Careb-Caurawest 2010
Research Shines
Presenters Biographies

Keynote Presenter:

Session abstracts and presenter biographies will be added as they become available.

The Honourable Lynda Haverstock, C.M., S.O.M, Ph.D., LL. D.

The Honourable Lynda Haverstock became President/CEO of Tourism Saskatchewan in June, 2007. Dr. Haverstock is a highly recognized figure for her academic achievements, innovative ideas, contributions to politics, and for her commitment to her home province as Saskatchewan's 19th Lieutenant Governor, a position that she held from 2000 until July, 2006.

For over 30 years, Dr. Haverstock has shared her leadership and expertise with numerous professional and community organizations. She is a member of the National Strategy Council for the Mazankowski Heart Institute (Alberta), as well as the National Committee of the RCMP Heritage Centre. She acts as Advisor to the President of the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies, serves on the Board of Directors for Shaw Communications, and is a member of the Leadership Council for the National Heart and Stroke Foundation's Heart Truth campaign. She has embraced the role of Honorary Chair of the Saskatchewan MS Clinical Research Campaign. Additionally, she is Honorary Patron of the RCMP Charity Ball in 2010 and 2011, the proceeds of which will benefit the Mackenzie Infant Care Centre.

Dr. Haverstock is the recipient of numerous honours and awards, including the Order of Canada. She has honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Regina, Royal Roads University in Victoria, and Queen's University in Kingston. She is a recipient of the Distinguished Canadian Award, and is named among the University of Saskatchewan's 100 Alumni of Influence. She and her husband, Harley Olsen have four children and nine grandchildren.

Thursday Workshops:

Almost There? Effective Ways to Get IT Done!

Is there a personal or professional challenge in your life that looms large in its un-done-ness? How is it you can be so close but still struggle to complete IT?
In this workshop you'll learn that there are some times when not doing is actually part of the creative process and about debilitating interior roadblocks which, when identified, can be removed to clear the way to successful completion. At this workshop you will learn not only about common roadblocks but also about your own special roadblocks of core beliefs and "big assumptions" that are holding you back from getting IT done. Using effective tools of change dynamics and force field analysis, you will have the opportunity to identify your personal relationship to completion, and design a personal action plan for getting IT done.

Sheryl Mills, Ph.D. is a personal and professional coach, facilitator, and educator with an extensive background in personal and organizational change. Dr. Mills consults with organizations on effective communication, leadership, effective teams, mentoring and coaching; and uses a wide variety of facilitation processes including Open Space, Appreciative Inquiry, and more traditional forms of strategic planning. She is a published author of many academic articles, book chapters, handbooks for educators, and the best-selling Treasure! Creative Adventures in Self-Discovery.

TCPS II: Highlights of Anticipated Changes

Susan Zimmerman, Executive Director of the Interagency Secretariat Panel on Research Ethics will discuss the proposed changes to the Tri Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans.  The policy statement is expected to be released in December 2010 and will set the stage for human ethics review in Canada.

Susan Zimmerman is the Executive Director of the Interagency Secretariat on Research Ethics in Ottawa.  She is a lawyer whose career has focused on health law and public policy. A native of Montreal, she received her undergraduate degree from Bryn Mawr College, civil law and common law degrees from McGill University, and a Master of Laws from the University of Toronto. Her professional experience includes positions as a senior research associate at the Centre for Medicine, Ethics and Law at McGill University, Director of Legislation and Law Reform at the Canadian Bar Association, legal counsel at Health Canada and Director of Research for the Law Commission of Canada. Prior to her appointment to the Secretariat in September 2007, Ms Zimmerman was a member of the Health Law Group at the Toronto office of a national law firm, where she represented health care institutions and a variety of health care professionals. Ms Zimmerman has also been a university lecturer in health law and ethics and a member of research ethics boards.

Communicating TCPS II: Promising Practices for REBs

With the release of the new TCPS, Research Ethics Offices across Canada will be faced with communicating and educating about the new policy.  This session will examine promising practices from institutions across Canada for communicating with a diverse audience that includes REB members, Faculty, Students and the Public.

Dr. Diane Martz is Director of the Research Ethics Office in the Office of the VP Research, at the University of Saskatchewan.  Since her appointment as Director in 2007, she has brought together the human and animal ethics offices at the University of Saskatchewan into one Research Ethics office and developed the University of Saskatchewan Academic Integrity training program for graduate students. Current projects include working with other stakeholders to harmonize research ethics processes in the Province of Saskatchewan and chairing the CAREB Professional Development Committee.  Dr. Martz is also a research faculty member with the Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU) and has extensive experience working on large research teams and in community-based research focused on the social, economic and cultural dimensions of rural health.


Sharon Freitag is the Director of the Research Ethics Office at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.  Prior to joining the team at St. Michael’s, she was a Research Coordinator at the University Health Network and did a stint in the Great White North as the Health Statistician for the Government in the Northwest Territories.  Ms. Freitag obtained her B.Sc. from the University of Alberta, majoring in Genetics and Mathematics. She is the current President of CAREB and has been active with CAREB for a number of years, including teaching REB Administrator 101.

Do You Give INFORMED Consent When You Approve an Animal Use Protocol?

IInstitutional Research Ethics Review Boards function to assure that the available information provided to "research subjects" is sufficient to allow subjects to make informed decisions about their involvement in research, i.e. provide their Informed Consent. Animal Care Committees (ACC) are tasked with the responsibility of providing "informed consent" on behalf of the animal used in research, teaching and testing. Current guidelines suggest this responsibility is achieved through the animal use protocol review process. This workshop involves an interactive examination of the fundamentals of an animal use protocol review with a theoretical discussion of whether ACC approval of a protocol signifies Informed Consent. The workshop is appropriate for new and experienced Animal Care Committee members and others who play a role in an institution's Animal Care and Use Program. The workshop will model a mock peer review of a protocol involving animal use in research. A protocol will be provided in advance to registrants for their review prior to the workshop. During the workshop, participants will be divided into smaller groups and workshop facilitators will encourage an interactive discussion on essential components of a protocol review that include scientific merit, lay summary and study hypothesis/rationale, 3R principles, Humane Intervention Points and Clinical Monitoring, Standard Operating Procedures, and Environmental Enrichment. Important practical outcomes of the workshop include a greater understanding of: a) how to effectively evaluate in an animal use protocol; b) how to provide constructive feedback on critical shortcomings/oversights in an animal use protocol; and c) how to balance ACC and Principal Investigator expectations for animal use in research. The workshop will close with a discussion on what protocol approval implies with respect to Informed Consent.

Dr. Jane Alcorn is an Associate Professor of Pharmacy in the College of Pharmacy and Nutrition at the University of Saskatchewan. She obtained a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in 1994 and a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences (specialization in pharmacokinetics) from the University of Kentucky in 2002. Dr. Alcorn has been actively involved in the University’s Animal Care and Use program since 2005 as a member of the Protocol Review Committee. In July 2008 she became Chair of the Animal Research Ethics Board (AREB). Dr. Alcorn continues an active research program in drug-nutrient and disease-nutrient interactions in the lactating mammary gland and the developing neonate as well as research into the pharmacology of flaxseed lignans and their putative health benefits. These research interests, in addition to numerous collaborations, keep her actively engaged in animal use for research purposes. As an active researcher in Pharmaceutical Sciences and with training in veterinary medicine, Dr. Alcorn has a breadth of knowledge and experience that facilitates her role as Chair of the AREB.

