ECS at U of S


Joan Klingel Ray, President of the Jane Austen Society of North America (English, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs)

"'The Amiable Prejudices of a Young [Writer's] Mind': The Problems with Sense and Sensibility"
Thursday, March 31, 2005

"Jane Austen 101:  why Jane Austen is popular with both scholars and fans"
Friday, April 1, 2005

Doctor Ray, professor of English at University of Colorado at Colorado Springs,  will speak on "'The Amiable Prejudices of a Young [Writer's] Mind': The Problems with Sense and Sensibility" at a dinner hosted by ECS at U of S on Thursday March 31 at 7:00 p.m. at the U of S Faculty Club.

Dr. Ray will also deliver a talk on Austen's novels and the films that have resulted from them, entitled "Jane Austen 101:  why Jane Austen is popular with both scholars and fans," on Friday, April 1, 7:30 p.m. at the Third Avenue United Church, 304 Third Avenue North

For more information, contact Mary Dykes, JASNA area secretary 966-5982
or
Kathleen James-Cavan for information about the Eighteenth Century Studies Unit dinner. 966-5501


The Eighteenth Century: Current Research & Future Perspectives

Luther College, University of Regina
March 18 & 19, 2005

Co-sponsored by ECS at U of S and the Humanities Research Insitute and Luther College at the University of Regina, The Eighteenth Century: Current Research and Future Perspectives is a two-day conference on recent research by scholars from the University of Regina and the University of Saskatchewan.

Friday, March 18

Opening Address
Raymond Stephanson (English, Saskatoon) “Whose ‘Pope’? Alexander Pope’s Letters and the History of Editorial and Critical Practice”

1. Re-reading Eighteenth-Century France
Chair: Ian Germani (History, Regina)

  • Moishe Black (Emeritus, Languages & Linguistics, Saskatoon) “The French Enlightenment and the Problem of Early Retirement”
  • Clay Burlingham (History, Saskatoon) "Louis XVI: A Curiously Consisten King"
  • Lee Ward (History, Campion College) "Nature and History in Montesquieu's British Constituion"

2. Eighteenth Century Sexuality
Chair: Garry Sherbert (English, Regina)

  • Kate Goldie (English, Saskatoon) "Rogues, Rakes, and Anti-Heroes: Libertinism in 18th-Century English Novels”
  • Holly Luhning (English, Saskatoon) "Writing a Feminine Erotic: Eliza Hawood's Love in Excess"
  • Allison Muri (English, Saskatoon) “The Woman Machine”

Evening’s Entertainment

  • Noel Chevalier (English, Luther College)
  • Dani Phillipson (Theatre, Campion College) David Garrick’s Miss in Her Teens: Performance and Discussion

Saturday, March 19

Special Session
Chair: Barbara Reul (Music, Luther College)

  • Flannery Supeene (Music, Regina) “Performing Claudine: Interdisciplinary Insights into a Contemporary Realization of Schubert’s Operatic Fragment”
  • Pianist: Heather Williams (Music, Regina)

3. Medicine & The Body
Chair: Randal Rogers (Fine Arts, Regina)

  • Kathleen James-Cavan (English, Saskatoon) “Romancing the Stone in 1740: Illness, Normalcy, and Mrs. Stephens' Medicine”
  • Gail Chin (Art History, Regina) “Re-conceiving the East Asian Body in Western Terms: Tradition, Science and Art in Early Modern Japan”
  • Lisa Smith (History, Saskatoon) "Bodily Experience and the Description of Pain in Eighteenth-Century France and England”

4. Technology & Values
Chair: Moishe Black (Emeritus, Languages & Linguistics, Saskatchewan)

  • Alex Sokalski (Languages and Linguistics, Saskatoon) “The Langlée papermill and the experimental paper of Léorier Delisle”
  • William A. Stahl (Sociology, Luther College) "From Virtues to Values: 18th Century Origins of Modern Moral Discourse”
  • Wayne Tunison (Engineering, Regina) “Eighteenth Century Sponsorship of the Technical Subculture”

5. Women, Religion and Society
Chair: Catherine Tite (Art History, Luther College)

  • Gordon DesBrisay (History, Saskatoon) “Church Seating and Social Standing: Women and Pews in 17th-Century Aberdeen”
  • Shawna Geissler (English, Regina) "The Novel Advancement of Feminism in Eighteenth Century England: Sarah Scott’s Conservative Strategy in Millenium Hall”
  • Warren Johnston (History, Saskatoon) “‘A woman who hath no help of man’: the apocalyptic inspirations of Anne Wentworth”

