*** New topics added August 22, 2017 ***

Culture


From Britain with Love: James Bond, the Cold War, and British Identity

Elyn Achtymichuk (Graduate Student)

Out of the rubble of World War II, the heroic figure of Bond rises to inspire and rejuvenate the British people in a time of social and political upheaval. This talk covers references to rationing, changing gender norms, and the global tensions of the Cold War. It can also be modified to focus on the relevance of James Bond films to present-day issues of gender and fear (longer presentations can begin with a screening).

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 minutes and up, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

Science and Story-Telling

Sandy Bonny (Instructor)

*currently oversubscribed - new engagements available in January or later*

I am a lecturer and program developer in the College of Arts and Science with an interdisciplinary background in creative writing and Earth science (PhD 2007), and an advocate for multi-vocal science teaching strategies that acknowledge cultural perspectives on science and the role of narrative in scientific thinking. I can present on these topics and/or facilitate group inquiry activities, depending on the interests of my audience.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 30-60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

The Language Centre and ESL/International Students

Lynn Bytyqi (Staff Member)

As an ESL teacher and student advisor at the Language Centre for 15 years, I’ve acquired a wealth of experience and knowledge worth sharing. I can present on the following topics: 1) an overview of the Language Centre, its programs, and students; 2) a cross-cultural understanding of ESL/international students, the challenges they face in educational contexts, and strategies to support them.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30-60 minutes, projector preferred, English or ESL audiences, Saskatoon)
 

Metis Rights in Canada

Larry Chartrand (Faculty Member)

*fully booked for the year; no more engagements available in 2017-2018*

This presentation is intended to help people learn about the Metis peoples of Canada. How did the Metis come into existence? How did the Metis deal with colonization and settlers? What rights are the Metis peoples claiming today? Who is Metis and what does it mean?

(suitable for any audience, 30 to 90 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Rethinking "Racism"

Roberta Desnomie (Graduate Student)

Racism is a controversial issue. Conversations about it are often shut down before they even begin. This discussion is focused on what “racism” really is, how it affects all of us, and what we can do to begin to have meaningful and productive conversations about it without shaming or blaming.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector/board preferred, English, Saskatoon)

Themes of Social Justice in World Religions

Heidi Epstein (Faculty Member)

This is a basic introduction to foundational ideals of social justice that many religious traditions have fostered from their very beginnings, but which lie outside public awareness and receive little attention in the media. Brief case studies from a variety of sacred texts and from contemporary religious social justice movements will be presented (e.g. from Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism).

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 to 120 minutes, projector required, English or French, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

*this speaker can also present critical perspectives on: religion and globalisation, religion and sexuality, the politics of sacred music, religion and romantic love, and women in religious traditions

What Is Islam?

Fachrizal Halim (Faculty Member)

Have you ever wondered what is happening to the Muslim communities across the globe nowadays? Are you interested in understanding the origins and development of Islam, its fundamental beliefs and practices, and its influence in defining Muslim cultures? This talk includes the historical development of Islamic ideas and institutions, and how Muslims have made sense of their life experiences by interpreting and re-interpreting Islam’s foundational ideas throughout time.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, requires projector and board, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

*this speaker is also willing to present on contemporary Islamic political movements, such as reactions to modernization and Westernization

Literary Topics on Jane Austen, Disability, and the Bible

Kathleen James-Cavan (Faculty Member)

I have expertise in the works of Jane Austen as well as films, videoblogs, and other spinoffs of her works in popular culture. I also research the topic of disability, both how it is experienced today and how it is represented in literature in English from 1700 onwards. Finally, I study the influence of theology on literature, and was recently ordained as a United Church minister.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon and area)

Myths of Mother Culture: Daniel Quinn's Perspectives

Kalpesh Joshi (Researcher)

Ishmael, the book which won the one-time Ted Turner fellowship in the year 1991, questions our role as a member of living community on Earth and thus also challenges the way we treat the world around us. The novel is in the form of prolonged dialogues between Ishmael – the unusual teacher – and his student, a young man in search of truth.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 90 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

Medieval Information Technology

Yin Liu (Faculty Member)

Many of the ways we store, process, and deliver written information were developed in the Middle Ages, between the years 500 and 1500. My research (http://medievalcodes.ca) explores the implications of medieval information design for the information and communications technologies we are developing today.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 90 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

On Success, Failure, Resilience, and Pushing Limits

Shawna Pandya (Alum)

I will share my stories of success and failure, and how that’s helped me build resilience. I know you can be hard on yourself in a way that is destructive… or a way that is constructive. I'll communicate the value of setting goals, taking steps to reach them, positive self talk and mental rehearsal, and self control.

(suitable for adults, 15 to 90 minutes, projector required, English or French, Prince Albert or other Saskatchewan locations)

*this speaker is also registered with the National Speakers Bureau

Continuing Anne of Green Gables: Serials, Sequels, and Adaptations

Wendy Roy (Faculty Member)

Throughout the past century, the popularity of L.M. Montgomery’s 1908 novel, Anne of Green Gables, has rested on its status as a continuing story. Depending on the interests of the audience, this illustrated talk will look at up to three forms of continuation: serialization in newspapers and magazines, sequels such as Anne of Avonlea, and adaptation into films and television series.