Dr. Ernest Olfert, B.A., D.V.M., M.Sc., recently retired from the University of Saskatchewan's Office of the University Veterinarian, Research Ethics Office. His general responsibilities covered implementing and administering the University's animal care and use program, under the direction of the University Committee on Animal Care and Supply (UCACS), and maintaining compliance with CCAC guidelines and policies. This included being actively involved in developing education and training program materials for the UCACS, and the Post Approval and Compliance Monitoring program.

Dr. Olfert has had a long-standing active interaction with the Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC), primarily in guidelines development, in particular the CCAC endpoints guidelines and the recently updated euthanasia guidelines. He was also involved in creating the CCAC core course training materials. For his contributions the CCAC awarded him the CCAC Outstanding Service Award in 2006. He has also been an active member of the Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Medicine (CALAM) and the Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Science (CALAS) and was involved in updating the CALAM Standards of Veterinary Care, which outline the many responsibilities of laboratory animal veterinarians in the practice of 'animal welfare veterinary medicine'.

Animal Euthanasia and New CCAC Guidelines

The Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC) recently completed a thorough review of their guidelines on euthanasia of animals used in science, complemented by euthanasia guidelines from other countries. The ten general principles for animal euthanasia adopted by the ICLAS Working Group on Harmonization in 2006 provide the foundation for the recommendations made by the CCAC about acceptable methods of humanely killing experimental animals. The use of CO2 for killing laboratory animals is one method discussed in detail.

Dr. Ernest Olfert, a university Veterinarian, will present an introduction and overview on the CCAC Euthanasia Guidelines development, objectives, and implementation.

Dr. Colette Wheler, ARC Director/UCACS Clinical Veterinarian, will discuss the new CCAC guidelines as they relate to impacting on the humane killing of laboratory animals. Details will include CO2 use best practices, procedures, SOPs, training, and equipment requirements.

Dr. Chris Clark, Assistant Professor, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, will present on large animal euthanasia. Dr. Clark will focus on the impact of the new guidelines on the humane killing of livestock in research and teaching, including training, equipment use, and application.

Dr. Marc Cattet, Professional Associate, Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre and Adjunct Professor, Veterinary Pathology, will address the contrasts of dealing with the humane killing of free-ranging wildlife versus euthanasia of domestic or laboratory animals. Dr. Cattet will also discuss 'collecting' wildlife by shooting (compared to 'euthanasia'), and emergency killing of animals in the field including small song birds.

Speakers will include their suggestions or recommendations on the training needed for research personnel in euthanasia methods to become competent, as well as how to assess competence. A discussion period will follow the four presentations.

Dr. Ernest Olfert, B.A., D.V.M., M.Sc., recently retired from the University of Saskatchewan's Office of the University Veterinarian, Research Ethics Office. His general responsibilities covered implementing and administering the University's animal care and use program, under the direction of the University Committee on Animal Care and Supply (UCACS), and maintaining compliance with CCAC guidelines and policies. This included being actively involved in developing education and training program materials for the UCACS, and the Post Approval and Compliance Monitoring program.

Dr. Olfert has had a long-standing active interaction with the Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC), primarily in guidelines development, in particular the CCAC endpoints guidelines and the recently updated euthanasia guidelines. He was also involved in creating the CCAC core course training materials. For his contributions the CCAC awarded him the CCAC Outstanding Service Award in 2006. He has also been an active member of the Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Medicine (CALAM) and the Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Science (CALAS) and was involved in updating the CALAM Standards of Veterinary Care, which outline the many responsibilities of laboratory animal veterinarians in the practice of 'animal welfare veterinary medicine'.

Dr. Colette Wheler is Director of the Animal Resources Centre, and Clinical Veterinarian for the University Committee on Animal Care and Supply at the University of Saskatchewan. After graduating from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in 1984, she spent three years in small animal practice, then returned for graduate studies, completing a Residency and Master of Veterinary Science Degree in Avian and Caged Pet Medicine in 1990. Dr. Wheler remained at the College for 12 more years, caring for the avian, caged pet and wild bird caseload, teaching veterinary students and residents, and pursuing an interest in endangered species conservation. She became a diplomat of the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners, Avian Practice in 1998. In 2002, Dr. Wheler's career path changed directions, and she became a Laboratory Animal Veterinarian, her current occupation today. Her interests include developing graduate student training programs for use of animals in research, investigating practical methods of monitoring and supporting research animals, and the use of animals in veterinary medical teaching.

Dr. Chris Clark is a veterinarian working in the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan.  He is a graduate of Cambridge Veterinary School in the UK and a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.  Dr. Clark was recently responsible for developing a practical course to train veterinary students in techniques for humane euthanasia of large animals.

Dr. Marc Cattet is a wildlife veterinarian and professional research associate with the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre and an adjunct professor in the Department of Veterinary Pathology at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. He provides technical expertise in the areas of wildlife capture and handling to government wildlife agencies in Canada. He also collaborates with several long-term wildlife research programs directed toward detecting, understanding, and reducing the effects of a range of human activities on the health of wild species.

Friday Concurrent Sessions:

What is Research?

University administrators often struggle with this question depending on their functional area. What issues, beyond the traditional sponsored research grants and contracts, should Research Services be devoting their time and effort towards?  Should the research accounting office deal with everything that flows through Research Services – is it all research?  What does the institutional reporting office at the university require to be included in the university financial statement or CAUBO information return with respect to research activity?  Is there a connection between these three important functions, and if not, should there be? 
Specifically, how do universities address such activity as clinical trials, Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) funded projects, service contracts, graduate student awards, conferences, publication grants, trusts to fund research, individual faculty member general research (funded internally or through residual funds), costs of operating research centres (i.e. administrative, facilities costs, etc), overhead recoveries on sponsored research, royalties and/or licensing fees related to intellectual property, infrastructure projects (i.e. not CFI funded), and faculty start up awards (internally funded).
Panelists, from CAUBO and from a research office and a finance office within the same institution, will share their perspectives on this question.

Barbara Crutchley is the Director of Research Services at the University of Manitoba and has been active in research administration since 1978.  Barbara is currently President of the Canadian Association of University Research Administrators (CAURA). As a CAURA member, she has taken on the additional responsibilities of editor of the CAURA Bulletin in the 90s and has presented the workshop for the new research administrators at the CAURA annual meetings.  Her university portfolio responsibilities include: liaising with Government agencies; negotiating research partnerships and contracts; and development of large, interdisciplinary research initiatives.  Among the many workshops she presents at Canadian universities, those on proposal writing and the granting environment are frequently requested.  In 2010 Barbara was invited by IDRC to consult with universities in Central and West Africa in the establishment of research administration offices.

Colin Nicolson received his Certified General Accountant designation in 1997 and has been employed with the University of Manitoba, Financial services since 1997. He is currently the Assistant Manager of Research and Special Fund Accounting that have revenues in excess of $130 million per year. He is active in the preparation of the annual Audited Financial Statements, the annual CAUBO Report, the annual ACMC Report as well as many other reports on research revenues and expenditures. He has participated as a panelist at the annual CAURA conference discussing the roles of Research Services, Financial Services and Advancement Services. He also made a presentation at the 2004 CAURA West conference entitled "Financial Reporting Changes and Demands" which looked at the various reports (Audit, CAUBO, ACMC) and explained why "research revenues" included in each report are different. He has also aided in the development of the university policy on Scholarships, Fellowships and Bursaries and has made several presentations at the University explaining the rules and tax status of the different awards.

