Picture of  Paul Newton

Paul Newton Associate Professor and Department Head, Educational Administration; Interim Department Head, Educational Psychology and Special Education

Dr Newton's research and teaching areas include school improvement, the principalship, leadership, and staff development´╗┐.

Address
3073 Education

Profile

Dr Paul Newton is Associate Professor and Department Head in the Department of Educational Administration. Prior to coming to the University of Saskatchewan, he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Alberta, a principal in the North East School Division, and an instrumental music teacher in Saskatoon Catholic Schools. His research interests include administrative practices, the principalship, educational improvement, teacher leadership, and theoretical constructions of leadership and administration. He has presented at international conferences, as an invited speaker for ministries of education in various countries, and has engaged in international professional development work for policy makers and school administrators.

Dr. Newton’s most recent projects include: a study of the teaching principal; an international study of school autonomy and 21st century learning outcomes (with colleagues from Alberta, Finland, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Israel, Australia, and Hong Kong); a study of the professional learning of post-secondary vocational educators: and a study on principal decision making for school improvement.  He serves as co-editor of the Journal of Educational Administration and Foundations.

Teaching

Undergraduate Teaching

  • EADM 423 – Leading Organizations: An Introduction to Leadership Theory and Practice

Graduate Teaching

  • EADM 816 – Instructional Leadership for the Enhancement of Teaching
  • EADM 821 – Organizational Behaviour in Education
  • EADM 881 – Organizational Paradigms and Analysis
  • EADM 892 - International Perspectives on the Principalship/Headship

Selected Publications

  • Riveros, A., & Newton P. (in press). Ontological issues in educational administration: The ontological status of educational organizations. In The Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory (EEPAT).
  • Newton, P., & da Costa, J. (in press). School autonomy and 21st Century learning: The Canadian context. International Journal of Educational Management.
  • Riveros, A., Newton, P., & Burgess, D. (in press) Leadership standards and the discursive repositioning of leadership, leaders, and non-leaders: A critical examination. In G. Lakomski, S. Eacott, & C.W. Evers (Eds.), Questioning leadership: New directions for educational organizations. London: Routledge.
  • Newton, P., & Riveros, A. (in press). Toward an ontology of practices in educational administration: Theoretical implications for research and practice. In S. Eacott, & C.W. Evers (Eds.), New Directions in Educational Leadership Theory (pp. xx-xx). London: Routledge.
  • Newton, P., & Burgess, D. (2016). The best available evidence: Wise decision making for school improvement. Rotterdam, NL: Sense.
  • Burgess, D. & Newton, P. (2015). Educational administration and leadership: Theoretical foundations. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Newton, P., & Riveros, A. (2015). Toward an ontology of practices in educational administration: Theoretical implications for research and practice. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 47(4). 330-341.
  • da Costa, J., Newton, P., Peters, F. & Parker, L. (2015). School Autonomy: 21st Century Developments. In M. Carmo (Ed.). Proceedings of International Conference on Education and New Developments 2015 (pp. 454-458). Porto, Portugal. International Conference on Educationa and New Developments.
  • Newton, P. (2015). Employee Engagement in Saskatchewan School Divisions: Literature Review, Conceptualization and Policy Analysis. Saskatchewan Educational Leadership Unit.  (62 pages).
  • Wallin, D., & Newton, P. (2014). Teaching principals in small rural schools: “My cup overfloweth”. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 60(4), 1-18.
  • Newton, P., Riveros, A., & da Costa, J. (2013). The influence of teacher leadership in the career advancement of schoolteachers: A case study. Journal of Educational Administration and Foundations. *(delayed publication. Released in December 2014)
  • Riveros, A., Newton, P., & da Costa, J. (2013). From teachers to teacher-leaders: A case study. International Journal of Teacher Leadership, 4(1). 1-15.
  • Newton, P. & Wallin, D (2013). The teaching principal: An untenable position or a promising model?. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 59(1), 1-17.
  • Wallin, D. & Newton, P. (2013). Instructional leadership of the rural teaching principal: Double the trouble or twice the fun?. International Studies in Educational Administration, 41(2), 19-31.
  • Riveros, A., Newton, P., & Burgess, D. (2012), A situated account of teacher agency and learning: Critical reflections on Professional Learning Communities. Canadian Journal of Education, 35(1), 202-216.
  • Newton, P., Burgess, D., & Burns, D. (2010). Models in educational administration: Revisiting Willower’s “theoretically oriented” critique. Educational Management, Administration, and Leadership, 38(5), 578-590.
  • Newton, P., Tunison S., & Viczko, M. (2010). The school principal’s role in large-scale assessment. Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy, 105, 1-24.
  • Newton, P. M. (2009). The research-practice gap in education: A view from both sides. In K. Anderson (Ed.),The leadership compendium: Emerging scholars of Canadian educational leadership (pp. 56-68). Fredericton, NB: The Atlantic Centre for Educational Administration and Leadership (ACEAL).
  • Newton, P. M. & Burgess, D. (2008). Exploring types of educational action research: Implications for research validity. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 7(4), 19-30.
  • Newton, P. M., Burgess, D., & Robinson, S. (2007). Chapter 3: Saskatchewan. In A.S. Chan, D. Fisher, & K. Rubenson (Eds.), The evolution of professionalism: Educational policy in the provinces and territories of Canada(pp. 49-64). Vancouver, BC, Canada: Centre for Policy Studies in Higher Education and Training.
  • Newton, P. M. & Sackney, L. (2005) Group knowledge and group knowledge processes in school board decision making. Canadian Journal of Education, 28(3) 434-457.
  • Newton, P. (2005) Ensemble Learning: A Lens for Group Learning in Schools. Journal of Educational Thought, 39(1), 75-90.
  • Newton, P. M. (2004). Leadership lessons from jazz improvisation. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 7(1), 83-99.

