This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2015 to April 2016.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2015-2016, please consult the class search website.

For general registration information, please visit students.usask.ca.

As of 2005-2006, certain course abbreviations have changed. Students with credit for a course under its former label may not take the relabeled course for credit.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

The following term designations are used:

  • 1 - Term 1 only
  • 2 - Term 2 only
  • 3 - Term 3 only
  • 1&2 - Term 1 and 2
  • 1/2 - Either Term 1 or Term 2
  • P - Phases (Medicine and Dentistry)
  • Q - Quarters (Veterinary Medicine)

The following instructional code designations are used:

  • L - Lecture
  • P - Practicum/Lab
  • S - Seminar/Discussion
  • C - Clinical Service
  • R - Reading
  • T - Tutorial

Please use the following form to look up courses and find detailed information on course prerequisites, corequisites, and other special notes. To view all 100-level courses in a subject, select a Subject Code and type 1% in the Course Number field. (200-level = 2%, etc.)


Results

TOX 200.3 — 1/2(3L)
Poisons and Pollutants

This unique course provides an overview of the history of toxicology told through stories and case studies covering pivotal and transformative events and discoveries through time. Topics include high profile poisonings in ancient and modern times, natural poisons, classical examples of industrial and environmental pollution, current issues, and important discoveries that led to the development of the field of toxicology and the creation of national regulatory agencies and guidelines. The use of case studies provides students with exciting and memorable examples of how poisons and pollutants have changed history and had important influences at regional, national and international scales. No previous knowledge of toxicology is required.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units of university courses


TOX 298.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

TOX 299.6 — 1&2(6S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

TOX 300.3 — 1(3L)
General Principles of Toxicology

An introduction to the general principles of toxicology. Salient topics include: dose-response relationships, toxicokinetics, target toxicity, mechanisms of toxic action, general principles of toxicity testing, and mechanisms of action of antidotes.

Formerly: VBMS 300.
Prerequisite(s): BMSC 224.3/BIOL 224.3 or PHSI 208.6.
Note: Open to all students. Students with credit for VBMS 300 may not take this course for credit.


TOX 301.3 — 1/2(3L)
Environmental Toxicology

A discussion of major environmental pollutants, their sources, interactions with atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic systems, exposure of people, animals and other biota, and their dose-response relationships. Some of the physical and chemical changes induced in the environment by pollutants, contaminant fate and transport, and bioremediation are also discussed.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and 121 and CHEM 112.


TOX 302.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Aquatic Toxicology

This course will provide an overview of the sources, fate and effects of toxicants in the aquatic environment. Material will center around prevailing issues reported in the popular news media associated with modern and legacy contaminants, and will illustrate how laboratory and field testing can be combined to assess and predict effects on organisms.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3, BIOL 121.3 and CHEM 112.3
Note: TOX 300.3 is recommended.


TOX 310.3 — 1/2(3L-2T)
Radiation and Radionuclide Toxicology

Discusses natural and artificially produced radionuclides, units of radiation measurement, processes of decay and fission, interaction of radiation with matter, doses, risks of effects, and radionuclide transfer through ecosystems. Provides students with the knowledge to assess potential environmental impacts and health hazards from exposure to ionizing radiation from natural background, uranium mining and medical sourses. A 2 hour tutorial once a week is included.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120; BIOL 121; and CHEM 112 or PHYS 115.


TOX 320.3 — 1/2(3L)
Inhalation and Environmental Toxicology of Air Pollutants

Covers the sources, types, behavior and toxic effects of major air pollutants. It is based on four units: 1) the respiratory system as a target for toxic agents, mechanisms of damage and repair, assessment of respiratory function and standardized inhalation toxicity testing; 2) major classes of air pollutants, environmental behavior and effects; 3) climate change and the impact of human emissions of greenhouse gases; and 4) student seminars and rants on current topics in air pollution and inhalation toxicology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3, BIOL 121.3, CHEM 112.3, and CHEM 115.3.


TOX 321.3 — 1/2(3L)
Risk Assessment and Regulatory Toxicology

An introduction to human health and ecological risk assessment and an overview of Canadian and international regulatory requirements for the registration of new products, focussing on safety assessment/toxicity testing of pesticides and human pharmaceuticals, and basic principles of occupational health and industrial hygiene.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units BIOL and 6 credit units CHEM.
Note: TOX 300 and TOX 301 recommended.


TOX 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

TOX 399.6 — 1&2(6S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

TOX 400.3 — 1/2(3L)
Quantitative Toxicology

This course provides students with the knowledge and tools required to design, evaluate and interpret toxicological studies. Students will learn how to identify putative causes of adverse effects, design experiments to evaluate these causes and how to estimate, and communicate about, how toxicant concentrations are linked to adverse effects. The course will include test designs at the organism, population and ecological levels of organization by using examples drawn from human and ecological toxicological disciplines. At the conclusion of this course, students will have gained an understanding of how human and ecological toxicity tests are designed, interpreted and communicated.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300, TOX 301; and one of STAT 245, STAT 246 or PLSC 214


TOX 402.3 — 1/2(3L)
Systemic Toxicology

An overview of the types of injury produced in specific vertebrate, especially mammalian, organ systems by toxic agents and how such injury alters their functions and the overall effect on the body.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.