6. Papers on Several Occasions: A Miscellany of New Directions
Chair: Raymond Stephanson (English, Saskatchewan)

  • Noel Chevalier (English, Luther College) "Imperial Sace, Ideal England: Representing Colonial Space in Post-Jacobin English Literature”
  • Karen Sander (History, Saskatoon) "Women and Debt Litigation in 17th-Century Scotland: Giving Credit Where Credit is Due”
  • Suzanne Stewart (English, Saskatoon) "Dorothy Wordsworth’s The Alfoxden Journal: The Visual Art Context”

JOHN FRIESEN (History, Johns Hopkins)

"'Standing on the Shoulders of Giants": Newtonian Natural Philosophy and the Ancients-Moderns Controversy at Christ Church Oxford"

Wednesday, January 12, 2005

The twenty-eighth no-host dinner gathering of Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S (Research Unit) will be held at the Faculty Club, main floor, Wednesday January 12. After food and wine, Professor JOHN FRIESEN (History, Johns Hopkins) will talk about "'Standing on the Shoulders of Giants’: Newtonian Natural Philosophy and the Ancients-Moderns Controversy at Christ Church Oxford." His abstract:

"Christ Church Oxford was a staunchly Tory and High-Church institution in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. For literary historians the college is best known as the home of the Christ Church wits, a circle of Tory High-Church literary men who defended the ancients against the vain pretensions of the moderns led by Richard Bentley and William Wotton. What is less known is the existence of a group of Tory astronomers and natural philosophers at Christ Church who supported the ancients in the battle. Furthermore, they promoted the idea that Newtonian natural philosophy represented a revival of ancient knowledge. Newton was a modest man who 'stood on the shoulders of giants.' This positive image of Newton at Christ Church may help explain why Newton was rarely the subject of direct attack in Tory satires of science and other works."


JESSICA WARNER
(Psychiatry and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto)

"John the Painter: an Eighteenth-Century Everyman"

Tuesday, November 30, 2004

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, the twenty-seventh no-host dinner gathering of Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S (Research Unit) will be held at the Faculty Club, main floor, Tuesday November 30. After food and wine, Professor Jessica Warner (research scientist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto) will talk about "John the Painter: an Eighteenth-Century Everyman." Her abstract:

"James Aitken, alias James Hinde alias James Boswell alias James Hill, was as ordinary as any man could be. The age at which he left for London (twenty) was dead average, as was his height: five feet seven inches. We know about him only because of the extraordinary crimes that he committed (he tried to burn down Portsmouth and Bristol in a bid to secure American independence from Britain). This talk tells the story of his brief life (1752-1777), and reveals the methods that were used to reconstruct both it and the crimes for which he was ultimately hanged. The talk includes musings on why certain young men become terrorists—and on the best ways to catch them."

We'll meet upstairs in the Faculty Club Lounge at 6:30 p.m. for drinks, go downstairs at 7:00 for dinner, and listen to Professor Warner after we’ve eaten. If you wish to come, please leave a message with Pat Harpell (966-5486) or e-mail Ray Stephanson (stephanr@duke.usask.ca) by Thursday, November 25. The set menu will cost around $20 for faculty and $10 for undergraduates, graduate students, and Sessionals. These figures do not include wine. You can pay your bill to Faculty Club servers directly after the meal.

"The 'Gin Craze': the Story of the First Modern Drug Scare"
Wednesday December 1
4:00 p.m. in 101 Arts

Her abstract:

"Early Hanoverian London, the largest city of its time, was home to the first modern drug scare: the so-called ‘gin craze’ of 1720 to 1751. During this time, a new and potent substance, a rotgut liquor that was not gin at all, hit the mass market, causing untold harm to the health of its drinkers—and to the mental health of its detractors. Why the craze occurred where and when it did are the broad subjects of this talk, as are the reasons why the craze ended, the best efforts of Parliament notwithstanding. The talk concludes with certain unflattering remarks about our neighbour’s drug policies.”


