Policy and Schedules

Winter 2016 (Term 2)
Internship Schedule: January 4, 2016 - May 6, 2016
November 6 - 30, 2015 Applications available for partner teachers and interns (request sent out to divisions)
December 5, 2015 Placement letters sent out to teachers
December 11, 2015 Placement letters distributed to interns at Orientation
Fall 2016 (Term 1)
Internship Schedule: August 24, 2016 - December 14, 2016
February, 2016 Intern application opens for students only. Closes March 9, 2016
Week of March 9, 2016 Applications available online at placement.usask.ca for partner teachers. (request sent out to divisions):
May 15, 2016 Placement letters sent out to teachers
May 30, 2016 Letters go out to Interns
EDUC 321 (Sept. - Dec.) and EDUC 322 (Jan. - Apr.)

School Schedule:

Week of
September 28 - December 3


Sequential (2x a week - Tuesdays/Wednesdays)
ITEP (1x a week - Thursday)

Week of
February 1 - Week of April 4
Week of May 18 Email request send out to Divisions for next year's school placements
Week of September 7 Coordinators call schools to confirm numbers
Week of September 21

Schools receive list of Teacher Candidates

Spring 2016 - this includes PAA, Program '98, ITEP, SUNTEP and Music (do not need a music placement though)
  • 2 weeks of student teaching
  • Some may need 4 weeks (2 courses)
May 2 - 13 Field Experience #1
May 16 - 30 Field Experience #2 (If needed)
Week of February 23 Email request to division and schools
Week of April 15 Confirmation emails go out to schools and teachers
  • This up to $300 bursary supports travel by teacher candidates related to out-of-town field experiences (student teaching within PSSD; internship; 411.3 Inquiry Course) and is distributed on a needs' basis within available College funding (one bursary per TC per year).
  • Information will be provided directly to TCs at student teaching and internship orientations, and through Inquiry Course instructors.

Download Application

Professional Growth Portfolio

Purpose of the Professional Growth Portfolio (PGP)

Throughout your program in the College of Education, University of Saskatchewan, you will be working towards achieving professional competencies as indicated in the program goals. You will use the Professional Growth Guide & Portfolio during your studies to help you link your on-campus courses and field study experiences to enhance your professional development. You are responsible, as a teacher candidate, for using the Professional Growth Portfolio as a tool for gathering evidence of your progress toward achieving program goals and outcomes. The outcomes include competencies listed on the Saskatchewan Teachers Federation (STF) website. STF competencies are indicated in bold type.

The Professional Growth Guide/Portfolio is similar in scope and purpose to individual professional planning guides and portfolios widely used by teachers.  It is designed to help you:

  • Focus your thinking on the connections between theory and professional practice
  • Focus on students' learning as well as on theorizing about your own teaching practice
  • Identify strategies for working towards professional goals and teaching competence
  • Identify criteria for measuring progress
  • Develop professional interactions and discussions among colleagues including other teacher candidates, cooperating teachers, course instructors, internship facilitators
  • Share responsibility for leadership
  • Increase your professional knowledge, involvement, and develop ownership of your own learning and growth

How to Use the Professional Growth Portfolio

During your professional studies in the College of Education you will use the Professional Growth Portfolio (PGP) Tables to collect and analyze evidence of your progress toward program goals and outcomes. You will be asked to use your portfolio as a springboard for reflective writing, theorizing and inquiry activities that take place as part of coursework and field study assignments. You are encouraged to keep your records in electronic form for easy sharing with peers, instructors, cooperating teachers and internship facilitators.

Evidence

Throughout your professional learning experiences you are required to collect evidence by adding to your record on a regular basis (daily or every second day would be best but weekly is acceptable). The information in the PGP is directly linked to your internship assessment. Be sure to DATE your entries  and add the most recent entry at the 'top' so that entries  read in reverse chronological order (e.g., March 29, March 27, March 22)

Include evidence that indicates (is an indicator of) your progress toward the outcomes noted. You can include:

  • Records of your observations collected during school and community visits
  • Feedback/discussions with peers, cooperating teachers, instructors, internship facilitators while preparing to work with learners
  • Instructional plans (lesson & unit plans)
  • Feedback from peers, cooperating teachers, instructors, internship facilitators related to teaching
  • Elements of on-campus coursework are welcome here, including assignments (or parts of assignments), critiques/summaries of articles read, and records of professional discussions

Analysis & Reflections

In this part of the table, you will record your analysis of the evidence you have gathered. In your analysis you should:

  • Deconstruct your observations - that is, reflect on the gathered data to address the general question: What have I learned about the students and their learning needs?
  • Examine and explain changes in your own behaviours/ways of thinking
  • Explain how you think the evidence recorded is an indicator of your progress toward particular outcomes

Goal 1: Demonstrate professional (personal) competencies including:

1.1 the ability to maintain respectful, mutually supportive and equitable professional relationships with learners, colleagues, families and communities;
1.2 ethical behaviour and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners;
1.3 a commitment to social justice and the capacity to nurture an inclusive and equitable environment for the empowerment of all learners; and
1.4 a commitment to service and the capacity to be reflective, lifelong learners and inquirers.

Goal 2: demonstrate knowledge competencies including:

2.1 knowledge of Canadian History, especially in reference to Saskatchewan and Western Canada;
2.2 proficiency in the Language of Instruction;
2.3 knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit Culture and History (e.g., Treaties, Residential School, Scrip, and Worldview);
2.4 ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately
2.5 knowledge of a number of subjects taught in Saskatchewan schools (disciplinary/interdisciplinary knowledge); and
2.6 ability to strive for/pursue new knowledg

Goal 3: demonstrate instructional competencies including:

3.1 the ability to utilize meaningful, equitable and holistic approaches to assessment and evaluation; and
3.2 the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings.

Goal 4: demonstrate curricular competencies including:

4.1 knowledge of Saskatchewan curriculum and policy documents and applies this understanding to plan lessons, units of study and year plans using curriculum outcomes as outlined by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Education;
4.2 the ability to incorporate First Nations, Metis, and Inuit knowledge, content and perspective into all teaching areas
4.3 the capacity to engage in program planning to shape ‘lived curriculum’ that brings learner needs, subject matter, and contextual variables together in developmentally appropriate, culturally responsive and meaningful ways

TECC Competencies Goals in Tables

Download as Word document

Pre-Internship

Purpose of the Field Study Handbook

During pre-internship field study, partner schools are teacher candidates' professional homes where teacher candidates learn about teaching and learning by collaborating with teachers to enhance student learning.

During pre-internship field study teacher candidates

  • Deepen professional understandings by actively participating in the life of the school through a wide range of activities.
  • Deepen their ability to engage with students, colleagues, parents and administrators.
  • Increase awareness of broader perspectives on education and the community and the school in society.
  • Further develop their professional identities, gain insight into the realities of classroom teaching and evaluate their career choice.