TOX 403.3 — 1/2(3L)
Biotoxins

An overview of the occurrence, mechanisms of action and clinical effects of commonly encountered plant toxins, mycotoxins, poisonous mushrooms, algal toxins, bacterial toxins, and zootoxins (venomous and poisonous snakes, fish, arthropods, and marine invertebrates).

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.


TOX 412.3 — 1/2(3L)
Toxicology of Industrial Pollutants

An introduction to major categories, sources, routes of exposure, metabolism, mechanisms of action and toxic effects on people and ecosystems of common industrial organic chemicals, pesticides and metals. Emphasis will be placed on pollutants and industries of relevance to Canada.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.
Note: TOX 301 recommended.


TOX 461.3 — 1/2(1L-2S/T)
Applied Toxicology

Provides students an opportunity to evaluate practical toxicology/ecotoxicology problems associated with Saskatchewan and northern ecosystems. Students will be presented with specific toxicological questions or case studies of current relevance which will be examined using research data and library facilities. Written and oral presentations will be required for each problem.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.


TOX 480.3 — 1/2(3P)
Toxicology Research

Students will work on a laboratory, field, library, or theoretical study under the supervision of a faculty member from the Toxicology Group. Each individual project requires approval of a research proposal by the Toxicology Chair in the term preceding registration before permission will be granted. A thorough, written report in thesis format describing the project and the summarized results submitted at the end of the project will be evaluated by the supervisor.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.
Note: Students with credit for TOX 481 may not take this course for credit. This course is only open to Honours students in the fourth year of their Toxicology program, unless special permission has been granted by the Toxicology Chair.


TOX 481.6 — 1&2(6P)
Toxicology Research

Students will work on a toxicology research project under the supervision of a faculty member from the Toxicology Group. Each project requires approval of a research proposal by the Toxicology Chair prior to registration. A written report in thesis format must be submitted at the end of the project.

Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.
Note: Students with credit for TOX 480 may not take this course for credit. This course is only open to Honours students in the fourth year of their Toxicology program, unless special permission has been granted by the Toxicology Chair.


TOX 490.0 — 1&2(1S)
Toxicology Seminar

Seminar presentations by visitors, faculty and students on a broad selection of toxicology issues. Fourth-year students in the Undergraduate Toxicology Program will be required to present one seminar and attend all seminars throughout the full academic year.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.


TOX 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

TOX 499.6 — 1&2(6S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

TOX 820.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Multimedia Environmental Fate Models

Students will gain a detailed understanding of multi-media (water, soil, atmosphere) environmental fate models and hands-on use of current fugacity models. Topics covered include the incorporation of snow, environmental feedback, and bioaccumulation assessments into environmental fugacity fate models. Students will develop a detailed environmental fate model of an inorganic and organic compound of interest to them.

TOX 821.3 — 1(5L)
Human Health Chemical Risk Assessment

Human health risk assessment is now playing a major role in the environmental management of chemicals, from both operational and regulatory perspectives. The overall objective of this course is to provide the basic knowledge to conduct, evaluate and interpret human health risk assessments of chemicals present in the natural and built environments.

TOX 840.3 — 2(3L)
Wildlife Toxicology and Ecological Risk Assessment

Provides a broad exposure to the principles and practices of ecological risk assessment in Canada, with an emphasis on terrestrial habitats and wildlife receptors. In vitro and in vivo laboratory methods and field studies to assess toxicity and sub-lethal exposure in fish and wildlife will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: TOX 300 and TOX 301, or permission of instructor.

TOX 842.3 — 2(3L)
Biochemical Toxicology

Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of various biochemical mechanisms of toxicity, from both biomedical (human) and ecotoxicological perspectives. The focus will be on applying basic knowledge of biochemisty and physiology to the science of toxicology. Classes will involve discussions on topics related to the current scientific literature.

TOX 843.3 — 2(3L)
Environmental Chemodynamics

Provides students with an understanding of the processes that control the movement of organic and inorganic contaminants in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere and will also provide an understanding of the methods used to monitor environmental behavior of potentially toxic contaminants in biotic and abiotic matrices.

Prerequisite(s): One course in ecology or environmental biology and one course in general or environmental chemistry, or permission of the instructor and student's advisor/advisory committee.


TOX 844.3 — 1/2(3L)
Toxicology Techniques

Provides theoretical background and hands-on experience in methods and techniques typically applied by toxicology professionals in academia, industry, and government. It is a modular course that covers a broad spectrum of procedures, ranging from proper handling of field equipment to biological test methods and analytical processing of samples.

Permission of course coordinator required.
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Laboratory Safety course and GSR 962.


TOX 850.3 — 1(3L-2P)
Aquatic Toxicology

A comprehensive overview of the technical aspects of predicting, monitoring, and evaluating the effects of toxic substances in aquatic systems. The class will cover levels of biological organization from sub-cellular to ecosystem. It is designed as an in-depth coverage of aquatic toxicology for students pursuing graduate degrees in the aquatic sciences. Students will be exposed to materials that will be useful in setting exposure standards and assessing hazards to aquatic ecosystems due to point or non-point releases of toxic substances.

Permission of the instructor required.


TOX 898.3
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by existing and visiting faculty, and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

TOX 990
Seminar

Weekly seminars presented by graduate students and invited speakers.Graduate students are required to attend and to present seminars.

TOX 994
Research

Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

TOX 996
Research

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.