George Dew has held the position of Senior Analyst for the Canadian Association of University Business Officers since 2007. In that role he provides support to CAUBO's member committees in a range of disciplines and is responsible for a number of key surveys and reports, notably the FIUC (Financial Information of Universities and Colleges) report, the annual University Investment Survey and, in collaboration with APPA, the Facilities Performance Indicators report for Canadian institutions. Prior to joining CAUBO, Mr. Dew worked in research administration at the University of Ottawa, with previous experience in project management, consulting and product development. He holds a B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Alberta and an M.B.A. from the University of Ottawa.

Preparing for a CFI Outcomes Measurement Study

The CFI OMS is completely different from most other audit/monitoring/evaluation exercises that institutions have undertaken. "The OMS study is designed to assess the degree to which the CFI's investment in research infrastructure is a critical contributing factor in the realization of 5 outcomes: Strategic research planning, Research capacity, HQP, Research Productivity, Innovation." The good news is that most institutions that have been through the OMS process agree that it is a very valuable exercise and worth the huge effort involved. The bad news is that the OMS requires information that is difficult to obtain. Our systems are not well set up to report on outcomes as required by the OMS This session will explain the OMS process and present some ideas on how to prepare for the inevitable visit from CFI.

Dr. Martin Kirk is currently the director of Research Services at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver. Prior to working at UBC Dr. Kirk was the AVP research and director of Research Services at the University of Calgary. Dr. Kirk is the VP of the Canadian Association of University Research Administration (CAURA) and chair of their professional development committee. Dr. Kirk has a PhD in chemistry and spent 10 years in research prior to joining the research administration profession.

Fostering Industry Partnerships

Dale Lemke of Display Systems International (DSI) will provide an overview of his experiences and how this has lead to his current (part-time) role of Entrepreneur in Residence at the University of Saskatchewan. The panel will include an active researcher and member of the Board of his company to compare and contrast the different means of participating in industry funded research. 

Dale Lemke founded his own company called Display Systems International. DSI develops software products compatible with Windows Operating Systems that are used by the cable and private cable TV industry for advertising channels, community events and program listings. DSI has won numerous awards and recognitions.

Mr. Lemke also co-founded Terminal Systems International with his partner Mr. David Reid of Saskatoon. TSI has developed software products that are used by airports to display flight information in the terminal and over the Internet. The company also has software products that automate gate scheduling at the airport, simplify billing processes and standardize airport database functions. TSI has over 30 installations in airports around the world, in countries such as the US, Mexico, Taiwan, Ecuador, Dominican Republic and Canada.

Glen Schuler has been the Managing Director of the University of Saskatchewan Industry Liaison Office since December 2008.  Prior to this, in 2000 Glen joined the Economics Faculty and was the Director of the MBA Program for the University of Tennessee. During this time he globalized the MBA program, reinitiated the entrepreneurship concentration and helped develop a relationship with the local incubator whereby teams of MBA students assisted scientists commercialize new technologies.

He also worked in private industry for 20 years with Tenneco and Columbia Natural Gas where he served in various senior-level positions.   He has taught economics and did energy-related research at the Universities of Houston and Tennessee. He earned his undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin and Masters and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Houston.

Farewell to the Human Subject: Identifying Ways by which the Human Participant Becomes Constituted through Internet Research

Even before it was introduced to the Canadian public, the Tri-Council Policy Statement (TCPS) was fraught with debate around its use of the term “human subject”. Ultimately, however, the “human subject” became a fixture on the research ethics landscape and continues to serve as the inspiration of ethical review across Canada. In the long awaited release of the 2nd edition of the TCPS (available currently in a draft format), researchers are now offered the alternative language of “human participant”.  Not only does this new language imply agency of research participants, but it also more appropriately captures the intrinsic character of interactive research processes, both with respect to traditional avenues of research and newly emergent Internet research.  Through the lens of the TCPS, we can see that in many instances of Internet research, investigators are analyzing text and/or public communities, rather than working with “human subjects”, and that a “human subject” does not exist a prior to any research enterprise, but only becomes constituted through particular participatory forms of research methodology. Thus, the new language of “research participant”, as offered in the new edition of the TCPS, helps to elucidate more clearly the ethical obligations inherent to particular research methodologies. In this talk, I examine the intersections between Internet research, the “human participant” and research ethics review, and consider reasons why the new language moves researchers and reviewers forward in their quest to understand various ways in which human participants are constituted through research.

Dr. Heather Kitchin is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Acadia University. Dr. Kitchin specializes in the areas of sociology of crime and deviance, sociology of addictions, gender studies, and research ethics. She serves as a sub-committee member of Canadian Sociology Association (CSA), Policy, Ethics and Professional Concerns.  She has served as an invited guest for the Secretariat on Research Ethics to speak about research ethics and the Internet.  She has been researching the Tri-Council Policy Statement and human subject research ethics as it applies to Internet research since 2001. Dr. Kitchin is the author of Research Ethics and the Internet – Negotiating Canada’s Tri-Council Policy Statement.  In this book, Dr. Kitchin helps readers pick their way through the minefield that stands in the way of all who seek to find clarity as to the ethics of Internet research.  Dr. Kitchin’s work in this area has resulted in policy changes at the national level as she has informed the work of the Panel on Research Ethics (PRE) sub-committee, that examined research ethics and the Internet, resulting in the use of her human subject research paradigm and material related to this subject which will appear in the 2nd Edition of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans, due out later this year. She is an expert on issues of privacy and ethical use of Internet materials.

The Three Rs - Encouraging and supporting the Three Rs, case studies, and overview of the CCAC Three Rs Microsite

In July 2008, Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC) established a Three Rs Program, following requests from two independent CIHR/NSERC program review panels for CCAC to play a more active role in the implementation of the Three Rs. The Three Rs Program aims to provide a focus for the CCAC's Three Rs mandate: to promote awareness, knowledge and sensitivity to the ethics of animal use in science, further consolidating CCAC's role as one of the National Centres for the Three Rs. Even before the establishment of the Program, the CCAC recognized the need to provide easier access to information to assist in the implementation of the Three Rs, and launched its Three Rs microsite in March 2008, adding additional elements as they were developed.

In March 2009 the Three Rs Search Guide was added to the microsite. When investigators submit their animal-use protocols to the institutional animal care committee (ACC) for review the submission should indicate that consideration has been given to how the Three Rs will be implemented, including whether replacement alternatives could be used to meet the scientific objectives. Searching for alternatives is not a particularly easy task; investigators may know their field of study, but are less well versed in other fields, which might offer potential Three Rs methods. There are many useful resources available on the Internet, but these can be confusing to navigate. The Three Rs Search Guide provides detailed instructions on how to conduct a Three Rs information search in a Step-by-Step Three Rs Search Strategy, and includes questions that can be used to determine when the search is complete, and a worksheet to compile the information before submission of the protocol.

This presentation will provide an overview of the CCAC Three Rs Program, highlight the key elements of the CCAC Three Rs microsite, and, using case studies, provide some examples of how the Three Rs Search Guide can assist investigators in implementation of the Three Rs in their animal use protocols.

Dr. Gilly Griffin, Ph. D., trained as a physiologist in the UK and has a background in biomedical and agricultural research, the common link being the study of insulin and related hormones.
Dr. Griffin has also spent many years working to further the concept of the Three Rs: as a research scientist; as managing editor of ATLA, the peer-review journal published by the UK-based Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments; and as Executive Director of the Canadian Centre for Alternatives to Animals in Research. She is currently Chair of the Scientific Program Committee for the 8th World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences

Dr. Griffin has worked for the Canadian Council on Animal Care, since 1994, where she is currently the Guidelines and Three Rs Programs Director, responsible for overseeing the development of CCAC guidelines, international harmonization and implementation of the Three Rs.