CATHY McCLIVE
(École Pratique des Hautes Études, Sorbonne)

"On Whose Authority? Medical Expert Witnesses in the Ancien Régime Courtroom"

Tuesday, November 9, 2004

Co-sponsored by Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S (Research Unit), the Department of History, the Reproductive Biology Research Unit, and the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, the twenty-sixth no-host dinner gathering of ECS at U of S will be held at the Faculty Club, main floor, Tuesday November 9.  After food and wine, Dr. Cathy McClive (École Pratique des Hautes Études, Sorbonne) will talk about "On Whose Authority? Medical Expert Witnesses in the Ancien Régime Courtroom." Her abstract:

"The status of the medico-legal expert rose rapidly in sixteenth and seventeenth century France.  Medical practitioners, physicians, surgeons and midwives competed for identification as medical experts. These experts were called upon by judges to deliver reports in cases involving physical injury, rape, defloration, infant substitution, abortion and infanticide. Parallel, conflicting spheres of medical expertise complicated existing professional rivalries between practitioners within the tripartite structure of the early modern medical world. A hierarchy of different types of medical reports, each ascribed varying degrees of authority, also existed.  The identity of the medico-legal expert was ultimately carved out in the courtroom in a series of causes célèbres in which a range of experts battled for ultimate authority and the last word. This paper will analyse a range of sources including medical texts, guides on report-writing, jurisprudential literature and archival documents examining the juxtaposition between discourse and practice. The paper will address what it meant to be a medico-legal expert in the early modern courtroom, whether medical expertise was gendered, how such experts were identified and the consequences for the patient/practitioner relationship both inside and outside the courtroom."

"Hermaphrodites, Menstrual Bleeding and Sexual Difference in Early Modern France"
Monday, November 8, 3:30 pm
Biology 124

Early modern Europeans were fascinated by hermaphrodites.  While relatively few cases of hermaphrodites occurred in this period (ca. 1500-1800), they became causes célèbres and generated an astonishing amount of medical and judicial literature, entering jurisprudence and medical theory.  Physicians and lawyers were interested in whether or not "true" hermaphrodites existed; what hermaphrodites would look like; if the condition could be diagnosed; and whether or not they could reproduce. Their debates also had wide-ranging social implications: what sex was a hermaphrodite and should hermaphrodites be allowed to marry? Although many historians have assumed that menstrual bleeding was thought to be the clearest sign of sexual and gender difference, very little of the hermaphrodite debate focused on menstruation as an indicator of sex.  Dr. McClive will discuss the implications of the early modern debates about hermaphrodites for the history of sexual difference.

Co-sponsored by the Department of History, the Reproductive Biology Research Unit, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, and ECS at U of S (Research Unit).


WARREN JOHNSTON
(History, University of Saskatchewan)

"Apocalypse now, then: Revolution and Revelation in Restoration England"

Wednesday, September 29, 2004

The twenty-fifth no-host dinner gathering of Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S (Research Unit) will be held at the Faculty Club, main floor, Wednesday September 29. After food and wine, Professor WARREN JOHNSTON (History, U of S) will talk about "Apocalypse now, then: Revolution and Revelation in Restoration England." His abstract:

"The generally accepted and convenient tradition of a 'long eighteenth century' in the study of English literature and intellectual currents tends to overlook concerns which prevailed throughout the whole of the seventeenth century. The political and religious problems which had precipitated the crises erupting in the mid-century British civil wars remained—unresolved—as issues of consequence after the 1660 restoration of monarchy and episcopal church, at least until the immediate aftermath of the Revolution of 1688-89. The tendency to draw a sharp line of demarcation between pre- and post-1660 England is especially evident in the study of apocalyptic thought: while it is accepted as important to understanding the history of early- and mid-seventeenth-century England, such language and belief in the later seventeenth century is most often relegated to the radical margins and lunatic fringes of English society. However, this talk will argue that apocalyptic convictions were not dismissed from mainstream relevance after 1660. Using the Revolution of 1688-89 as a case-study, it demonstrates that hopes and predictions of millenarian fulfilment were present among nonconformist and Church of England proponents alike. In their works are found apocalyptic celebrations of the events of 1688 and 1689, and also the continued concern with issues which had dominated domestic religious and political discourse for the previous three decades."

We'll meet upstairs in the Faculty Club Lounge at 6:30 p.m. for drinks, go downstairs at 7:00 for dinner, and listen to Professor Johnston after we've eaten. If you wish to come, would you please leave a message with Pat Harpell (966-5486) or e-mail Ray Stephanson (stephanr@duke.usask.ca) by FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 24. The set menu will cost around $20 for faculty and $10 for undergraduates, graduate students, and Sessionals. These figures do not include wine. You can pay your bill to Faculty Club servers directly after the meal. (PLEASE NOTE that the Faculty Club will bill us if you're on the list of attendees but do not show up.)


