Special Event for all faculty and graduate students

Brought to you by:
  • Rewarding Community-Engaged Scholarship: Towards the Transformation of University Policies and Practices (a Canadian University Partnership on CES) 
  • The office of the Vice President Research 
  • The office of Outreach and Engagement, University Advancement

“Engaged scholarship, or engagement, refers to teaching and research activities that link academic institutions with external communities in mutually-beneficial knowledge exchange relationships”
- BARBARA HOLLAND

Barbara A Holland is a frequent consultant, author, and speaker, she is well-known for her expertise in the areas of organizational change in higher education with a specific emphasis on the implementation and assessment of community-based learning, engaged scholarship, and community-campus partnerships. In 2006 she received the Research Achievement Award from the International Association for Research on Service-learning and Community Engagement.

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Session 1 - Plenary Session: Best Practices in Community Engaged Scholarship

October 22nd 
12:15 to 1:30pm
Convocation Hall

During the last two decades, many universities have tested their interest in community engagement as a technique to link the work of academic institutions to public issues and purposes in ways that were meant to be mutually beneficial. The common approach to community engagement during this time focused on the development of more reciprocal partnerships with communities, and resulted in an agenda of engaged teaching, learning, research and outreach that was too often sporadic and random in its focus. In that context, community engagement was often seen as a distinct activity. Increased experience and improved practices, however, have begun to reveal the strategic value of engagement as an embedded and integrated method for achieving institutional objectives. In this session Barbara Holland will discuss best practices in Community Engaged Scholarship and engage participants in a discussion of the University’s strategic priorities and the role engagement may play in enhancing the capacity to achieve these goals.  

Who should attend? 

  • Faculty and grad students currently involved in CES
  • Administrators overseeing CES
  • Faculty and grad students who are interested in becoming involved in CES
  • Plenary session is also open to representatives of community-based organizations and NGOs
Session 2 – Workshop: Preparing Faculty for Community Engaged Scholarship and the Academic Career

October 22nd
3:00 to 5:00pm
Graduate Student Commons

RSVP to Roger Herman or 966-7896

Community engagement is an approach to teaching, learning, research, and public service. It is not a unique or separate activity from these core academic responsibilities. In this session, participants will explore the use of engaged methods in the context of scholarly work, especially teaching, learning and research and discuss quality practices, design strategies, and issues about representing, publishing, and presenting engaged scholarship as an aspect of one’s professional academic portfolio. Participants should bring their ideas, experiences, cases, or questions about the role of community engagement in their field of interest.

Who should attend? 

  • Faculty and grad students currently involved in CES
  • Administrators overseeing CES
  • Faculty and grad students who are interested in becoming involved in CES
Session 3 – Workshop: "Evaluating and rewarding community-engaged scholarship: Emerging best practices"

As a scholarly method, community engagement can be applied across the full spectrum of academic work and has been implemented successfully in every discipline. Nonetheless, because it was long seen as a new and unusual technique for teaching, learning and research, questions persist about its scholarly value. In this workshop we will explore issues of documenting, presenting and assessing community engagement as a form of scholarly work.

Who should attend?

This workshop will be of interest to those who are community engagement practitioners and those who may be serving as reviewers or evaluators of colleagues in the context of promotion and performance review (including department heads, deans, and programme coordinators, members of college and university review committees).

Session 4 – Luncheon Discussion: Monitoring and measuring community-engagement: A strategy for achieving institutional goals

A luncheon discussion with university senior leaders.

As a university develops its community engagement agenda and links it more specifically to over-arching strategic goals of the institution, it is essential to develop appropriate schemes to monitor the array of engagement activities and their internal and external benefits and impacts. This session focuses on understanding the importance of monitoring and measuring engagement as a way to encourage strategic benefits, ensure sustainability and quality, and guide investments, and involve the participants in a discussion of effective approaches to monitoring and measuring engagement.

More about Community Engaged Scholarship at the U of S

The challenge: In the past there has often been a disconnect between what communities see as their most pressing needs, and what university researchers decide are their priorities.  Additionally, university incentive systems had worked to discourage the kind partnerships that build over years and require constant tending to ensure they meet both partner's expectations. That's changing, and the University of Saskatchewan is at the forefront of this transformation.

Engagement now increasingly takes the form of mutually beneficial partnerships that produce and apply knowledge in ways where communities not only help define the research projects, but participate in conducting the research and then giving the results real-world application.  This practice, known as community-engaged scholarship (CES), involves faculty applying their expertise to real-world problems and collaborating with partners in other sectors who also bring their knowledge and wisdom to the table. For most universities, more incentives and supports are needed for faculty to engage in this way. 

Addressing the challenge: The U of S is one of eight universities invited in July 2010 to participate in a consortium called “Rewarding Community-Engaged Scholarship in Canada: Transforming University Policies and Practices.” Other consortium members include Memorial University of Newfoundland, University of Alberta, University of Calgary, University of Guelph, University of Regina, University of Victoria and York University. The consortium works to change university culture, policies and practices in order to recognize and reward CES. The consortium’s goal is to realize the potential of universities to improve the quality of life for all Canadians through CES. Specifically the consortium is working to:

  • Establish a learning community around institutional change strategies, policies and practices that support and advance CES;
  • Ensure that university tenure and promotion policies and practices recognize and reward CES;
  • Implement and evaluate innovative mechanisms for developing community-engaged faculty; and
  • Establish a vibrant, sustainable network of universities that support and advance CES

Each university in the consortium  partner has charged a team to lead activities locally. As part of its work with the consortium, the U of S has invited Barbara A. Holland from the University of Sydney to speak with U of S faculty and graduate students from Oct. 22-24 about best practices and innovative ideas in CES. A frequent consultant, author, and speaker, Ms. Holland is well-known for her expertise in the areas of organizational change in higher education with a specific emphasis on the implementation and assessment of community-based learning, engaged scholarship, and community-campus partnerships. In 2006 she received the Research Achievement Award from the International Association for Research on Service-learning and Community Engagement. She has been Editor of Metropolitan Universities journal since 1998 and is co-editor of two refereed journals related to engagement.