Rocks as Tools

Instructor Dr. Dirk Morrison; Students Mr. Jason Grayston, Mr. William Kapphahn, Ms. Janelle Helfrick-Martin; Mr. Stephen Doubt Geology Consultant Mr. Bryce Stan With thanks to Wanuskewin Heritage Park for access to their teaching collections and Mr. Cameron McRae

Curiculum Connections

RM4.1
RM4.2

Course

ETAD 874 - 2013

Author's Note

Instructor Dr. Dirk Morrison; Students Mr. Jason Grayston, Mr. William Kapphahn, Ms. Janelle Helfrick-Martin; Mr. Stephen Doubt

Geology Consultant Mr. Bryce Stan

With thanks to Wanuskewin Heritage Park for access to their teaching collections and Mr. Cameron McRae

Description

A Powerpoint presentation overview to common stone technologies found in Saskatchewan paired with a hands-on activity relating the hardness of rocks to their potential utility 

Education Utility

A Powerpoint overview to common stone technologies found in Saskatchewan. A Q & A style progression allows students to think about how they were used, and why these stones were used for specific purposes. The answers and additional information are provided in the ppt slide notes, also available in .PDF

Over the 11,000 years since glaciers retreated from Southern Saskatchewan stones have been used and reused as tools, and it is very common for farmers or land users to find relicts of stone technologies. If you found a piece of an old stone hammer in this field, how would you recognize it from a rock that had not been used as a tool? Would you know what to look for? Do you know what stones were used for in your area of the province, and why?

Friedrich Moh was a German scientist who, in 1812, devised a scale to relate the relative hardness of rocks to the minerals that they contain. This is called 'Moh's hardness scale'. For many thousands of years people all around the world were already using the relative hardness of rocks to identify them, and determine how they might be used. This hasn’t been named per-say, but goes well with Moh’s hardness scale – there are more than one cultural ways of understanding and making sense of the property of hardness so we are calling this activity a ‘two-eyed’ scale.

 

 

Resources

Files