LARRY STEWART
(History, University of Saskatchewan)

"Enlightenment Matters"

Wednesday April 14, 2004

The twenty-fourth no-host dinner gathering of Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S (Research Unit) will be held at the Faculty Club, main floor, Wednesday April 14. After food and wine, Professor LARRY STEWART (History, U of S) will talk about "Enlightenment Matters." His abstract:

"This paper explores the relationship between experimentation and the place of industry in the late eighteenth century. At a time when discovery and conquest laid the foundation for European imperialism, new epistemological innovations emerged from the smoke of European factories. Industrial laboratories and the rapid spread of experimental practice produced the enlightenment ideals of innovation and the promotion of reform behind the American to the French Revolutions."

Professor Stewart has written widely on the history of science in the 17th and 18th centuries. He is author of The Rise of Public Science: Rhetoric, Technology, and Natural Philosophy in Newtonian Britain (Cambridge University Press, 1992).

We'll meet upstairs in the Faculty Club Lounge at 6:30 p.m. for drinks, go downstairs at 7:00 for dinner, and listen to Professor Stewart after we've eaten. If you wish to come, would you please leave a message with Pat Harpell (966-5486) or e-mail Ray Stephanson (stephanr@duke.usask.ca) by FRIDAY APRIL 9. The set menu will cost around $20 for faculty and $10 for undergraduates, graduate students, and Sessionals. These figures do not include wine. You can pay your bill to Faculty Club servers directly after the meal. (PLEASE NOTE that the Faculty Club will bill us if you're on the list of attendees but do not show up.)


FRANS De BRUYN
(English, University of Ottawa)

"From Poetry to Statistics and Graphs: Eighteenth-Century Representations of the 'State' of British Society"

Wednesday March 17, 2004

The twenty-third no-host dinner gathering of Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S (Research Unit) will be held at the Faculty Club, main floor, Wednesday March 17. After food and wine, Professor FRANS De BRUYN (English, University of Ottawa) will talk about "From Poetry to Statistics and Graphs: Eighteenth-Century Representations of the ‘State' of British Society." His abstract:

This paper explores the eighteenth-century origins of two interrelated modern phenomena: statistics and graphs or charts. The heavily mathematical orientation of present-day statistics obscures its literary and cultural origins in the eighteenth century. Those origins are signalled in what to us may seem a startling critical observation made by William Hazlitt, who states that he regards Henry Fielding's novel Joseph Andrews as ‘a perfect piece of statistics.' Hazlitt's remark points to important links between early statistical studies and such literary forms as topographical poetry, with its prospect views, the novel, travel writing, georgic-descriptive poetry, and political surveys. All these forms are built upon common epistemological and cultural assumptions and reveal analogous implications of construction. I also explore the origins of the line graph, the bar graph, and the pie chart in the late eighteenth century. In many interesting ways, these visual representations share important characteristics with the literary forms mentioned above. Among the writers I examine are Edmund Burke, Henry Fielding, Alexander Pope, James Thomson, and Arthur Young.

Professor De Bruyn is President of the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and author of The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form (Clarendon Press, 1996). He has written widely on literary history and its contexts, including eighteenth-century georgic poetry and agricultural science, seventeenth-century scientific writing, the South Sea Bubble, and political oratory. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.

We'll meet upstairs in the Faculty Club Lounge at 6:30 p.m. for drinks, go downstairs at 7:00 for dinner, and listen to Professor De Bruyn after we've eaten. If you wish to come, would you please leave a message with Pat Harpell (966-5486) or e-mail Ray Stephanson (stephanr@duke.usask.ca) by FRIDAY MARCH 12. The set menu will cost around $20 for faculty and $10 for undergraduates, graduate students, and Sessionals. These figures do not include wine.


ROB ILIFFE
(Centre for History of Science, Technology and Medicine, Imperial College, London)

"A 'Swarme of hopefull Authors': Newton, Flamsteed and the great pretenders of Augustan Britain"

Friday March 5, 2004

The twenty-second no-host dinner gathering of Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S (Research Unit) is jointly sponsored by the Department of History and ECS at U of S, and will be held at the Faculty Club, main floor, Friday March 5. After food and wine, Professor Iliffe will talk about "A ‘Swarme of hopefull Authors': Newton, Flamsteed and the great pretenders of Augustan Britain." His abstract:

