Session Abstracts and Presentations

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V&A 2018 Program at a Glance

Addiction Treatment for Incarcerated Males: Program, Partnership and Progress

This presentation will describe the treatment program, the partnership between two government ministries and a regional health authority that govern the Dedicated Substance Abuse Treatment Unit (DSATU), and present evaluation research completed to determine effectiveness.  The DSATU is a specialized unit at the Regina Correctional Centre (RCC) that provides comprehensive in-patient addiction treatment to male sentenced offenders.  The mandate of the DSATU is to reduce substance related criminogenic behaviour through the provision of an intensive, dedicated treatment program within the RCC for male inmates with significant substance abuse issues.  The objectives of the evaluation were to determine if the program improved access to addictions treatment for high risk, high need inmates; adhered to evidence-based practices; reduced criminogenic behaviour, and provided continuity of service at release from custody.

Speakers:
Doris Schnell, Executive Director, Offender Services, Saskatchewan Ministry of Justice
Colleen Quinlan, Director of Health Services and Addictions, Corrections and Policing, Ministry of Justice
Brian Danyliw, M.S.W., Director, Addictions Services Saskatchewan Health Authority, Regina Area

Presentation:

Addiction Treatment for Incarcerated Males: Program, Partnership and Progress

British Columbia’s Anti-Gang Agency: Enhancing Public Safety Through Innovation

This is a panel presentation. Mr. Houghton will speak about the genesis of the initiative, its unique creative aspects, and how the initiative works with the CFSEU BCs greater public engagement strategy. Mr. Vatic will argue that gang violence undermines public safety and creates a myriad of negative and costly consequences to society. He will explore the need to improve understanding of the economic burden of crime in general and violent gang crime in particular. An overview will be provided of how the CFSEU BCs Strategic Research Office has interpreted this strategic policing need, and how they quantify the societal impact of gangs and organized crime in economic terms. Dr. Wilson will discuss the assessment tool developed to assist program coordinators to triage clients, assess client strengths and needs, and monitor progress through the intervention and exiting programs.

Speakers:
Lindsay Houghton, Staff Sergeant, Organized Crime Agency of British Columbia NCO, Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of BC
Peter Vatic, Director of Strategic Research, Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of BC
Catherine M. Wilson, Ph.D., Strategic Research Analyst, Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of BC

Presentation:

British Columbia’s Anti-Gang Agency: Enhancing Public Safety Through Innovation

Current Issues and Initiatives with Indigenous Offenders

Current Issues and Initiatives with Indigenous Offenders

Speaker: Lisa Allgaier, Director General, Aboriginal Initiatives Directorate, Correctional Service Canada

Presentation:

Current Issues and Initiatives with Indigenous Offenders

Evaluative Attitudes Toward Sexual Aggression

Attitudes toward sexual aggression are thought to influence sexually aggressive behaviour, and are considered important in theory, research, and practice. Evaluation is a key feature of attitudes in the general social psychological literature. However, evaluation of sexual aggression (i.e., how negatively or positively sexual aggression is viewed) seems to have received little attention in sexual aggression theory, research, and assessment. In this workshop, he will present his work on the conceptualization and measurement of evaluative attitudes toward sexual aggression, and discuss implications for research and practice. 

Speaker: Kevin Nunes, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Carleton University

Presentation:

Evaluative Attitudes Toward Sexual Aggression

Human Trafficking in Saskatchewan

The Human Trafficking in Saskatchewan presentation includes information on the definition of human trafficking, why people are trafficked, who is vulnerable to being trafficked, how people are recruited, indicators of human trafficking, victim mindset, victim needs, examples of human trafficking in Saskatchewan, identifying and targeting the problem, solutions for reducing human trafficking, and partnerships such as law enforcement, non-governmental organizations, and provincial agencies.

Speaker: Bruce Fenske, Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Presentation:

Human Trafficking in Saskatchewan

Impacts of Operational and Organizational Stress on Public Safety Personnel

Public safety personnel include a broad array of professionals who, as a function of their service, appear very likely to be exposed to potentially traumatic events. Such exposures, particularly when coupled with other operational stressors and organizational stressors, may increase risk for one or more mental health injuries. There have been growing efforts to understand the scope of mental health injuries among public safety personnel and identify evidence-based solutions that may help to mitigate the impact of their work-related stressors.  The presentation will provide a review of the current evidence and provide recommendations for steps towards helping those who serve.

Speaker: Dr. R. Nicholas Carleton, Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Regina & Dr. Rose Ricciardelli, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Memorial University 

Presentation:

Impacts of Operational and Organizational Stress on Public Safety Personnel

A Positive Spin: The Infusion of Strengths into the Assessment and Intervention Process with Justice Involved Adults

Research on the Service Planning Instrument (SPIn), an assessment protocol for justice-involved adults featuring a range of risks, needs, and strengths (i.e. protective factors), will be presented to demonstrate how the inclusion of strengths in the assessment model is apt to (1) increase accuracy in predicting future criminal outcomes, and (2) inform case management efforts. An illustration of how strengths can practically be integrated into case planning will ensue, along with recommendations for gender-informed assessment and intervention practices for women offenders.

