FAQs

1. Can I bring a movie from home or from a video store and show it in class?
2. Do I need to get permission to show an episode of a TV show or documentary that is freely available on the Internet from the authorized or source site?
3. Can I embed YouTube videos in my Blackboard site?
4. Can I show a YouTube video in class?

1. Can I bring a movie from home or from a video store and show it in class?

Yes, as long as it is a legal, commercial copy played for the purpose of education, the audience is primarily students, and no profit is gained. There is no longer the need to ensure a public performance license is in place. 


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2. Do I need to get permission to show an episode of a TV show or documentary that is freely available on the Internet from the authorized or source site?

The Copyright Act stipulates that it is permitted to record a radio/TV program (via off-air reception, cable, satellite, radio, etc.) and keep it for 30 days for private review. After 30 days, the copy must be destroyed.  If the program is to be used in an educational setting or kept beyond the 30-day preview period, a tariff must be paid to the Educational Rights Collective of Canada (ERCC). Any recording is subject to record keeping provisions.

A radio or television news program or news commentary may be recorded off air and used in an educational setting for up to one year.  After one year, the copy must be destroyed or, to use beyond the one year, a tariff must be paid to the ERCC.  A record must be kept of all recordings made from television or radio.


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3. Can I embed YouTube videos in my Blackboard site?

No, we recommend providing a link to the online source of the video, assuming it has been legally posted. Embedding a player can cause issues, particularly if the content has been posted in an infringing manner. Do not link to any material that you know, or suspect, has been illegally posted and always use links to avoid complications.


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4. Can I show a YouTube video in class?

If a video presentation is freely available on the open Internet (e.g. YouTube), then displaying such a video in an educational workshop or presentation is acceptable, provided that it is drawn live from the Internet at or very near the time of presentation. Similarly, displaying a live website from the open WWW is permissible. Distributing links (even deep links) to online resources is appropriate, as long as security is not being circumvented and that recipients of the links have a legitimate access to the resources.


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