In this paper I examine the intertwined careers of (Sir) Isaac Newton and the Astronomer Royal John Flamsteed, in the context of the momentous political, religious and intellectual transformations that took place in Britain between 1713 and 1715. Just as two of Newton's proteges, Samuel Clarke and William Whiston, were being pilloried for their apparently heretical beliefs, Newton finished the second edition of his Principia Mathematica (in 1713). Although this was published to great acclaim, Newton had recently overseen the publication of a version of Flamsteed's star catalogue that had practically been wrenched from the hands of Britain's leading astronomer. This naturally provoked the irrevocable enmity of the irascible astronomer, who felt that his life's work had been stolen by a perverted cabal. As the Peace Treaty of Utrecht ended hostilities between Britain and France, so the demise of Queen Anne in 1714 saw the accession to the throne of the Protestant Hanoverian George I. At the same time, Newton's chief proselytiser Jean-Theosiphile Desaguliers proved the truth of Newton's theories of physics to visiting Dutch and French natural philosophers by means of public demonstrations. Yet Newton was now pitched into a monumental philosophical battle (conducted through his lieutenant, Clarke), with the man who was already effectively Hanoverian court philosopher, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. In 1714-16 Flamsteed read piles of hopeless efforts by projectors to capitalise on the rewards offered by the famous Longitude Act of 1714, a piece of legislation promoted by London scientific lecturers and actually drafted by Clarke and Whiston. Flamsteed noted bitterly that these hucksters were on a par with the Old Pretender—the son of James II (and would-be James VII of Scotland)—who had just been exiled from France to Rome and who briefly invaded Scotland in 1715, and with the bad-tempered and deceitful scientist Flamsteed merely referred to by his initials as SIN.

Dr. Iliffe gained a PhD on Newton's theology from Cambridge University and is currently Reader in History of Science at the Centre for History of Science, Technology and Medicine at Imperial College. He has published a number of articles on early modern history and the history of science, and is completing a major book for Yale University Press on Newton's theology as well as researching the history of relations between scientists and instrument-makers in early modern England. He is editor of the journal, History of Science, and is also Editorial Director of The Newton Project (see www.newtonproject.ic.ac.uk). The Newton Project is the most extensive publication of Newton's personal and theological material that has ever taken place. The latest release, consisting of about two hundred thousand words of text and nearly a thousand images, brings together substantial amounts of previously unpublished Newton material from a number of major scholarly institutions in Europe and the U.S.

We'll meet upstairs in the Faculty Club Lounge at 6:30 p.m. for drinks, go downstairs at 7:00 for dinner, and listen to Professor Iliffe after we've eaten. If you wish to come, would you please leave a message with Pat Harpell (966-5486) or e-mail Ray Stephanson (stephanr@duke.usask.ca) by MONDAY MARCH 1. The set menu will cost around $20 for faculty and $10 for undergraduates, graduate students, and Sessionals. Alas, these figures do not include wine. You can pay your bill to Faculty Club servers directly after the meal. (PLEASE NOTE that the Faculty Club will bill us if you're on the list of attendees but do not show up.)


BARBARA REUL
(Musicology, Luther College, U of Regina)

"Johann Friedrich Fasch (1688-1758) and His Times: Sacred and Secular Traditions in Eighteenth-Century Germany" (Sponsors: Office of the Vice-President Research, Music Department, Lutheran Theological Seminary, and Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S)

January 28-31, 2004

1. Wed. January 28, 6:30 pm, U of S Faculty Club Dinner Lecture: Prof. Barbara Reul (Musicology, Luther College, U of Regina), "Catherine the Great and Musical Life at the Court of Anhalt-Zerbst, c. 1740-1790."

The twenty-first no-host dinner gathering of Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S (Research Unit) will be held at the Faculty Club, main floor, Wednesday January 28. After food and wine, Professor BARBARA REUL (Musicology, Luther College, U of Regina) will talk about "Catherine the Great and Musical Life at the Court of Anhalt-Zerbst, c. 1740-1790." Abstract:

"When Princess Sophie Auguste Friederike of Anhalt-Zerbst left in 1744 to travel to St. Petersburg and married the future Tsar of Russia in 1745, she single-handedly put the small duchy of Anhalt-Zerbst on the map of world history. Catherine never returned to her home north of Leipzig, but supported her immediate family and their subjects to the best of her abilities. The court showed their gratitude to Catherine in various ways, including an annual festive celebration of her birthday on 2 May. Over the course of half a century, the resident Kapellmeister, Johann Friedrich Fasch (1688-1758) and his successor Johann Georg Roellig (1710-1790), Catherine's old keyboard teacher, composed a large number of sacred birthday cantatas and secular, quasi-operatic serenatas whenever members of the ducal family—including Catherine—celebrated birthdays. Drawing from primary resource material held at the Landeshauptarchiv Sachsen-Anhalt, Abteilung Dessau, this lecture will provide an overview of music composed and performed in honour of Catherine the Great and her family at the court of Anhalt-Zerbst from c. 1740 to 1790. Special attention will be given to a recently rediscovered birthday serenata for Catherine the Great in 1757 by J. F. Fasch at the State Library in Berlin, as well as a hitherto-unknown libretto of a cantata in honour of Tsar Peter from 1763, housed at the Francisceum Library, Zerbst, Germany."