Tri-Agency Monitoring Visits - Expectations and Outcomes

The focus of this session will be on the various aspects of Tri-agency monitoring visits. Representing the Tri-agencies, the presenter will provide some context around the current methodology for the existing monitoring process. In addition, he will (1) provide helpful advice with respect to the planning and preparation for a visit, (2) discuss common findings of past monitoring visits that can be shared, and (3) provide an overview of the changes to the 2010 version of the Tri-agency financial administration. Sufficient time for discussion (questions/comments) will be incorporated with the session and will be encouraged.

Ian Raskin is an Ottawa born, Certified Management Accountant, Certified Internal Auditor and Certified Fraud Examiner. He currently works at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research as the Manager of Internal Controls. Before entering the federal public service, Mr. Raskin worked for Ernst and Young LLP and Ford Motor Company. He and his team are proud to conduct Financial Monitoring visits at CIHR eligible Institutions. He strives to continue to strengthen relationships with CIHR’s partners and increase their knowledge of Agency requirements. He has recently had a beautiful baby girl and adores fatherhood.

Federal Indirect Costs Program

This session aims to provide some diversity on how the Federal Indirect Costs Program (FICP) is managed / administered at various Institutions. The first part of the session will focus on the processes for governance, oversight and distribution of FICP funds at institutional level. The latter part will focus on accounting processes and outcomes reporting, including challenges at year-end.

Dr. Michael Walesiak is the Associate Director-Finance and Information in the Research Services Office at the University of Alberta. Dr. Walesiak is a Chartered Accountant and has been with the University of Alberta’s Research Services Office since 2005. He is responsible for the financial management of approximately $500 million in annual research funding and the information systems that support it. A vital component of this role is the collaboration with faculty and administration throughout the campus as well as with research granting agencies. He has also been a member of the University of Alberta’s General Faculties Council and Senate.

Dr. Amit Shukla is the Assistant Director, Institutional Programs in Research Service at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Shukla is a biochemist by training and prior to becoming a research administrator; he worked as a Research Scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. In his current position, Dr. Shukla is responsible for providing strategic leadership and expertise in the management and administration of three Federally funded Institutional Research programs (Canada Research Chairs (CRC), Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), and Federal Indirect Costs Programs (FICP)).

Research Overhead: Approaches to Policy Development and Review

Most research offices are continuing to develop, review, and refine their overhead policies. Panelists will summarize their approaches and experiences: U of Alberta (completing review of existing policy and embarking on a revised blended-rate based policy), U of Victoria (recently introduced indirect cost policy for externally funded research), and Kwantlen Polytechnic University (recently introduced policy). As part of their presentations, panelists will address important components such as waivers (for such entities as newly developed centres), internal overhead allocations (how does recovered overhead get utilized?), and building direct central and college-based admin support costs into researcher budgets.

Julie Stephens has been with the University of Alberta since 1985. She spent her first 19 years on campus as a student and as an employee working in a research lab as a technician and later as a lab manager in the Faculty of Science. She began working with the Research Services Office at the University of Alberta in the summer of 2004 as an Agreements Administrator working with the Faculty of Agriculture, Life and Environmental Sciences and then took the position of the Research Facilitator for the same Faculty in 2005. She has been in her current position as the Assistant Director of the Natural and Social Sciences team since August of 2008. This team is responsible for the end to end management of research funding coming into the natural and social sciences related faculties, a portfolio that also includes engineering and humanity related faculties.

Stacy Hennings studied at the University of Saskatchewan, receiving her B.A. in 1995 and her LL.B. in 1999.  Upon completing her articling year in 2000, Ms. Hennings was called to the bars of British Columbia and the Yukon Territory.   From 2000 to 2009, she practiced law in Whitehorse, Yukon and Cold Lake, Alberta.  In 2002-03, she was President of the Yukon Branch of the Canadian Bar Association.   In 2004, she advised the Law Society of Yukon concerning amendments to the Legal Professions Act.
During her nine years in private practice, Ms. Hennings practiced in the areas of civil litigation, family law, criminal defence and wills and estates.  Following a move to Victoria, Ms. Hennings joined the Office of Research Services, University of Victoria, as Contracts Officer in December 2009.  Ms. Hennings is currently a member of the Law Society of British Columbia, the Law Society of Yukon and the Law Society of Alberta. 
As Contracts Officer, Ms. Hennings manages the review; negotiation and processing of externally funded research agreements.

Jason Dyer has been the Executive Director of ORS at Kwantlen Polytechnical University since August 2009. He joined Kwantlen after almost 16 years at University of British Columbia (UBC); firstly as a [fresh faced] Postdoctoral fellow and then as an Research Associate, studying Spinal Cord Injury and development of therapeutics for a cure. He also was the CSO in a bio-tech start-up. After leaving active research Mr. Dyer was the Senior Grant Officer in the College for Interdisciplinary Studies at UBC for 4 years.
At Kwantlen Mr. Dyer has been concentrating his efforts on process and policy for the researchers as the Institution transitions into it's University status. Areas of particular interest are Business Systems and Integrity."

Research Ethics Review and the Notion of “Moral Authority” on a Suicide Discussion Board

Dr. Heather Kitchin is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Acadia University. Dr. Kitchin specializes in the areas of sociology of crime and deviance, sociology of addictions, gender studies, and research ethics. She serves as a sub-committee member of Canadian Sociology Association (CSA), Policy, Ethics and Professional Concerns.  She has served as an invited guest for the Secretariat on Research Ethics to speak about research ethics and the Internet.  She has been researching the Tri-Council Policy Statement and human subject research ethics as it applies to Internet research since 2001. Dr. Kitchin is the author of Research Ethics and the Internet – Negotiating Canada’s Tri-Council Policy Statement.  In this book, Dr. Kitchin helps readers pick their way through the minefield that stands in the way of all who seek to find clarity as to the ethics of Internet research.  Dr. Kitchin’s work in this area has resulted in policy changes at the national level as she has informed the work of the Panel on Research Ethics (PRE) sub-committee, that examined research ethics and the Internet, resulting in the use of her human subject research paradigm and material related to this subject which will appear in the 2nd Edition of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans, due out later this year. She is an expert on issues of privacy and ethical use of Internet materials.

Dr. Carl Gutwin is a Canada Research Chair in Next-Generation Groupware and a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Saskatchewan, where he directs the Human-Computer Interaction Lab. Dr. Gutwin's research focuses on the design and evaluation of user interfaces, software for distributed collaboration, electronic games, and interaction techniques.

Daryl Hepting is a member of the Department of Computer Science and an associate member of the Department of Media Production and Studies at the University of Regina. He served on the University of Regina's Research Ethics Board for many years and maintains a Computer science Participant Pool to help involve students in departmental research. He has written about the need to engage students in discussions of ethics. His research is focused on the development of tools to help people deal with and navigate complex information spaces, in application areas as diverse as environmental decision support, eyewitness identification, and multimedia composition. He has worked on Benoit Mandlebrot's Fractals project at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Centre and Yale University. His computer-generated fractals have been published widely.

Elizabeth Alexander is a third year PhD candidate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Saskatchewan. Her clinical interests relate to couples and family therapy. Elizabeth's current research interests relate to the constructions of postpartum depression on online fora, in magazines and in newsprint. Elizabeth completed her undergraduate studies at Queen's University.