Speaker: Natalie Jones, Adjunct Research Professor, Department of Psychology, Carleton University

Presentation:

A Positive Spin: The Infusion of Strengths into the Assessment and Intervention Process with Justice Involved Adults

Serious Violent Offender Response

The Serious Violent Offender Response is a comprehensive, targeted, evidence-based approach intended to reduce the threat posed by high-risk violent offenders in the province of Saskatchewan. The SVOR was formally implemented in May, 2013 and is currently fully operational in two geographic regions of the province, one urban (Saskatoon) and one rural (Battleford area). Current service delivery partners include Public Prosecutions, Adult Corrections, Federal and Municipal Police Services (RCMP and Saskatoon Police Service), the Canadian Mental Health Association - SK Division (CMHA-SK) which created the Justice Community Support Program (JCSP) and most recent, the provision of services by clinical psychology residents from the Saskatchewan Health Authority.  The workshop will provide an overview of the SVOR including the principles, structures, training and initial evaluations. This will also include a front line team presentation identifying roles, communication between partners, integrated case planning, and team approach to providing strategic supervision and rehabilitative services.

Speakers: 
Dean Carey, Director of Offender Programs, Saskatchewan Ministry of Justice
Keira Stockdale, Clinical Psychologist of Policing, Saskatoon Police Service

Presentation:

Serious Violent Offender Response

Toward an Integrated Model of Violence and Mental Health

The purpose of this presentation is to introduce a model of how our perceptions of violent risk and mental health differ from the data are examined, noting the ways that this difference prevents an integrated model. The model uses five basic levels of risk for how mental health variables differentially interact with violence. Results will be presented on intervention efforts integrating violence and mental health. Application to both individual clients and public policy will be discussed.

Speaker: Daryl Kroner, Professor, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Southern Illinois University

Presentation:

Toward an Integrated Model of Violence and Mental Health

Trans and Gender Variant Realities in a Changing Policy Landscape: Evidence Based Approaches for the Frontline

In recent years, a growing number of Canadian provinces have developed and implemented human rights-compliant policies for trans and other gender-variant prisoners. In 2017, the Correctional Service of Canada announced a similar reform of its approach to accommodating gender diversity in federal institutions. Based on research evidence, this workshop will provide narratives of the everyday realities of trans prisoners during, and after, incarceration. It will also present the perspectives and experiences of corrections professionals working with such prisoners. The presentation will conclude with an interactive activity encouraging workshop participants to reflect on the challenges they may face when working with trans offenders, and to identify possible solutions.

Speaker: William Hebert, PhD Candidate in Anthropology and Junior Fellow at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies, University of Toronto

Presentation:

Trans and Gender Variant Realities in a Changing Policy Landscape: Evidence Based Approaches for the Frontline

The Unexpected Journey to a Gentle Considerate Life – A Recovery Story

Mr. Garner will share his experiences of trauma, 38 years of substance use disorder or SUD, and his unexpected recovery into living a gentle and considerate life. Growing up in a violent and chaotic home, the coping strategies were of a child seeking safety and connection. He will discuss the miracle of drugs and alcohol and the darkness of active SUD. He asks just how many time can one lose everyone and everything in a lifetime. He discusses compassion, respect, and safety as a doorway to neuro plasticity or how he changed his mind. He explains how he lives with his past if death is no longer a solution. He shares how he is staying well with a chronic condition how he got friendly with his SUD diagnosis. He will share his life today and explain why he is telling his story.

Speaker: Gord Garner, Executive Director, Community Addictions Peer Support Association, and Chair of Recovery Day Ottawa

Presentation:

The Unexpected Journey to a Gentle Considerate Life – A Recovery Story

Use of Force, New Visibility, and Body-Worn Video

As frequently comes to public attention through contemporary media (both traditional and social), use of force involving criminal justice actors is topical and controversial. Today’s public is, more than ever, engaged with such occurrences and many Canadians are demanding more accountability, legitimacy, transparency, and visibility in the interactions between citizens and law enforcement/corrections. In fact, it can be persuasively argued that ‘new visibility’ is, for all intents and purposes, the new accountability. Within this contemporary criminal justice reality, this workshop will explore body-worn video recording – in terms of practical considerations in addressing concerns with use of force accountability – both within criminal justice institutions and across the public milieu.

Speaker: Gregory Brown, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Sociology, Carleton University

Presentation:

Use of Force, New Visibility, and Body-Worn Video

Violent Crime Behavioural Analysis

The Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System (ViCLAS) was developed by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in 1991 because a need was identified to enhance communication and information-sharing between jurisdictions. In ViCLAS, solved and unsolved crimes are analysed in order to link similar cases based on offender behaviour. By doing so, ViCLAS can assist in solving crimes and lead to the identification of persons of interest in an investigation and provide investigational avenues for police. This presentation will examine how we use offender behaviours to conduct linkage analysis and develop links within ViCLAS.

Speakers:
Samantha Lytle, ViCLAS Analyst, Saskatchewan Provincial ViCLAS Centre, Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Natasha Selinger, ViCLAS Analyst, Saskatchewan Provincial ViCLAS Centre Violent Crime, Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Presentation:

Violent Crime Behavioural Analysis