To embrace opportunities to learn from and in field study experiences

  • Learn about learners (e.g., through observation, small group facilitation)
  • Support teachers in meeting the needs of students in the school
  • Can focus on Learning Improvement Plan goals/outcomes
  • Be flexible and sensitive in adapting to the school and community contexts
  • Plan/co-plan and implement individual lessons and team-teach with other teacher candidates and, possibly, the cooperating teacher

To participate in classrooms at different grade levels, and engage in all aspects of the life of the school as much as possible.

To complete assignments connected to on-campus course work

To gather evidence of their progress toward achieving program goals (using the Professional Growth Portfolio)

  • Maintain an up-to-date PGP (including analysis of and reflections on evidence) and use this as a focus for discussions

To participate in opportunities for teacher talk/reflective conversations

To experiment and take risks

  • Volunteer to read with individual students
  • Volunteer as a small group facilitator
  • Volunteer to share personal expertise with teacher and students
  • Volunteer to implement mini-lesson plans
  • Implement a sequence of lessons as indicated in field study course syllabi

Complete Field Experience Assessment forms with partner teachers at the end of term 1 and term 2.

  • Use PGP for this
  • Can be done collaboratively by several teachers and in-school administrators

Allow opportunities to learn

  • Teacher Candidates in experiences from observation to small group facilitation to implementation of mini-lesson plans to a sequence of lessons as indicated in their field study course syllabi

Allow opportunities for broad based experience:

  • Multiple grade experiences
  • Multiple subject area experiences
  • Participation in extra-curricular events and PD opportunities, by invitation

Allow opportunities for teacher talk:

  • Extend PLCs where appropriate - one large or several small groups of teachers and teacher candidates focused on one or more school or divisional goals related to the Learning Improvement Plan
  • Discuss targets for lessons and observations, preview lesson plans with teacher candidates before the teaching takes place to ensure the plan fits with your classroom learning goals (post-instruction discussions can include written suggestions for the teacher candidate)
  • Encourage "Learning Focused Supervision"

Experiment/Risk-take

  • Support teacher candidates in carrying out peer coaching and team teaching (with each other and with you)

Assist teacher candidates in gathering evidence for their Professional Growth Portfolio (PGP)

  • Provide formal written feedback for a variety of lessons forms and formats taught by the teacher candidate (individual/small group/whole class)
  • Allow opportunities for teacher candidates to complete assignments connected to on-campus course work

Complete Field Experience Assessment forms with teacher candidates at the end of term 1 and term 2.

  • Use PGP to complete Field Experience Assessment forms
  • Collaborate, as appropriate, with teachers and in-school administrators

a. Liaise between the partner school and on-campus instructors

b. Garner and share understandings about goals of the school related to the Learning Improvement Plan

c. Support opportunities for partner school staff and in-school administers to learn together with teacher candidates and College faculty about ways of enhancing student learning

d. Support school in establishing a Steering Committee (teachers, teacher candidates, principal, or vice-principal, faculty teaching the cohort)

e. Help schedule and coordinate activities during school visits

f. Organize opportunities, as appropriate (e.g., a 'sign up' sheet where teachers post a schedule or calendar, or 'help wanted' information in the staff room and teacher candidates sign up for particular activities

g. Coordinate EDUC 321 & 322 courses specifically designed to connect to field experiencesh. Design assignments connected to experiences in the school

Pre-Internship Expectations - Saskatchewan Urban Native Teacher Education Program (SUNTEP)
SUNTEP: EDST 213 Apply for EDST Placement (Survey will be available early Spring)

Use the Pre-Internship Suggested Activities checklist, to focus your observations and add evidence to your online TECC Competencies Professional Growth Plan (PGP), found on this page under Professional Growth Portfolio, as appropriate. In terms of lesson planning and delivery, follow these requirements:

  • Co-plan and co-deliver at least three lessons in your placement classroom:
    • Prepare written lesson plans and state the PGP sub goal related to how these lesson plans are an indicator of your learning.
    • Lesson plans should include:
      • curriculum outcomes and indicators
      • necessary resources
      • introduction/background building
      • teacher directed activities (modelling)
      • student directed activities (practice)
      • conclusion/reinforcement of the lesson
      • adaptations for students with exceptionalities
      • related assessment procedures
    • Teach the lessons and write reflections as part of your PGP.
    • Ask for informal feedback from a peer coach, faculty member or partner teacher.
  • When not acting as instructional leader in the classroom, be involved by assisting the teacher, tutoring individuals, and working with small groups
  • Create an opportunity to observe in an unfamiliar teaching area.
  • Complete any related coursework assignments in your partner school.
  • Complete coursework assignments in your partner school.
SUNTEP: EDST 303/304 (103) Apply for EDST Placement (Survey will be available early Spring)

Use the Pre-Internship Suggested Activities checklist, found on this page under Pre-Internship, to focus your observations and add evidence to your online TECC Competencies Professional Growth Plan (PGP), found on this page under Professional Growth Portfolio, as appropriate. In terms of lesson planning and delivery, follow these requirements:

  • Plan and teach a series of three to five sequential lessons per week to a large group (same class):
    • Prepare written lesson plans and state the PGP sub goal related to how these lesson plans are an indicator of your learning.
    • Lesson plans should include:
      • curriculum outcomes and indicators
      • necessary resources
      • introduction/background building
      • teacher directed activities (modelling)
      • student directed activities (practice)
      • conclusion/reinforcement of the lesson
      •  adaptations for students with exceptionalities
      •  related assessment procedures
    • These lessons may be planned and/or implemented individually or with the co-operating teacher or colleague.
    • Elicit feedback from a peer coach or co-operating teacher and record examples of "evidence" and "reflections" on your lessons as part of your online PGP.
    • Discuss lesson feedback together in a post-conference.
  • When not acting as instructional leader in the classroom, be involved by assisting the teacher, tutoring individuals, and working with small groups.
  • Create an opportunity to observe/assist in an unfamiliar teaching area.
  • Complete any related coursework assignments in your partner school.
Pre-Internship Expectations - Bachelor of Music / Bachelor of Education (B.MUS/B.Ed)
BEd /B.Mus - EDST 420/427 Apply for EDST Placement (Survey will be available early Spring)

Field experiences for years one through three are administered through the Music Department. Year four field experiences are two full-time weeks that include the following:

Week One:

Use the Pre-Internship Suggested Activities checklist, to focus your observations and add evidence to your online TECC Competencies Professional Growth Plan (PGP), found on this page under Professional Growth Portfolio, as appropriate. In terms of lesson planning and delivery, follow these requirements:

  • Co-plan and co-deliver at least three lessons in your placement classroom:
    • Prepare written lesson plans and state the PGP sub goal related to how these lesson plans are an indicator of your learning.
    • Lesson plans should include:
      • curriculum outcomes and indicators
      • necessary resources
      • introduction/background building
      • teacher directed activities (modelling)
      • student directed activities (practice)
      • conclusion/reinforcement of the lesson
      • adaptations for students with exceptionalities
      • related assessment procedures
  • Teach the lessons and write reflections as part of your PGP.
  • Ask for informal feedback from a peer coach, faculty member or partner teacher.
  • When not acting as instructional leader in the classroom, be involved by assisting the teacher, tutoring individuals, and working with small groups
  • Create an opportunity to observe/assist in an unfamiliar teaching area.
  • Complete any related coursework assignments in your partner school.
Week Two:

Use the Pre-Internship Suggested Activities checklist, found on this page under Pre-Internship, to focus your observations and add evidence to your online TECC Competencies Professional Growth Plan (PGP), found on this page under Professional Growth Portfolio, as appropriate. In terms of lesson planning and delivery, follow these requirements:

  • Plan and teach a series of three to five sequential lessons this week to a large group (same class):
    • Prepare written lesson plans and state the PGP sub goal related to how these lesson plans are an indicator of your learning.
    • Lesson plans should include:
      • curriculum outcomes and indicators
      • necessary resources
      • introduction/background building
      • teacher directed activities (modelling)
      • student directed activities (practice)
      • conclusion/reinforcement of the lesson
      •  adaptations for students with exceptionalities
      •  related assessment procedures
    • These lessons may be planned and/or implemented individually or with the co-operating teacher or colleague.
    • Elicit feedback from a peer coach or co-operating teacher and record examples of "evidence" and "reflections" on your lessons as part of your online PGP.
    • Discuss lesson feedback together in a post-conference.
  • When not acting as instructional leader in the classroom, be involved by assisting the teacher, tutoring individuals, and working with small groups.
  • Create an opportunity to observe/assist in an unfamiliar teaching area.
  • Complete any related coursework assignments in your partner school.
Pre-Internship Expectations - Bachelor of Education Sequential Program
EDUC 321.3 (two days per week, term one)

Use the Pre-Internship Suggested Activities checklist, found on this page under Pre-Internship, to focus your observations and add evidence to your online TECC Competencies Professional Growth Plan (PGP), found on this page under Professional Growth Portfolio, as appropriate. In terms of lesson planning and delivery, follow these requirements:

  • Co-plan and co-deliver at least three lessons in your placement classroom:
    • Prepare written lesson plans and state the PGP sub goal related to how these lesson plans are an indicator of your learning.
    • Lesson plans should include:
      • curriculum outcomes and indicators
      • necessary resources
      • introduction/background building
      • teacher directed activities (modelling)
      • student directed activities (practice)
      • conclusion/reinforcement of the lesson
      •  adaptations for students with exceptionalities
      •  related assessment procedures
    • Teach the lessons and write reflections as part of your PGP.
    • Ask for informal feedback from a peer coach, faculty member or partner teacher.
  • When not acting as instructional leader in the classroom, be involved by assisting the teacher, tutoring individuals, and working with small groups
  • Create an opportunity to observe in an unfamiliar teaching area.
  • Complete any related coursework assignments in your partner school.
EDUC 322.3 (two days per week & full time week, term two)

Use the Pre-Internship Suggested Activities checklist, found on this page under Pre-Internship, to focus your observations and add evidence to your online TECC Competencies Professional Growth Plan (PGP), found on this page under Professional Growth Portfolio, as appropriate. In terms of lesson planning and delivery, follow these requirements:

  • Plan and teach weekly lessons throughout the term to a large group (same class); plan and teach sequential lessons each day during full time week in March
    • Prepare written lesson plans and state the PGP sub goal related to how these lesson plans are an indicator of your learning.
    • Lesson plans should include:
      • curriculum outcomes and indicators
      • necessary resources
      • introduction/background building
      • teacher directed activities (modelling)
      • student directed activities (practice)
      • conclusion/reinforcement of the lesson
      •  adaptations for students with exceptionalities
      •  related assessment procedures
    • These lessons may be planned and/or implemented individually or with the co-operating teacher or colleague.
    • Elicit feedback from a peer coach or co-operating teacher and record examples of "evidence" and "reflections" on your lessons as part of your online PGP.
    • Discuss lesson feedback together in a post-conference.
  • When not acting as instructional leader in the classroom, be involved by assisting the teacher, tutoring individuals, and working with small groups.
  • Create an opportunity to observe/assist in an unfamiliar teaching area.
  • Complete any related coursework assignments in your partner school.

Download Suggested Activities List

Some Suggested Activities for Pre-Internship Field Study:         

  Get to know students

  • Record observations about individual and group particularities (including patterns related to age, gender, learning abilities, interests/hobbies, apparent learning styles, apparent cultural/ethnic/racial/backgrounds, apparent socio-economic class, etc.)

Get to know the community

  • Walk with a colleague around the community close to the school,
  • Write a brief description of what is seen, heard, etc. (photo can be taken)
  • Look at the community as a resource for students of the school - jot down ideas for local field explorations

Get to know the school

  • The physical and social organization of the school
  • Manner in which students interact with each other and the staff
  • Patterns in how school life is organized

Observe learning activities in several classrooms and subject areas.

  • Describe some particularities about the students in the classrooms, as well as the physical environment and materials in the classroom
  • Describe opportunities for students to learn formally and informally in the classroom, in the school and in the community

Discuss assessment and evaluation practices with a teacher

Work with individual students (with advice/approval from a teacher)

  • Work with an individual student who needs extra support (e.g. read to a primary-aged student, listen to a student read, or help with assigned tasks at the secondary level)
  • Carry out more intensive individual tutorial work under the supervision of a cooperating teacher or faculty team (e.g., a teacher/faculty member may request development of a learning profile for individual students in particular subject areas)
  • Work with small groups of students in centres or workshop settings (e.g., help a group of students with literacy tasks while their teacher is carrying out a guided reading lesson, or help with science or social studies centres or labs)
  • Help prepare materials for the classroom and/or find resources that represent Aboriginal and multicultural perspectives
  • Help prepare materials for the classroom and/or find resources that represent Aboriginal and multicultural perspectives

Assist a learner for whom English is an additional language in developing cultural background knowledge (e.g.,  by engaging in conversations during short walks around the school or community and helping with assignments)

Carry out interest inventories with students to provide useful information to the teacher as s/he chooses reading materials

Help plan ways of infusing Aboriginal and multicultural content and perspectives into lesson and unit plans

Plan and implement a small group activity, using a lesson plan format

  • Write a reflection about this and/or ask a peer coach to respond to your plan and implementation of it
  • Small group lessons may be part of an assignment such as a 'mini-unit' or centre activity

Team-teach lessons with a peer colleague or cooperating teacher for a whole class.