Part 1 - Implementing an Effective Post-Approval Monitoring Program

Assurance that 'animal activities are performed as approved' is a critical aspect of animal program management. Whether it is experimental use of animals approved by the IACUC or husbandry procedures established by the veterinary leadership team, the necessity for performing the activity as approved remain a central requirement for continued use of animals in research, testing, or teaching. There are several reasons. Science demands consistent procedural application to assure reliable outcome data. Granting agencies stipulate that receipts of funds are for specified approved activities. Regulators, accreditors, auditors, and oversight officers expect adherence to approved methodology and supporting documentation for all animal care or use. The public insists that when animal use is necessary, it is performed in a humane manner as approved by the animal committee. Were these not sufficient, we must also recognize that the animals enrolled in institutional activities deserve quality professional care and compassionate professional use in methods approved by the committee or veterinary leadership.

This presentation will review the regulatory basis and ethical imperative, which guided one institution's journey to an effective program of on-going animal, care & use oversight. The presentation will review the regulatory basis, describe core compliance auditing procedures and discuss how coupling researchers in an animal welfare partnership can provide a firm foundation for focused practical and humane care and use training. The presentation will include 'lessons learned' along our journey, described methods institutions may use to create and use 'programmatic milestones' as indicators of progress, and leave the attendees with 'best practices' which may be incorporated into their institution's program of care and use.
In this presentation Dr. Banks will describe his institution's journey in developing an oversight program for animal care & use. He will contrast the options available for assuring on-going oversight and describe the advantages /disadvantages of each method. His presentation will also outline an approach of using compliance trends as the basis for institutional training, and focusing institutional efforts to local issues of non-compliance.

Dr. Ron Banks is the Director, Office of Animal Welfare Assurance for Duke University & Duke University Medical Center. He is Board Certified with the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, and is presently serving on the Organizing Committees for the American College of Animal Welfare and the IACUC Administrators Association. As a member of the Council on Accreditation for the Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care, International (AAALAC), he has observed several models of program management and oversight.

Part 2 - Laying the Groundwork for a Successful Post Approval Monitoring Program

Post approval monitoring (PAM) is a combination of practices and procedures designed to ensure that protocols and standards operating procedures are applied in practice as approved in principle. Approximately 200 animal care and use programs participate in the CCAC Program, from small programs that only include one protocol/ year, to some very large ones of over 700 protocols/year. Obviously one glove does not fit all when it comes to PAM. Some institutions use a velvet glove while others require gloves made of more resistant material.

Regardless of the scope of the program and the goal of adapting PAM to the specific needs of institutions, there are a number of elements that should be in place in every program in order to facilitate PAM. The presentation will cover these elements and suggest some approaches that have been used successfully.

Dr. Michael Baar graduated with a D.M.V. degree from the faculté de médecine vétérinaire de l’université de Montréal in 1979. He worked in private practice in Nova Scotia for over 20 years, and during most of that time was the consulting veterinarian for the animal care and use program at Saint Francis Xavier University in Antigonish. He joined the CCAC in 2002 and is presently the Assessment Program Director. Dr. Baar is a past-President of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association.

Part 3 - Discussion Including Perspectives from Dr. Jessie Hare

Dr. M. Jessie Hare, B.Sc. (Hons.) D.V.M. is the Continuing Review Manager - Animal Ethics, University of British Columbia. Dr. Hare completed her undergraduate Zoology degree at the University of Western Ontario in 1990 and obtained her veterinary degree from the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph in 1998. She has a combined research and clinical background having spent her university years working with several research groups and has spent the past 12 years in private practice in British Columbia working with a variety of species. Dr. Hare joined the Office of Research Services at UBC in July of 2009 to implement the Continuing Review/Post Approval Monitoring Program for Animal Research.

Development of Research Metrics for Strategic and Operational Needs

Research metrics are becoming increasingly more and more important to the operations for effective resourcing, evaluation and strategic decision-making, among other things. All institutions are attempting to develop metrics to support analyses at many levels: faculty/college, institutional, and even on an international scale. Two panelists will share the approaches being taken (in progress or planned) from the perspective of a research admin office, while a third panelist will share his approach from a central institutional perspective.

Dr. Martin Kirk is currently the director of Research Services at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver.  Prior to working at UBC, Dr. Kirk was the AVP research and director of Research Services at the University of Calgary. Dr. Kirk is the VP of the Canadian Association of University Research Administration (CAURA) and chair of their professional Development committee. Dr. Kirk has a PhD in chemistry and spent 10 years in research prior to joining the research administration profession.

Dr. Michael Walesiak is the Associate Director-Finance and Information in the Research Services Office at the University of Alberta. Dr. Walesiak is a Chartered Accountant and has been with the University of Alberta’s Research Services Office since 2005. He is responsible for the financial management of approximately $500 million in annual research funding and the information systems that support it. A vital component of this role is the collaboration with faculty and administration throughout the campus as well as with research granting agencies. He has also been a member of the University of Alberta’s General Faculties Council and Senate.

Troy Harkot is the Director of Information Strategy and Analytics at the University of Saskatchewan.  His office is responsible for information management, data governance, reporting, business intelligence, and data warehousing at the institutional level.  Part of the scope of these responsibilities involves developing strategies and plans for managing and leveraging institutional data (including data about research administration) for planning, decision making, and performance measurement activities.  His office is currently collaborating with the Office of Research Services at the University to integrate research-related data into the data warehouse for provision to various campus initiatives.

Mr. Harkot was responsible for developing a campus-wide information strategy for the U of S in 2008.  He holds two university degrees, a professional designation, and is in the process of completing a graduate program where he is focusing on business intelligence and IT governance in higher education.

Effective University Industry Networking Events

This session will focus on best practices for special events designed to encourage new collaborations between companies and university researchers. The discussion will include descriptions and advantages of the different types of networking events that universities can host, from larger informal mixers, to small, sector-focused matchmaking events.

Frank Nolan is the Research and Innovation Development Officer for the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Prairies Regional Office. As Research and Innovation Development Officer for the NSERC Prairies Regional Office, Mr. Nolan is responsible for disseminating information about NSERC programs and developing strategies to encourage new research, training and innovation partnerships across Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Before joining NSERC in 2007, Mr. Nolan was a communications specialist with the University of Manitoba, where he worked as Public Affairs Officer for the Faculties of Medicine and Dentistry, and subsequently Research Promotion Manager, where he was responsible for all of the university’s research-related communications and marketing activities. He has written extensively about university research and researchers, and has many years of experience organizing special events.

Contract Negotiation: Keeping the Peace Amongst Stakeholders

Effectively negotiating research contracts involves meeting the needs of many stakeholders. Institutional Policies and guidelines, sponsoring agency guidelines or restrictive terms and the needs of the researcher are not always aligned. Communicating, clarity of needs and finding effective compromises are critical to successful results. Session speakers will present strategic approaches from the following perspectives: research and admin office, financial office and researcher.

Kevin Rogers is a Contracts Specialist in the Research Services Office of the University of Saskatchewan. He brings over twenty years of contracts experience to that position, with previous experience in financial institutions and private legal practice. He received both his Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Laws degrees from the University of Saskatchewan. His primary responsibilities are now centered on work for the U of S Colleges of Agriciulture and Bioresources and Education, from a wide variety of private, charitable and government sponsors.

Graham Scoles is the Associate Dean (Research and Graduate Studies) in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources. He began his career at the UofS in 1979, serving as Head of the Department of Plant Sciences before being appointed to his current position in 2000. He operates a research program in plant breeding and molecular genetics funded by a combination of industry, producer group and government sources. The College receives about $30M in research funding annually from a variety of sources.