We'll meet upstairs in the Faculty Club Lounge at 6:30 p.m. for drinks, go downstairs at 7:00 for dinner, and listen to Professor Reul after we've eaten.

If you wish to come, would you please let Ray Stephanson know by phone (966-5511) or by e-mail (stephanr@duke.usask.ca) by FRIDAY JANUARY 23. The set menu will cost around $20 for faculty and $10 for undergraduates, graduate students, and Sessionals. Alas, these figures do not include wine. You can pay your bill to Faculty Club servers directly after the meal. (PLEASE NOTE that the Faculty Club will bill us if you're on the list of attendees but do not show up.) There are only 50 table spaces for the dinner, so please sign up early!

2. Thurs. January 29, 7:30 pm, Lutheran Theological Seminary: Eighteenth-Century Instrumental Music from Germany: The Contributions of Johann Friedrich Fasch and His Contemporaries Georg Philipp Telemann, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, and Johann Sebastian Bach. Carissa Klopoushak (violin), Dr. Walter Kreyszig (flute), Jennifer McAllister (flute), Marie Sellar (bassoon), Prof. Kathleen Solose (organ). General admission: $10.00; Seniors and Students: $5.00.

3. Friday January 30, 7:30 pm, Education Building, rm 1004, Public Lecture (Multimedia Presentation): Prof. Barbara Reul (Musicology, Luther College, U of Regina), "Just a minor Master in the Shadow of Johann Sebastian Bach?"

4. Saturday January 31, 7 pm, Lutheran Theological Seminary: Lutheran Communion Service including North American Premiere of Johann Friedrich Fasch, Deutsche messe.


LISA SMITH
(History, University of Saskatchewan)

"Trust and the 'Unruly' Patient in the Eighteenth Century"

October 28, 2003

The twentieth no-host dinner gathering of Eighteenth-Century Studies at the U of S (Research Unit) will be held at the Faculty Club, main floor, Tuesday October 28. After food and wine, Professor LISA SMITH (History Department, U of S) will talk about "Trust and the 'Unruly' Patient in the Eighteenth Century."

Abstract: "For medical historians, eighteenth-century sources of all kinds seem to provide variations on the following theme: doctors and patients were in a state of continual battle. Patients regularly complained about the charlatanism of their doctors, while their doctors in turn bemoaned their patients' disobedience. But what does this apparent struggle reveal about the workings of the doctor-patient relationship? Letters written by English and French patients to their doctors emphasise how central trust was to early modern medicine. With few ways available to determine what was wrong with a patient, doctors had to rely on what the patient told them; doctors and patients needed each other if they were to 'enact' a cure. Since no medical practitioner could guarantee a cure, many possible medical authorities co-existed—and both doctor and patient could have varying degrees of medical expertise and experience. However, personal authority was always subject to one's reliability. When a doctor and patient stopped trusting each other, problems readily led to cries of unruliness or charlatanism. The ways in which trustworthiness and authority were defined show how the balance of power within doctor-patient relationships was constantly being re-negotiated."

We'll meet upstairs in the Faculty Club Lounge at 6:30 p.m. for drinks, go downstairs at 7:00 for dinner, and listen to Lisa after we've eaten.

If you wish to come, would you please let Lisa Vargo know by phone (966-2781) or by e-mail (vargo@sask.usask.ca) by FRIDAY OCTOBER 24. The meal will cost around $20 for faculty and $10 for graduate students and Sessionals; alas, these figures do not include wine. You can pay your bill to Faculty Club servers directly after the meal. (PLEASE NOTE that the Faculty Club will bill us if you're on the list of attendees but do not show up.)

Menu:

Assorted greens
served with Cucumbers, Red Onion, Tomatoes
and drizzled with Parmesan Peppercorn Dressing

Medallions of Pork Tenderloin
with Apricot Glaze and Fruit-Port Sauce

Fresh vegetables

Oven Roast Potato

Apple & Dried Cranberry Crisp

Tea and Coffee

 


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