  • Plan, implement, and write a reflection with your colleague
  • Elicit feedback (oral or written) as evidence for progress toward PGP goals/outcomes from a peer coach, faculty member or cooperating teacher

Teach a series of connected lessons to a large group (whole class) by the end of the second term

  • Elicit written feedback as evidence for progress toward PGP goals/outcomes from a peer coach, faculty member or cooperating teacher

Share particular strengths or skill set with partner school staff (e.g., experience with particular computer program or information technology could be shared to complement a teacher-designed lesson or unit)

Work as junior colleagues with partner school teachers - they will be interested in new ideas and strategies

Arrange an opportunity to observe learning in an unfamiliar teaching area (e.g., if physics is Teaching Area One compare the language and ways of knowing across physics and chemistry, history or biology; explore how to infuse Aboriginal and multicultural perspectives and ways of knowing across subject areas)

Take advantage of professional development opportunities offered through the school or school division

Share professional reading materials from on-campus studies (e.g., establish or participate in a reading circle or discussion group with teachers and teacher candidates in your school)

Internship

Internship is a period of extended and intensive field study experience. Interns cannot receive credit for a university course taken during the internship and should take a leave of absence from other employment during the time period. Outside work does not excuse interns from internship requirements. Should outside work prevent interns from meeting expectations, it could contribute to calibration and possibly a withdrawal from internship. Placements for internship occur within the province without preference given to particular urban locations except in very special circumstances (with financial responsibilities not considered as a substantive rationale for exceptions).

Interns will be placed in a school for sixteen weeks possibly with a cluster of other interns and their cooperating teachers, where they will work closely with cooperating teacher(s) and internship facilitator.

During this field study experience, interns are expected to develop beginning-teacher professional competencies through working with their cooperating teacher(s) to help grade school students learn.

This collaborative work is intended to be holistic in nature, meaning that interns are encouraged to focus on finding a balance in their intellectual, physical, emotional and spiritual well-being when choosing and setting professional goals and in meeting the goals of the program.

Cooperating teachers and internship facilitators will serve as trusted advisors and 'critical friends' who listen, support and help to analyze and solve problems.

When possible, clusters of interns and cooperating teachers can form a Professional Learning Community (PLC) in the school, which can also serve as an advisory group working together to enhance student learning.

U of S Academic Schedule and College of Education Dates

Developmental TimeLine of 16-week Internship

Download PDF version

************ Post this timeline where you can see it to guide you during your internship ***************
Weeks 1-2
Weeks 3-4
Weeks 5-6

Week 1:

-Be involved with the school year start-up.

-Build relationships with your partner teacher. Discuss the timeline, conferencing schedule, lesson/units plans submissions.

-Record important school and division dates and ensure partner teacher has any college in-service dates and material necessary.

-Share with partner teacher your eportfolio.

Week 2 :

-Develop & implement one lesson per day. It is can also be co-teaching a lesson.

-Make sure your PGP is up to date

**Start date of students may vary this week.

Week 3:

-Implement 1-2 lessons per day.

-Make sure to be involved in a variety of environments in your school – e.g., to work with students and teachers in other classrooms, extra-curricular, special events.

Week 4:

 -UBD unit must be provided to facilitator for review and at least two weeks prior to teaching it.

-Begin arranging experiences in a variety of environments in you school – e.g., to work with students and teachers in other classrooms Make sure your PGP is up to date

Week 5:

-Take over at least half of the instructional duties of your partner teacher. (Can start as early as Week 5 but by Week 7)

Week 6:

 -Half-time teaching continues or can start now.

-Work on 2nd UBD unit in order to submit to facilitator by week 9 and must be two weeks prior to implementing in classroom.

-Ensure your PGP is up to date.

-Organize evidence in eportfolio in preparation to complete midterm.
Weeks 7-8
Weeks 9-12
Weeks 13-16

Week 7:

-Full time teaching can start now but can start as late as Week 9.

-Full time teaching is at least 5 weeks.

Week 8:

-Using your PGP, complete the Midterm assessment with your partner teacher. Midterm should not be completed before Week 8.

-Submit midterm assessment to your internship facilitator by the end of Week 9.

Week 9:

-Teaching full-time must start this week if it hasn’t already.

-Submit UBD to facilitator for review and Midterm assessment.

Week 10 & 11

-Full time teaching continues.

-Ensure PGP via eportfolio is up to date.

Week 12

You can begin decreasing teaching to half-time (if Full-time started Week 7)

Week 13 & 14:

-Visit special areas, other classrooms/schools.

-Gradual release of classes but not all.

-Make sure your PGP is up to date

Week 15: Using your PGP, complete the final assessment with your partner teacher and send it to your internship facilitator for feedback. Have extra copies signed for your records.

Week 16: Final Assessments are signed by teacher, principal, and intern so facilitator can sign up & pick up. Enjoy the final days of your internship!
Intern Orientation Session

Internship begins with a mandatory full-day orientation session for interns in mid-August. The main purpose of the orientation is for interns to garner necessary information about their professional responsibilities. In addition, interns will meet with the internship facilitator with whom they will work and begin to build their professional relationship, using this time to clarify expectations, do some goal-setting and some planning together.

In-service Sessions

The scheduled in-service sessions are designed to support professional growth for both interns and cooperating teachers, and to deal with issues, ideas and concerns that emerge as the term progresses. During the extended practicum period, internship facilitators will offer one formal in-service involving both cooperating teachers and interns and one formal in-service for interns only. The day-long in-service sessions will be held locations central to a cluster of schools in the territory of the internship facilitator.

In-service sessions will involve further goal setting and sharing ideas for evidence gathering and for analyzing and reflecting upon interns' experiences recorded in the Professional Growth Portfolio. Internship facilitators can also take into account questions, topics and issues raised by interns and cooperating teachers when planning in-service sessions. Potential topics include:

  • peer coaching
  • constructivist teaching and learning
  • assessment 'for', 'of', and 'as' learning
  • student engagement
  • subject specific methodologies
  • planning across subject areas (subject area integration)
  • working with revised curricula
  • infusing First Nations, Métis, Inuit and multicultural perspectives and content into student learning opportunities
  • Inquiry Approaches

Interns are responsible for:

  • Embracing opportunities to learn from and in field study experiences
    • learn about learners (e.g., through observation, small group facilitation)
    • support teachers in meeting the needs of students in the school
    • be flexible and sensitive in adapting to the school and community contexts
    • plan/co-plan and implement individual lessons and team-teach with the cooperating teacher
    • forgo enrolment in university courses and take a leave of absence from employment
  • Embracing opportunities for broad based experiences:
    • participate in classrooms at different grade levels and across subject areas as much as possible
    • engage in all aspects of the life of the school, including extra-curricular activities and participation in professional development opportunities
  • Embracing opportunities for professional conversations:
    • schedule daily conferences with cooperating teachers throughout the internship
    • maintain an up-to-date PGP (including analysis of and reflections on evidence) and use this as a focus for discussions - ensure the PGP is made available to the cooperating teacher and internship facilitator
    • communicate with the cooperating teacher immediately when issues/concerns arise - then, consult with the internship facilitator.
  • Fulfilling logistical requirements
    • Complete and submit a Criminal Record Check before beginning the internship.
    • attend mandatory orientations and in-services scheduled by the College of Education
    • engage in professional conduct according to the STF Code of Ethics
    • adhere to the 16 Week Internship Developmental Timeline
    • inform the cooperating teacher and internship facilitator of absences as soon as possible and not later than 8:30 a.m. the day of the absence
  • Embracing opportunities to hone professional competencies
    • Prepare at least two original or substantially adapted formal unit plans of approximately 10 lessons each. Units should be created using the Understanding By Design Model
      • Feedback on these required units is to be provided by cooperating teachers/internship facilitators before implementation, share unit plans at least one week in advance of the planned implementation date.
        • co-generate the first unit due with the cooperating teacher
        • generate the second unit individually, after consultation with the cooperating teacher as to the unit focus.
        • At least one of these units must infuse First Nations, Métis, Inuit content and perspectives.
      • both units should
        • be directly connected to Saskatchewan curricula (addressing Broad Areas of Learning, Cross-curricular Competencies, outcomes/ indicators)
        • include specifically identified outcomes/indicators, assessment & evaluation plan a concept map, scope and sequence plan.
      • co-plan several other units/mini-units in preparation for full time teaching.
      • take over, full-time, the range of duties assigned to the cooperating teacher for at least five weeks (no less than 20 days of 'full-time' instruction)
  • Embracing experimentation and risk-taking
    • engage learners in inquiry approaches, problem-based learning and other student-centred learning opportunities
    • team-teach with cooperating teachers and other interns
    • participate in peer-coaching opportunities (if possible)
  • Adhering to Field Experiences Policy on Absenteeism
Absenteeism Policy

Interns must adhere to the policies of the school division in instances of absenteeism during the field experience. However, because interns are responsible to the College of Education, they must report ALL absences, regardless of the reason, to the Internship Facilitator, and also provide a note from their physician if absent for more than three days. There will also be a formal discussion with the co-operating teacher and the internship facilitator after an absence lasting 3 days or more. The internship facilitator may require the intern to make up the time, or under extreme circumstances, may require the intern to discontinue.

  • Independent Coaching and Student Transportation Policies
Involvement in Coaching

Interns should not be coaching independently of a supervising teaching who will also be involved in the coaching situation, and interns should not be independently driving kids to and from sporting events (or other school-related events).

Intern Checklist

Download in Word

Internship Checklist

_____ All prerequisites have been met for internship

_____ Check for online survey/application for internship (Field Experiences Website)

_____ Apply on-line for internship

_____ If choosing Saskatoon internship placement, provide Field Experiences with required documentation for special circumstances (requests accommodated where possible, however accommodating all requests may not be possible due to the complexities of the matching process)

_____ Criminal Record Check with vulnerable sector check

_____ Register for EXPR402.15

_____ Make arrangements to meet with your cooperating teacher

_____ Attend internship orientation

Each student must apply for a placement.

Cooperating Teachers are Responsible for:

Allowing opportunities to learn

  • afford interns opportunities to engage in observations of learners, small group facilitation, implementation of lesson plans and eventually a unit plan during the full time teaching block of five weeks.
  • provide the intern with up to one hour of preparation time each day prior to full-time teaching and some preparation time during the full-time teaching period
  • provide formal written feedback as 'evidence of progress' toward program goals/outcomes (interns gather this evidence to be part of their Professional Growth Portfolio [PGP])

Allow opportunities for broad based experiences:

  • multiple grade experiences
  • multiple subject area experiences
  • invite participation in extra-curricular events and PD opportunities (including participating with your intern in a College of Education sponsored in-service)

Allowing opportunities for professional conversations:

  • discuss core concepts, topics and time frames so the intern can begin planning his/her teaching responsibilities as early as possible in the internship
  • schedule regular and timely feedback during daily conferences
  • provide feedback on the intern's unit plans
  • development of at least two formal unit plans is expected
  • use the College of Education Program Goals & Outcomes and the Professional Growth Portfolio (PGP) as the basis for discussions

Encouraging "Learning/Learner Focused Supervision"

Allowing experimentation and risk-taking

  • endorse efforts to plan and implement inquiry approaches, problem-based learning and other student-centred learning opportunities
  • team-teach and co-generate unit(s) with the intern - participate with the intern scheduled in-services

Completing Internship Assessment forms (mid-term and final reports) with the intern.

  • accomplished collaboratively by several teachers and the intern
  • with provision of regular documentation in circumstances where the intern is experiencing difficulties
  • by communicating concerns to the intern first and, if necessary, to the internship facilitator if concerns cannot be resolved

Ensuring that the intern is not assigned duties as a certified or substitute teacher, a coach (except as an assistant), a sole supervisor of playgrounds, halls, dances or sports events, or a person responsible for transportation of students.

Cooperating Teachers must Apply for an Intern - Please check for the most current application.

Internship Facilitators are responsible for:

Collaborating with interns and cooperating teachers to enhance student learning

  • Upon request can help establish PLCs with cooperating teachers and interns who work together to enhancing student learning (collaborative work could be connected to school Learning Improvement Plans)

Visiting cooperating teachers and interns in extended practicum settings

  • support and enhance the working relationship between interns and cooperating teachers
  • facilitate cooperating teachers in understanding learning focused supervision
  • provide feedback on intern's unit plans
  • provide written feedback (in electronic form) to interns as evidence for PGP for at least two formal observation visits
  • schedule extra visits/formal observations if extra support is necessary to aid an intern's ongoing development

Maintaining communication with interns and cooperating teachers using telephone and electronic mail

Planning and implementing in-service opportunities for cooperating teachers and interns

Monitoring the Professional Growth Portfolio (PGP) with interns and assist if difficulties in recording evidence and analysis/reflections arise - suggest actions to attain PGP goals/outcomes

Assist in formulating mid-term and final internship evaluation reports for each intern and collect the final evaluations.

  • consult with the College of Education Programs Office staff and College of Education faculty when difficulties or concerns arise
  • assist in completing a Calibration form and/or Contract for Improvement when difficulties have not been resolved
  • meet with the intern, cooperating teacher(s) and principal to complete an Internship Withdrawal Form if difficulties are not resolved and the intern must leave the placement

Assessment and Evaluation in Internship: The Professional Growth Portfolio and Required Reports

The Professional Growth Portfolio

During internship, assessment and evaluation of professional growth will be continuous.