Biobanking

In March 2009, Time Magazine picked biobanking as one of the TOP 10 Ideas changing the world right now. Indeed, large biobanks, linked with health, demographic and administrative data, are proliferating in countries around the world, not least of which is Canada. Scientists are poised internationally with an unprecedented ability to tease out complex interactions between genes and environment, with the hope of enhancing our understanding of health and disease. However, these biobanks create profound legal and ethical challenges. Existing legal and policy frameworks for personal data protection are founded on the concept of informed consent, the application of which has proven to be challenging for advancing biobank research and related scientific progress in Canada. This presentation will explore the degree to which there is a lack of consensus association with the concept of consent in the context of biobanks. For example, is specific and fully informed consent for each project required or is a broad initial consent sufficient?

Timothy Caulfield has been Research Director of the Health Law Institute at the University of Alberta, since 1993. In 2001 he received a Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy.  He is also a Professor in the Faculty of Law and the School of Public Health. Over the past several years, he has been involved in a variety of interdisciplinary research endeavours that have allowed him to publish over 150 articles and book chapters. He is a Health Senior Scholar with the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, the Principal Investigator for a Genome Canada project on the regulation of genomic technologies, and an AllerGen Network project on ethics, evidence and health policy research, and the theme leader for the Stem Cell Network, the ethical legal and social issues of the CIRM-CSCC Leukemia Disease Team and has several other projects funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Professor Caulfield is and has been involved with a number of national policy and research ethics committees, including Canadian Biotechnology Advisory Committee, Genome Canada’s Science Advisory Committee, and the Federal Panel on Research Ethics. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences Expert Panel on Pesticides.  He teaches biotechnology in the Faculty of Law and is the editor for the Health Law Journal and Health Law Review.

Senior Executive Forum

The challenges of leading a Research Services office have intensified due to many factors such as increased accountability, increased competitiveness, and an increased demand for efficient service with limited resources. Collectively, we are dealing with a number of similar issues that could be addressed as a western cooperative front and support system. This session will target these issues using facilitated discussion to produce a road map showing how we can move forward together.

Research Facilitation Expertise: Industry, Health and Community

Research facilitators fulfill a number of roles in research administration, from identifying grant funding opportunities through to developing research project teams and mentoring grant applicants. This workshop will provide an overview of how research facilitators support and promote the research funding effort in natural sciences, engineering and health sciences.

Building relationships and engagement is key to facilitating research with industry and community partners. There are key skills needed for research facilitators for successful industrial and community collaborations. Learn the DOs and DON’Ts.

Irene Mikawoz is the Manager of Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Prairies Regional Office. As Manager of the NSERC Prairies Regional Office, Irene directs a wide range of activities and initiatives aimed at increasing NSERC’s visibility and presence in the region and facilitating collaboration among post-secondary institutions, industry and other agencies involved in science and innovation.

Ms. Mikawoz began her engineering career working in manufacturing with Procter and Gamble in Ontario in 1988.  Before joining NSERC in 2005, she worked at the University of Manitoba in a variety of positions. Her most recent position at the university involved implementing a Student Information System and being an instructor in the Faculty of Engineering. Prior to that, she was the Director of Student Recruitment, the Director of Student Affairs in the Faculty of Engineering, and a counsellor for the Engineering Access Program for Aboriginal students. Irene has also worked as a consultant in her own business, and she is an active member of a variety of boards and committees.

Dr. Sharon Mortimer B.Sc. (Hons.), Ph.D. is a consultant in reproductive biology and in health research communications, particularly research grant development and editing. She trained in clinical embryology at the Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne (1985–1987), and served as a clinical embryologist at the Foothills Regional Fertility Program, Calgary (1987–1991), Laboratory Director at the Genesis Fertility Centre, Vancouver (2000–2003), and inaugural Scientific Director at the Pacific Centre for Reproductive Medicine, Vancouver (2006–2007). She was awarded a U2000 post-doctoral research fellowship in the Department of Animal Science at the University of Sydney (1998–2000), and was Editor-in-Chief of Reproduction, Fertility and Development from 2004–2009. She also held a number of positions in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia between 2003 and 2009 (Research Grant Facilitator, Research Planning & Development Specialist, and Strategic Planning Advisor), and was appointed Senior Director, Programs of the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research in 2009. She has been a full-time consultant with Oozoa Biomedical since April 2010. 

Dr. Harley Dickinson is the Vice Dean (Social Sciences at the University of Saskatchewan, Professor of Sociology and SSHRC Leader. An enthusiastic professor, administrator and researcher with the College of Arts & Science, Dr. Dickinson completed his Ph.D. in Sociology at Lancaster University in the United Kingdom. Joining the University of Saskatchewan as an assistant professor of Sociology in 1983, Dr. Dickinson was granted tenure in 1985 and promoted to the rank of full professor in 1991.
With extensive teaching experience at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, Dr. Dickinson was appointed Associate Dean, Social Sciences, in 2008. He has also served for five years as Head of the Department of Sociology, as well as several years as Director of the Social Research Unit.
Dr. Dickinson believes the College of Arts and Science’s diverse and dynamic environment provides many opportunities to be engaged and creative, and he finds great satisfaction in helping build new research, teaching and learning opportunities for both faculty and students.

Institutional Impact of Research Agreements

This session will outline and discuss the financial impact of research agreement language.  The bigger picture implications and where we need to be more cognoscente of the true nature of the agreements will be discussed.  The difference between reporting revenues gross as a principal versus net as an agent will first be defined, i.e., EIC 123.  Following will be a discussion from the operational perspective of research accounting focusing on the measures within this unit.  The later portion of this session will consist of a workshop style where similar clauses will be presented.  Research Services will provide the perspective from the contracts negotiation, research accounting from a reporting standpoint, and Institution accounting will show how each translates and affects the institutional revenue. 

In the broad context we will be discussing the interrelationships among research services, research accounting and institutional accounting; i.e., how the language in research contracts affects research accounting and therefore institutional accounting. 

Particular attention will be spent on EIC 123 - principal vs. agency relationship.  First, a brief overview of EIC 123 will be provided (by institutional reporting) followed with how implementing this change in reporting requirements affected research accounting at the University of Saskatchewan.  The main part of this session will be more interactive with hands on exercises:  sections of the same (collaborative) agreement will be provided, reviewed, and discussed / analyzed by the participants with the three units of research administration to show the effect differing contract language has on the reporting structure and recorded revenue of institutions as a result of the type of relationship. 

Sandra Baptiste joined the university in 2004 after many years working in accounting and auditing in public practice. Working as a Financial Analyst with the university provided a quick education in the university’s organizational structure and useful experience in research reporting. In 2007 she moved into the role of Manager, Institutional Reporting with responsibility for compiling the annual financial statement as well as fulfilling other internal and external reporting requirements.

Terry Summers is the Director of Financial Reporting at the University of Saskatchewan. Financial Reporting is a department of the Financial Services Division and provides general and research accounting services to the campus community. Financial Reporting works very closely with the Office of Research Services in the administration of research activity at the university. During the past 23 years Terry has been actively involved in budget administration, specific purpose and research accounting, and institutional reporting. Ms. Summers is a Certified General Accountant who holds Bachelor of Commerce and Master of Business Administration degrees from the University of Saskatchewan.

Amanda Sawlor began in the position of Assistant Director, Grants and Contracts with the University of Saskatchewan in February 2010. Prior to accepting the position with the University of Saskatchewan, she worked as Acting Manager, Research Operations with Cape Breton University in Nova Scotia. She has worked in all areas of research administration from financial and institutional reporting, facilitation, to contract negotiation aspects in researcher driven grants and contracts, and institutional funding programs. Having a Master’s in Business Administration (organizational structure) and an Accounting Designation helps to coordinate the many aspects of the research enterprise.

