examined.

SOC 840.6 — 1&2(3S)
Advanced Theory

Recent developments, current trends, and future prospects in sociological theory. Also introduction to formalization of theory; survey of evaluative criteria in Theory Building and methodological problems involved in this process.

SOC 841.6 — 1&2(3S)
Advanced Methodology

An advanced review of the logic, concepts and components of scientific research designs and methods and to quantitative statistical methods for the analysis and interpretation of sociological data.

SOC 891.3 — 1/2(3S) or 1&2(1.5S)
Theory and Method of Social Analysis

An advanced seminar which integrates theory and method in social analysis. Various types of social analysis will be discussed, including theory driven research, policy research, action oriented research and evaluation research. The focus is to develop sound analytical frameworks in conducting social analysis and in assessing research results. Students will develop a theoretically-grounded research problem on the basis of an existing body of literature, design a method, and obtain and analyze data.

SOC 898.3 — 1/2(3S) or 1&2(1.5S)
Special Topics

Concentrated reading in special areas of sociology culminating in a written report. Area of concentration must be different from regularly scheduled courses.

SOC 899.6
Special Topics

Concentrated reading in special areas of sociology culminating in a written report. Area of concentration must be different from regularly scheduled courses.

SOC 990
Seminar

The seminar involves presentations of papers and discussion by graduate students, department and cognate faculty, and visiting scholars. Each graduate student must register in and attend the seminar on a continuous basis, receiving credit when they have successfully presented a seminar.

SOC 992.0
Project

A research paper on a topic approved by the candidate's Advisory Committee is required. The paper should be concerned with discussing a meaningful sociological question and may be empirical in nature, a critical review of the literature or a critical analysis of a substantive problem. The paper will be supervised and evaluated by the Advisory Committee.

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to students registered in the project option.


SOC 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

SOC 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.