Interns are expected to continue to collect and analyze evidence of professional growth using the Professional Growth Portfolio (PGP).

  • Formal written feedback from cooperating teacher(s) (daily, if possible) and from formal visits by internship facilitator should be included as 'evidence' of professional growth in the PGP.
  • Other materials to be gathered as evidence include lesson plans, self-evaluations, peer feedback, and can include (with permission) photos, video clips and examples of work collected from students.

Evidence of progress toward achieving program goals and outcomes, along with developing professional competencies, will be regularly discussed with the cooperating teacher and during visits with the internship facilitator.

On a weekly or bi-weekly basis, interns are expected to identify and discuss with cooperating teachers one or more particular program goals/outcomes for focused attention and should identify some necessary action(s) to provide evidence of growth.

Because feedback and reflection are required for professional development, pre- and post-conferencing are very important and jot notes from these professional conversations can be included in the PGP.

When possible, a cluster of interns in a school can provide feedback for one another during peer coaching opportunities. Jot notes or more formal written feedback from these opportunities can also be included as evidence in the PGP.

At the midpoint of internship, interns and cooperating teachers, with the support of internship facilitators, will write a formative 'mid-term' report evaluating the interns' progress towards program goals and outcomes using evidence, analysis and reflections collected in the PGP.

At the end of internship, a final evaluation is completed. The final evaluation report indicates that the intern has successfully completed the requirements of the intensive field experience. The final report is also completed by cooperating teachers and interns, in consultation with internship facilitators.

Release time (a half day for writing the mid-term report and another half-day for writing the final report) is provided for cooperating teachers and interns. Cooperating teachers are responsible for selecting the half day and for ensuring completion of the final report in a timely fashion for collection by the internship facilitator during the final days of internship.

The official final evaluation report must be signed by cooperating teacher(s), the intern, the school principal and the internship facilitator.

When the final evaluation report has been signed by all persons, changes cannot be made to the document.

After collecting final evaluation reports, internship facilitators submit these to the College of Education Programs Office and grades - that is, either a 'P' (Pass), a 'W' (Withdrawn), or an 'F' (Fail) will be entered on transcripts.

Cooperating teachers and internship facilitators must systematically provide support for an intern experiencing difficulty. When the regular cycle of action-feedback-action is not successful, it is extremely important to be candid and frank about the difficulties and to work out the situation. It is important to specifically identify any particular difficulties the intern may be experiencing within these areas as soon as they arise, so that these problems can be collaboratively addressed as soon as possible.

process to follow diagram

When the intern experiences difficulties that are not being remedied through daily feedback conversations involving 'coaching', 'collaborating' or 'consulting', the cooperating teacher should initiate the next level in the Learning-Focused Supervision model, which is 'calibrating'. In this provision of formal support the cooperating teacher and the intern, with help from the internship facilitator, complete the document titled Calibrating Learning-Focused Supervision and implement the suggested solutions.

If the situation does not improve within a short time frame, a Contract for Improvement should be developed specifying the reasons for concern. These particular expectations for improvement should be supported and provided by the cooperating teacher and by the internship facilitator. The Contract for Improvement must be signed by the intern, cooperating teacher and the internship facilitator.

If the Contract does not catalyze an improvement, then withdrawal from internship may occur. (Internship Withdrawal Form)

Over ninety-five percent of those who begin the intensive field experience complete it successfully. Nevertheless, interns may be required to withdraw from the intensive field experience if they are

  • experiencing difficulties that are detracting from the learning of students in the classroom,
  • demonstrating unprofessional behaviour
  • experiencing difficulty of any kind which seriously detracts from an acceptable performance or competency development

Cooperating teachers and the internship facilitator must be thorough in documenting reasons for the withdrawal.

An Internship Withdrawal Form should be completed during a meeting that includes the intern, cooperating teacher(s), the internship facilitator and (if possible) the principal of the school so that all stakeholders have a voice.

The Internship Withdrawal Form must be filled out and signed by all parties.

Once the Internship Withdrawal Form is complete, the intern should meet with Field Experience personnel immediately to discuss a plan for a subsequent internship. Interns who withdraw prior to the withdrawal deadline set by the University (usually mid-November) will be assigned a W. Thereafter, the mark assigned is WF or F, depending on the circumstances. An intern withdrawing after the deadline under extenuating circumstances may be assigned a W.

Interns who receive a W, WF, or F will consult with Field Experience personnel in the Programs Office and, based on the specified reasons for withdrawal indicated on the Internship Withdrawal Form, the intern will be apprised of the conditions attached to re-entry into internship.

Interns who receive a W, WF or F during their first internship experience must submit an application to the Student Affairs and Academic Standards Committee (SAASC) requesting a second internship placement.

Prior to submitting the application, the intern must again meet with Field Experience personnel in Programs Office who will consult to determine if all conditions attached to re-entry have been met.

Interns who repeatedly withdraw or are withdrawn from internship can be required by the Student Affairs and Academic Standards Committee to discontinue their studies.

Appeal Procedures

If an intern is not satisfied with the grade decision, an appeal can be made through the University appeal process. This is covered in the Student Appeals in Academic Matters (November 2000) publication available on the University website. See Section III: Substantive Academic Judgment of Nonwritten Course Work. The appeal is initiated with the Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Programs and Research, using Form A from the aforementioned document. A fee is assessed for appeals. It is refunded if the appeal is successful.

Interns must adhere to the policies of the school division in instances of absenteeism during the field experience. However, because interns are responsible to the College of Education, they must report ALL absences, regardless of the reason, to the Internship Facilitator, and also provide a note from their physician if absent for more than three days. There will also be a formal discussion with the co-operating teacher and the internship facilitator after an absence lasting 3 days or more. The internship facilitator may require the intern to make up the time, or under extreme circumstances, may require the intern to discontinue.

Bates Award

The Bates Award for Excellence in Student Teaching is a prestigious award received by meritorious undergraduate students in the College of Education at the University of Saskatchewan in their final term of study. The Award is annually presented to teacher candidates who have demonstrated educational excellence; innovation; a high degree of impact upon their fellow students, students in school, or the community; and academic achievement while members of the College community. Teacher candidates may be independently nominated by faculty, or solicit support for their nomination from faculty, to be considered for the Award.

All recommendation letters and any other documentation can be forwarded to Dianne Sander (dianne.sander@usask.ca) in the Programs Office.

How to Apply for the Bates Award

Criminal Occurrence Security Check / Criminal Record Check

MANDATORY Criminal Occurrence Security Checks / Criminal Record Checks (COSC/CRC), with the additional requirement of the vulnerable sector check,  are mandatory for ALL Teacher Candidates.