Biobanking Panel Discussion

This panel discussion is a continuation of the Biobanking session. It will include local researchers discussing the practical application. The facilitator is Timothy Caulfield. Panel members include Alan Rosenberg and Alex Rajput.

Dr. Alex Rajput received his M.D. degree (with Distinction) from the University of Saskatchewan in 1994.  He trained in Neurology at the University of Iowa from 1994 to 1998, followed by further training at the U of S including a one-year Clinical Movement Disorders fellowship.  He received his American Board Certification in Neurology in 1999 and his FRCPC (Neurology) in 2000.  Dr. Rajput has been on faculty at the University of Saskatchewan since 2000 and is a Professor in the Division of Neurology.  He is involved in teaching, research, and patient care and spent 5 years as the Neurology residency program director before stepping down earlier this year.

Dr. Rajput has primary interest in Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders.  He is the Director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Program at the U of S, Director of the Frozen Brain Studies Laboratory, and Co-Director of the Saskatoon Movement Disorder Clinic.  Dr. Rajput is involved in both clinical and basic science research with local, national and international collaborators.  He is a member of the Parkinson Study Group, The Parkinson Society Canada Scientific Advisory Board, and the Editorial Review Board of the Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences.  Research funding for Dr. Rajput’s activities has included individual or collaborative peer-reviewed grants from Parkinson Society Canada, CIHR, and the International Essential Tremor Foundation.  The Regina Curling Classic and the Dr. Ali Rajput Endowment have also provided financial support for Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders.

Reflections of (Forty Years as) a University Veterinarian

The last forty years have seen dramatic improvements in all aspects of the care and use of animals in science. This forty-year era also encompasses the history of the Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC), and its significant impacts on standards for the care and use of experimental animals in Canada. How the use of animals in science, laboratory animal science and medicine, and public attitudes have evolved over the last forty years will be highlighted, from the perspective of a laboratory animal veterinarian 'insider'.

Dr. Ernest Olfert, B.A., D.V.M., M.Sc., recently retired from the University of Saskatchewan's Office of the University Veterinarian, Research Ethics Office. His general responsibilities covered implementing and administering the University's animal care and use program, under the direction of the University Committee on Animal Care and Supply (UCACS), and maintaining compliance with CCAC guidelines and policies. This included being actively involved in developing education and training program materials for the UCACS, and the Post Approval and Compliance Monitoring program.

Dr. Olfert has had a long-standing active interaction with the Canadian Council on Animal Care, primarily in guidelines development, in particular the CCAC endpoints guidelines and the recently updated euthanasia guidelines. He was also involved in creating the CCAC core course training materials. For his contributions the CCAC awarded him the CCAC Outstanding Service Award in 2006. He has also been an active member of the Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Medicine (CALAM) and the Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Science (CALAS) and was involved in updating the CALAM Standards of Veterinary Care, which outline the many responsibilities of laboratory animal veterinarians in the practice of 'animal welfare veterinary medicine'.

Saturday Concurrent Sessions:

Monitoring Compliance in Research: "The Essential Role of Senior Administrators"

A number of players and a number of checks and balances need to be in place in order to effectively monitor compliance in research. Animal care committees (ACC) are at the centre of all animal care and use programs, and they are the body with primary responsibility for ensuring that animal users conduct their work as agreed upon in approved protocols (based on institutional policies and standard operating procedures, as well as CCAC policies and guidelines). The authority to oversee compliance is delegated to the ACC from a senior administrator (SA), generally the Vice President of Research, and the SA’s role in supporting the ACC is paramount to a successful animal care and use program. The presentation will outline the main responsibilities of a senior administrator in a successful animal care and use program.

Dr. Michael Baar graduated with a D.M.V. degree from the faculté de médecine vétérinaire de l’université de Montréal in 1979. He worked in private practice in Nova Scotia for over 20 years, and during most of that time was the consulting veterinarian for the animal care and use program at Saint Francis Xavier University in Antigonish. He joined the CCAC in 2002 and is presently the Assessment Program Director. Dr Baar is a past-President of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association.

Sharon Freitag is the Director of the Research Ethics Office at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.  Prior to joining the team at St. Michael’s, Sharon was a Research Coordinator at the University Health Network and did a stint in the Great White North as the Health Statistician for the Government in the Northwest Territories.  Sharon obtained her B.Sc. from the University of Alberta, majoring in Genetics and Mathematics. Sharon is the current President of CAREB.  She has been active with CAREB for a number of years, including teaching REB Administrator 101.

Trevor Davis is Associate VP Research at Mount Royal University - one of several 'midwives' that helped with the institution's college to university transition. His focus is building a culture of scholarship in a university that doesn't want to lose its traditional focus on teaching. He is a member of the CAURA executive, and their representative on the Canadian Research Integrity Forum.
Mr. Davis' research area is in the Geographic Information Science field - specifically on managing uncertainty in large spatial databases. As with most research administrators, he's sure he'll get back into the lab 'really soon'. In the meantime he focuses on studying spatial data as a driver in societal change. Mr. Davis' background is in research admin, human ethics, IT management, as a faculty member, and
previously, in film and television production.

Administration of International Funding

Enabling Research through Project Management

Robyn Roscoe is the Head of Strategic Planning and Project Management at the BC Cancer Agency’s Genome Sciences Centre in Vancouver, British Columbia. Ms. Roscoe
 is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) with nine years of experience in the management of large health research projects. She holds a B.Sc. from the University of Manitoba and has more than 18 years experience in project management in the scientific and technical fields. She is currently responsible for management of project and platform work at the Genome Sciences Centre, representing a total portfolio of more than $50M. Ms. Roscoe teaches a well-attended three-hour introduction to project management workshop for project leaders, researchers and trainees in the BC Lower Mainland Region. She has previously worked in the environment sector and oil & gas industry as a project manager, operations specialist and environmental manager.

Engaging Researchers and Communities in International Research

Purpose: To prepare researchers and community members to conjointly engage in research in an international setting.

The presentation will provide an overview of ethical guidelines that apply to undertaking research in an international setting; as well as, examples of work undertaken with villages being served by Omayal Achi Community Health Centre, Chennai, India. In addition to this, we hope to reflect on ways of engaging researchers and international communities into the ethical process e.g. what can the communities expect from a Canadian researcher.

Much like the development of the CIHR Guidelines for Health Research Involving Aboriginal People (CIHR, 2007), our vision is to enhance and further develop the process for working with international communities that would result in researchers carrying out ethically and culturally competent research. Thus, the framework or guidelines that evolve would facilitate and foster research that would benefit the health of the communities, protect the rights and confidentiality of all involved, and contribute to new knowledge.

Dr. Vivian Ramsden, an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan, is a passionate advocate for community based participatory research. Dr. Ramsden’s unique strengths and vision have lead to the creation of innovative curriculum for the Resident Research Program; evidence-informed community-based health promotion programs; changes in health policy and increased networking on behalf of the College and University both nationally and abroad.

Dr. Ramsden received her Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of Saskatchewan in 2004; a M.S. in Community Health Administration and Wellness Promotion from the California College for Health Sciences in 1998 and a B.S.N. from the University of Saskatchewan in 1991. She has had a license to practice as a Registered Nurse for over 30 years.