Selected International Presentations

  • Newton, P. (2015). Educational improvement, distributed leadership, and school autonomy: The Canadian perspective. Tampere University. Tampere, Finland.
  • Newton, P. (2015). Educational improvement and distributed leadership. Invited Panel: International Panel Escuela Normale de Colotlan. Colotlan, MX.
  • Newton, P. (2015). The training of principals: Academic and practical knowledge. Invited Panel: International Panel Instituto Superior de investigación y docencia para el magisterio. Guadalajara, MX.
  • Newton, P. (2015). Educational improvement and distributed leadership. Invited Presentation: Escuela Normale de Xalapa. Xalapa, MX.
  • Newton, P. (2015). Educational improvement and distributed leadership. Invited Panel: Second International Encounter of School Principals. Guadalajara, MX.
  • da Costa, J. & Newton P. (2014). 21st century policy context: SBM in Alberta. Presented to the Israeli Ministry of Education. Jerusalem, Israel.
  • Riveros, A., Newton, P., & Burgess, D. (2014). Agency and leadership: Exploring the assumptions behind conceptualizations of leadership in Canadian policy documents. Commonwealth Council on Educational Administration and Management (CCEAM) International Conference, Fredericton, Canada.
  • Burgess, D. & Newton, P. (2013). A comparison of the qualification standards for superintendents of education in Canadian provincial jurisdictions. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS) Annual Conference, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
  • Newton, P. (2012). Public policies and new perspectives for principals’ training programs and systems. Invited Keynote: First International Encounter of School Principals. Guadalajara, Mexico.
  • Newton, P., Arroyo Rodriguez, J., Acosta, M., & Varela, F. (2012). First international panel on the prinicpalship. Escuela Normal Superior de Jalisco. Guadalajara, Mexico.
  • Riveros, A., .Newton, P., & da Costa, J. (2012). The influence of a cascade model of leadership in the career advancement of school teachers: A case study. Commonwealth Council for Educational Administration and Management. Limassol, Cyprus.
  • Newton, P., Riveros, A., & Parker, L. (2012). Teachers’ conceptual understandings of teacher leadership. Commonwealth Council for Educational Administration and Management. Limassol, Cyprus.
  • Peters, F., Newton, P., & Burgess, D. (2012). The changing contexts of principal preparation programs: Alberta and Saskatchewan. Commonwealth Council on Educational Administration and Management (CCEAM) International Conference, Limassol, Cyprus.
  • Newton, P. & Peters, F. (2012). The Changing Contexts of Principal Preparation Programs in Canada. British Educational Management, Administration, and Leadership Society. Manchester, United Kingdom.
  • Newton, P., da Costa, J., Peters, F. & Montgomerie, C. (2011).Educational technology standards for educational leaders in Alberta. Ed-Media World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia, and Telecommunications. Lisbon, Portugal.
  • Chitpin, S. & Newton, P. (2010). The objective knowledge growth framework in [and] principal’s decision making. International Professional Development Association, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
  • Burgess, D. & Newton, P. (2010). An Analysis of Academic Educational Administration in the Commonwealth. Commonwealth Council on Educational Administration and Management (CCEAM) andAustralian Council for Educational Leadership (ACEL) International Conference, Sydney, Australia.
  • Riveros, A., Newton, P., & Burgess, D. (2010). A Critique of Professional Learning Communities in Canada from a Situated Cognition Perspective. Commonwealth Council on Educational Administration and Management (CCEAM) and Australian Council for Educational Leadership (ACEL) International Conference, Sydney, Australia.
  • Peters, F. & Newton, P. (2010). Restructuring, reform and student achievement in Canada. British Educational Leadership, Management, and Administration Society, Reading, United Kingdom.
  • Newton, P. & Peters, F. (2010). Educational quality perspectives in two Canadian provinces. British Educational Leadership, Management, and Administration Society, Reading, United Kingdom.
  • Newton, P., Tunison, S., & Gowans, W. (2010). The school principal’s role in large-scale assessment. British Educational Leadership, Management, and Administration Society, Reading, United Kingdom.
  • Burgess, D. & Newton, P. (2008). International educational leadership, administration, and management programme inventory: Canada, South Africa, and the United Kingdom. Commonwealth Council on Educational Administration and Management (CCEAM) Conference, Durban, South Africa.
  • Newton, P., Burgess, D., & Viczko, M. (2008). International educational leadership, administration and management programme inventory. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS) Annual Conference, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
  • Newton, P., Peters, F., & da Costa, J. (2008). International educational leadership, administration, and management programme inventory: Undergraduate courses. British Educational Leadership, Management, and Administration Society, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
  • Peters, F., da Costa, J., & Newton, P. (2008). The downside of school choice. British Educational Leadership, Management, and Administration Society, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
  • Burgess, D. & Newton, P. (2008). The representation of professional identity through online social networking websites. Fourth International Conference on Technology, Knowledge & Society, Northeastern University, Boston, United States.