DSS Accommodation Plan

The Field Experiences accommodation plan at the College of Education has been developed to support students during their Field Experiences courses (student teaching and internship) who are registered with DSS. It is an extension from the plan developed by DSS and focuses on accommodating teacher candidates they are in the schools.

Please make an appointment with the Field Experience team to develop your plan. It is beneficial to make an appointment prior to your field experience course so the accommodation is completed before your time in the schools.

Please contact one of the following to set up an appointment:

Kathy-Pryor Hildebrandt
306-966-7667
kathy.pryor-hildebrandt@usask.ca.
Melanie Wilkinson
306-966-2632
melanie.wilkinson@usask.ca

Teacher Education programs are responsible to society for providing courses of study that support Teacher Candidates (including student teachers and interns) in developing the professional, knowledge, instructional, and curricular competencies necessary for provincial teacher certification as well as to support best practices for teaching and learning in a changing world. 

The College of Education welcomes diversity, as well as teamwork towards appropriate supports, in order that Teacher Candidates will demonstrate the necessary Teaching Competencies identified by Saskatchewan’s Teacher Education, Classification and Certification Board (Appendix A). Competency standards for teachers are described further in the document Teacher Professionalism: A Public Trust (www.stf.sk.ca).

The College of Education has identified Essential Skills that are necessary in order for teacher candidates to demonstrate teaching-related competencies. Essential skills are professional abilities that exemplify necessary demonstrated behaviours related to particular competency standards. These skills include: cognitive, communication, emotional and physical health, language, research/information processing and social skills.

  • advocacy towards reasonable accommodation supporting academic standards and requirements;
  • personal responsibility in needs’ identification and timely communication about support requests;
  •  foundations of equity that underpins inclusive education in schools while at the same time upholds teacher competencies as required outcomes.

A request for accommodation for disability begins with communication from the student to Disability Student Services (DSS) and is subject to the applicable policies, regulations and procedures of both the University of Saskatchewan and the Faculty of Education. Students are strongly encouraged to seek out and review:

Teacher Candidates with Disabilities: Field Experience Policies and Practices

An Accommodation Planning Committee will be formed at the Teacher Candidate’s request to develop an Accommodation Plan for field experiences (student teaching and/or internship).  Membership of the committee will typically include: the Teacher Candidate, the Field Experience Coordinator, and a representative from DSS. 

Requests including on-site accommodation associated with physical environment, devices/adaptive technology, time extensions, or other approved adaptations related to program completion are considered on a case-by-case basis according to the applicable policies, regulations, and procedures. Accommodation is intended to support teacher candidates’ responsibilities in developing and demonstrating the related teacher competencies required of all students for convocation and certification in the profession (see attached College of Education Accountability Statement and Ministry of Education Certification Competencies for further information).

A candidate for a B.Ed. degree must demonstrate the following:  

1. Cognitive Skills

A teacher candidate must demonstrate the memory necessary to recall, integrate and synthesize information. In addition, the teacher candidate must display both critical and creative thinking skills, with the latter involving fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration in terms of developing and adapting student programs.
2. Communication Skills

A teacher candidate must speak and hear (independently or through successful use of augmentative/alternative communication (AAC) and interact with students in order to effectively and efficiently deliver and assess lessons. In addition, clear oral and written communication skills are required related to family engagement as well as working relationships with colleagues.

3. Emotional and Physical Health

A teacher candidate must successfully navigate through the emotional and physical expectations of a school day related to practica experiences and demonstrate attendance and participation as required and/or negotiated in College and field settings.

4. Language Skills

A teacher candidate must demonstrate proficiency in the language of instruction (oral and written).

5. Research/Information Processing Skills

A teacher candidate must demonstrate the ability to initiate and complete the collection of data related to students and curricula, effectively demonstrating analysis, considering implications, keeping records, and displaying information.

6. Social Skills

A teacher candidate must be able to ethically and sensitively build working relationships with all members of a school team. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills and internal motivation are all personal qualities that successful teachers demonstrate and are attributes expected of students in the College of Education.

College of Education policy is aligned with the University of Saskatchewan’s Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disability Policy:

Disability Services for Students

Students with Disabilities: Academic Accommodation and Access

Accommodations for Education students also align with guiding principles from the Duty to Accommodate document prepared by the Saskatchewan School Boards Association (SSBA) and the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation (STF) including considerations of responsiveness, fairness and equity, shared responsibility and respectful communication.

http://www.saskschoolboards.ca/employeerelations/resourceguides/Apr13_DutytoAccommodate_Guide_SSBA_STF.pdf

1.      Principles

1.1.  The Principles of Duty to Accommodate rest on a mission statement of fostering an accessible and welcoming campus including, by extension, field experiences/practica settings.

1.1.1. Duty to Accommodate is a legal obligation informed by The Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission. While the SHRC does not detail how the accommodation process will take place, the obligation to accommodate exists between the university and the student.   

1.1.2. The university has the legal obligation to provide educational services in a non-discriminatory manner and to investigate what can be done to accommodate the identified medical restrictions of the student.

1.1.3. Accommodation does not require that the institution lower academic or non-academic standards to accommodate students with disabilities nor does it relieve the student of their responsibility to develop the essential skills and competencies expected of all students in the program/college.

1.1.4. “The university will take all measures short of undue hardship to the University to ensure that students with disabilities have access to the University and the opportunity to succeed in their programs of study…In some circumstances, the nature and degree of a disability may mean that no reasonable accommodation would enable an individual to perform the essential requirements of a course/program…Where no reasonable accommodation can be provided, the University may refuse admission or accommodations in order to preserve the academic integrity (meaning the essential requirements) of a course/program” (Students with Disabilities: Academic Accommodation and Access, U of S, 2011, p. 2).

2.     Scope

2.1  This policy applies to all students with disabilities, determined by DSS to qualify for accommodations, enrolled in the College of Education. Its implementation is the responsibility of all members of the Education community, including students, support staff, faculty, instructional staff, and staff at partner schools, and supported by the College leadership team. The College of Education is committed to meeting the requirements of this policy.

3.     Non-compliance

3.1   Following due process, the University may take one or more of the following actions against anyone whose activities are in violation of any applicable legislation or of this policy:

3.1.1 In the case of students, this may involve disciplinary action under the Regulations for Student Academic Misconduct and/or Standard of Student Conduct in Non-Academic Matters and Procedures for Resolution of Complaints and Appeals.

3.1.2 In the case of employees, disciplinary action in accordance with the applicable collective agreement(s), up to and including termination, may be applied.

(see Students with Disabilities: Academic Accommodation and Access)

4.      Procedures

4.1.  Responsiveness

4.1.1. Discussions around the duty to accommodate students with disabilities should be ongoing, evolving and collaborative. Support teams could include administrators, faculty, other instructors, staff, practicum and coop partners, with discussions prior to, and during, the practicum experience upon prior approval from teacher candidate.