Dr. Ramsden’s program of research is grounded in participatory research methods, in which research is done with the community rather than on it. Her research questions and methods are often generated by the observed need for empowering and integrating the voice of the people who are experts in their own plight (health care practitioners, underserved peoples and communities, rural and remote communities, First Nations communities, rural communities in India) into the process. She has been a member of the University of Saskatchewan’s Behavioural REB for the past five years and is currently the Chair of the College of Medicine’s Research Ethics Committee.

In 2009, Dr. Ramsden was appointed as a Director in the International Centre for Collaborative Research in Primary Health Care in Chennai, India. This was as a result of her work over some sixteen years with Omayal Achi College of Nursing in Chennai, India and Omayal Achi Community Health Centre in Arakkampakkam, India.

Dr. Diane Martz is Director of the Research Ethics Office in the Office of the VP Research, at the University of Saskatchewan. Since her appointment as Director in 2007, she has brought together the human and animal ethics offices at the University of Saskatchewan into one Research Ethics office and developed the University of Saskatchewan Academic Integrity training program for graduate students. Current projects include working with other stakeholders to harmonize research ethics processes in the Province of Saskatchewan and chairing the CAREB Professional Development Committee. Dr. Martz is also a research faculty member with the Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU) and has extensive experience working on large research teams and in community-based research focused on the social, economic and cultural dimensions of rural health.

Support Mechanisms for Researchers

Most research-intensive universities and colleges now have internal mechanisms for supporting researchers in their quest to secure research funding. University of British Columbia has several layers of support. On the individual researcher level (health research) they have the HeRRo process which enables high quality internal peer review for individual investigator CIHR grants. This has greatly improved the success rates at the University. On the major program support side they have a group of grants crafters and facilitators that help PIs improve their grant proposals.
 
Nancy McNeil will discuss the success that Simon Fraser University’s faculty members have experienced from the assistance of faculty-based Research Grants Facilitators (GFs).  Currently, there are nine GFs with research credentials and experience who match researchers with funding opportunities, potential collaborators and partners.  These services assist with the development of competitive applications for external grant and contract funding.

Martin Kirk will discuss both of these support mechanisms and a new initiative to provide comprehensive internal peer review across the board (Tri-Council individual investigator) and comprehensive support of major programs.

Susan Blum will speak about the evolution of support services at the University of Saskatchewan as it is going through a transition to better support researchers and to instill a research culture through all areas of the University. Some of the supports include a reorganization of Research Services, a new research facilitator model, and broader Office of the Vice-President Research strategies.

Nancy McNeil is the Research Grants Officer at Simon Fraser University. She holds an undergraduate degree from the University of British Columbia and a diploma in Health Data Technology from the British Columbia Institute of Technology.  In addition to her prior educational milestones, she has also partaken in a short certificate course in Project Management from Simon Fraser University. Ultimately, her goal in the near future is to undertake a Master’s degree and broaden her educational skill set.

In her role as Research Grants Officer, Ms. McNeil takes pleasure in working with SFU faculty members, Grants Facilitators and staff within the various academic units as they team together to prepare and verify research grant applications. She also enjoys working closely with SFU’s Research Accounting staff as they administer SFU faculty research grants. Lastly, she appreciates the support of her three team members who aid her in the planning and execution of research grant administration at Simon Fraser University.

Dr. Martin Kirk is currently the director of Research Services at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver.  Prior to working at UBC, Dr. Kirk was the AVP research and director of Research Services at the University of Calgary. Dr. Kirk is the VP of the Canadian Association of University Research Administration (CAURA) and chair of their professional Development committee. Dr. Kirk has a PhD in chemistry and spent 10 years in research prior to joining the research administration profession.

Dr. Susan Blum is the Director of Research Services at the University of Saskatchewan and presently sits on CAURA's Communications Committee. Her prior administrative experience involves working as the Director of Finance and Administration at the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation and also at the University of Saskatchewan as Director of the Research Ethics Office. While in the research ethics realm, she was actively involved with CAREB as secretary and sitting on the regional and conference organizing committees. Before moving into the research administrative profession, Susan spent eight years conducting ecotoxicology research on polar bears.

Research Information Systems

This session will involve the sharing of system selection and implementation experiences from different perspectives: early stage pre-work and/or analysis, implementation, post-implementation, and lesson learned. Decisions as to the selection of such systems can be very costly in terms of financial and human resources, but prove to provide significant benefits in the longer term. Approaches can vary and some examples will be shared in this session, with time allowed for good discussion.

Robert Dirstein is President of Dirstein Consulting Inc., a new firm supporting research management in the higher education sector with a focus on research information systems. Mr. Dirstein's integrative approach to the challenges of research administration springs from his experience in both small and large research institutions. Prior to starting Dirstein Consulting, he was Director of Research Services at Ryerson University in Toronto where he developed and implemented a research information management system to meet the needs of Ryerson’s quickly growing research portfolio.

Julie Stephens has been with the University of Alberta since 1985. She spent her first 19 years on campus as a student and as an employee working in a research lab as a technician and later as a lab manager in the Faculty of Science. She began working with the Research Services Office at the University of Alberta in the summer of 2004 as an Agreements Administrator working with the Faculty of Agriculture, Life and Environmental Sciences and then took the position of the Research Facilitator for the same Faculty in 2005. She has been in her current position as the Assistant Director of the Natural and Social Sciences team since August of 2008. This team is responsible for the end to end management of research funding coming into the natural and social sciences related faculties, a portfolio that also includes engineering and humanity related faculties.

Trevor Davis is Associate VP Research at Mount Royal University - one of several 'midwives' that helped with the institution's college to university transition. His focus is building a culture of scholarship in a university that doesn't want to lose its traditional focus on teaching. He is a member of the CAURA executive, and their representative on the Canadian Research Integrity Forum.
Mr. Davis' research area is in the Geographic Information Science field - specifically on managing uncertainty in large spatial databases. As with most research administrators, he's sure he'll get back into the lab 'really soon'. In the meantime he focuses on studying spatial data as a driver in societal change. Mr. Davis' background is in research admin, human ethics, IT management, as a faculty member, and
previously, in film and television production.

The New CFI Programming Architecture and Other News from CFI

The Government of Canada’s funding announcements over the summer and fall have outlined to the community how the $600 million, allocated to CFI in Budget 2009, form the basis of the CFI’s new funding architecture — a mix of established and new programs. This session will provide more details about each of these programs.
· Major Science Initiatives ($185 million)
· Colleges ($25 million)
· Leading Edge Fund (LEF) and New Initiatives Fund (NIF) ($155 million)
· Leaders Opportunity Fund (LOF) ($140 million)
· Infrastructure Operating Fund ($95 million).

Sharyn Szick has been a Senior Programs Officer at the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) since 2007. Ms. Szick also has over ten years of experience in research administration having been the Administrative Director at the University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research and Director Research Administration and Clinical Research Manager at the Ottawa Health Research Institute. She holds a Masters in Health Administration from the University of Ottawa and an Honours Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Windsor.

Saturday Round Table Topics

Each of the five sessions will run concurrently for 25 minutes, three times.  This will allow delegates to attend three sessions of their choice.  These will be small discussions and the issues within each group will help drive the conversation.  Some questions will be presented to determine the consistency of the needs.


Table

Hot Topic

Facilitator(s)

1

SSHRC / CIHR

 TBD

2

Controlled Goods

Brian Bjorndal / Debbie Frattinger

3

Undeveloped Projects (REB)

Nicole Benning / Bonnie Korthuis

4

Monitoring Ethics

TBD

5

Small University

Deborah Zornes, Royal Roads University

Research Shines