4.2.  Fairness and Equity

4.2.1. The uniqueness of disabilities supports the necessity of a case-by-case approach. This will require a commitment by all parties to provide accommodation and the flexibility by all parties working with the student to overcome any potential discriminatory effect.

4.3.  Shared Responsibility

4.3.1. The provision for the accommodation process requires interdependent yet distinct responsibilities on the part of the student, Disability Services for Students, the College, faculty, staff, department heads, educational partners, and medical practitioners.                 

4.3.2 Communication with students related to accommodations processes and related expectations will occur through the Student Accommodation Handbook, posted on  the  College website, in addition to standard advising processes. Information related to  Accommodations planning will be presented to incoming students.

4.3.3 Once a student has communicated to the Field Experiences Co-ordinator information regarding registration with DSS and the subsequent need for accommodations related to upcoming student teaching or internship experiences, the Field Experience Co-ordinator or Field Officer should arrange a meeting with the student and DSS as soon as possible to complete the Teacher Candidate Accommodation Plan for Field Experiences (see Appendix B). This is an evergreen document, designed for ongoing changes by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate) or designate, and available on the College website.

4.4  Respectful Communication

4.4.1 Respectful communication is underpinned by ethical behavior and professionalism.

4.4.2 Confidentiality related to medical documentation is supported through Disability Student Services (DSS) receiving and storing any related documents provided directly by the student; the College of Education is not responsible for collecting and storing medical documentation.

4.4.3 Timely provision of documentation by the student is required in order that processes for accommodation can be put into effect.

4.5  Responsibility for this policy rests with Dean (or Dean’s designate).

Appendix A

Saskatchewan Teacher Education, Classification and Certification (TECC) Goals and Competencies

The Successful Teacher Candidate will

Goal 1: demonstrate professional (personal) competencies including:

  • the ability to maintain respectful, mutually supportive and equitable professional relationships with learners, colleagues, families and communities
  • ethical behavior and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners
  • a commitment to social justice and the capacity to nurture an inclusive and equitable environment for the empowerment of all learners
  • a commitment to service and the capacity to be reflective, lifelong learner and inquirer by taking the initiative in asking questions, searching out resources, and creating opportunities to learn from colleagues and others

Goal 2: demonstrate knowledge competencies including:

  • knowledge of Canadian History, especially in reference to Saskatchewan and Western Canada
  • proficiency in the Language of Instruction
  • knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit Culture and History (e.g. Treaties, Residential School, Scrip and Worldview)
  • ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately
  • knowledge of a number of subjects taught in Saskatchewan schools (disciplinary/interdisciplinary knowledge)
  • ability to strive for/pursue new knowledge

Goal 3: demonstrate instructional competencies including:

  • the ability to utilize meaningful, equitable and holistic approaches to assessment and evaluation
  • the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings

Goal 4: demonstrate curricular competencies including:

  • knowledge of Saskatchewan curriculum and policy documents and applies this understanding to plan lessons, units of study and year plans using curriculum outcomes as outlined by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Education
  • the ability to incorporate First Nations, Metis and Inuit knowledge, content and perspective into all teaching areas
  • the capacity to engage in program planning to shape ‘lived curriculum’ that brings learner needs, subject matter, and  contextual variables together in developmentally appropriate, culturally responsive and meaningful ways

Teacher Candidate Accommodation Plan for Field Experiences

Download as Word document

Date:___________  Name: _______________________________________________________

Student Number:_________________   Phone: __________________   PAWS email: ________

Program:  Elementary________ Secondary ____________ 

ITEP ____________Music ___________Sequential _________ SUNTEP_______________

1st Teaching Area________________________ 2nd Teaching Area ________________________

Field Experience Course(s) for which accommodations will apply: (specify course numbers of internship or other field experiences courses): _______________________________________

Supports for students in the College of Education are encouraged on the foundation of equity that underpins inclusive education in schools while at the same time upholds teacher competencies as required outcomes.

Teacher Candidates with disabilities who anticipate they may need reasonable accommodation in order to meet the required standards of essential skills are responsible for registering with Disability Student Services (DSS) as soon as possible (if possible, prior to the target school year).  Once registered with DSS , an Accommodation Planning Committee will be formed at the Teacher Candidate’s request to develop an Accommodation Plan.  The membership of the committee will include: the Teacher Candidate, the Field Experience Coordinator as the Associate Dean (Undergraduate) or Dean’s designate, and a representative from DSS. 

Requests including on-site accommodation associated with physical environment, devices/adaptive technology, time extensions, or other approved adaptations related to program completion are considered on a case-by-case basis according to the applicable policies, regulations, and procedures. Accommodation is intended to support teacher candidates’ responsibilities in developing and demonstrating the related teacher competencies required of all students for convocation and certification in the profession (see attached College of Education Accountability Statement and Ministry of Education Certification Competencies for further information).

Essential Skill

Part A.

Identify Specific Need (s) ***confidential diagnoses not included here

Part B.(may require additional meeting to complete)

Accommodation Plan

Part C.

Implementation Plan (as necessary)/Other info

1. Cognitive Skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Communication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Emotional and Physical Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Language Skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Research/Information Processing Skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Social Skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow-Up Meeting Plan (if necessary)

Date:

Time:

Location:

Attendees:


Signatures (below) confirm that the Teacher Candidate Accommodation Plan has been reviewed and confirmed by all members of the Accommodations Planning Committee.

Date: ____________________

Student: ____________________________ (Printed Name)  

Signature: ___________________________________________________

College Associate Dean or Designate_________________________________ (Printed Name)   

Signature:___________________________________________

DSS Advisor:_____________________________________________ (Printed Name)

Signature: _________________________________________

This Accommodation Plan is the property of the teacher candidate who is responsible to provide this plan, as appropriate, to the following team members:  internship facilitators, cohort

co-ordinators, and partner school teachers and administrators. Consultation with other school Division Personnel is recommended as appropriate.

Please contact one of the following to set up an appointment:

Kathy-Pryor Hildebrandt
306-966-7667
kathy.pryor-hildebrandt@usask.ca.
Melanie Wilkinson
306-966-2632
melanie.wilkinson@usask.ca

Professional Accountability

Students in the College of Education aspire to high standards of professional practice and ethical conduct. Procedures for students with academic program concerns are designed to honour core principles of respect, inclusivity, integrity, and responsibility.

Tools and Resources

The Field Experience Tools and Resources section includes files on Supervision Facilitation, Observation Skills, Infusion of First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspectives, Peer Coaching, Lesson and Unit Plans as well as Prep Tips for Interns.

Contact Us

College of Education
28 Campus Drive, University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 0X1

(306) 966-7665
education.internship@usask.ca