(suitable for Grades 5-8 and adults, 40 to 60 minutes, screen required, English, Saskatoon)

Race and Stereotypes: Understanding and Addressing Stereotypes in Canada

Scott Thompson (Faculty Member)

This talk addresses the questions of “what is race?” and “how do we address racial stereotypes?” It starts out by explaining how widely held ideas about “race” are not supported by scientific evidence, and then explains the history behind the term, and the (non-race) reasons why Europeans were able to conquer and colonize the world. Special attention is given to Settler / First Nations relations in Canada, and “Indian” stereotypes.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, range of possible lengths, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon and area)

A Perspective on Disability, Barriers and the Art of Non-Discrimination

Sarah Vermette (Staff Member)

Fear of the unknown often leads to discrimination and false perceptions that inhibit us from understanding other-abled people. Discover how to embrace compassion and non-judgement from someone who has experienced the trials and gifts of living with a disability.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 75 minutes, projector required, English or ASL, Saskatoon)

Science and Math


What Are Viruses and Why Do They Make Us Sick?

Arinjay Banerjee (Graduate Student)

*currently oversubscribed - new engagements available in January or later*

Viruses are really small particles that need to infect an individual to grow and spread. Some viruses make us sick and some do not. There are viruses that have been around for a while and there are new viruses that have recently emerged. Where do these new viruses come from? Why do these new viruses emerge? Why do new viruses often cause more severe disease? We will answer these classic questions together as we go over some historical viral diseases.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 or adults, 30 to 40 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon and area)

Why Does Earth's Climate Change?

Krystopher Chutko (Faculty Member)

Earth’s atmosphere is a dynamic system, constantly changing in both space and time. There is a tremendous amount of misunderstanding and misinformation about climate change. This talk will try to lay out our basic understanding of this issue, and whether we can do anything about it.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Science and Story-Telling

Sandy Bonny (Instructor)

*currently oversubscribed - new engagements available in January or later*

See entry under "culture" category.

450-Million-Year-Old Animals of Manitoba

Michael Cuggy (Instructor)

A number of places in Manitoba contain exceptional soft-bodied fossils. The animals preserved in these locations can teach us about the history of life on Earth. In this talk, learn about these animals and how we find and collect them.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Materials Science, Superconductors, and Solar Cells

Xiaoyu Cui (Faculty Member)

I can speak to a variety of subjects related to solid-state science based on the photoemission spectroscopy technique discovered by Albert Einstein. This includes specific topics in Materials Science (e.g. lithium, sodium, and phosphorous batteries; superconductor materials; solar cell batteries; what may be interesting for future graduate students).

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 90 minutes, projector preferred, English or Chinese, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Dark Matter and Dark Energy: How Do We Know They Exist and Why Do We Care?

Rainer Dick (Faculty Member)

Dark matter is the mysterious stuff that helps to keep galaxies together. Dark energy is a form of energy that accelerates the expansion of the universe. I will introduce the different astronomical observations which prove the existence of dark matter and dark energy, and then describe the many international efforts to observe dark matter in laboratories on Earth.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Origins of the Female Orgasm

Natalie Dinsdale (Instructor)

When we study the evolution of humans, we are often interested in the function or purpose of a given trait. In men, the orgasm has an obvious function in facilitating conception. In women, the purpose of orgasm – if there is one – remains a mystery. Several features of the female orgasm remain unexplained but new connections between childbirth, breast-feeding, and female sexuality are emerging.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Antimicrobial Use in Animals

Patricia Dowling (Faculty Member)

This presentation is on the use of antimicrobials in food animals and companion animals and the role of the veterinarian in preventing antimicrobial resistance while also protecting the health of animals and the human food supply.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 50 minutes, requires projector/computer, English, Saskatoon)

Supporting Complex Digital Communications

Nadeem Jamali (Faculty Member)

Although communication takes several forms among human beings and in nature, digital communication methods are relatively limited. This talk presents work at the UofS Agents Lab on supporting more complex types of digital communication, and their applications in areas such as crowd-sourced services.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, screen required, English, Saskatoon)

Power Grids with Renewable Energy Sources: From Monopoly to Democracy

Kalpesh Joshi (Researcher)

Electricity generation has been largely based on coal and oil with huge power-generating plants supplying electricity to every consumer. With the new technologies in power generation and electricity storage, it is now possible to generate power by smaller generating units nearby consumers. This can potentially place people in power with capacity to produce electricity and participate in electricity markets.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 90 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon and area)

Species at Risk in Saskatchewan Prairies

Jillian Kusch and Colleen Crill (Graduate Students)

*currently oversubscribed - new engagements available in November or later*

The prairies of Saskatchewan are home to a large range of fascinating species, some of which are now considered endangered. Increasing awareness of these species, and what we can do to help them, is essential for their continued survival in our province.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or Prince Albert and area)

Engineering Design

Sean Maw (Faculty Member)

I introduce the design process that engineers use to solve problems. We discuss the steps of problem definition, ideation, evaluation, selection, implementation and iteration - and how they relate to innovation. Groups should be a maximum of 45 people in order to facilitate a participatory activity where the audience is split up to work on a design scenario, based on examples of Indigenous watercrafts.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 60 to 75 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Technology Doping in Sport

Sean Maw (Faculty Member)

I explain the idea of technology doping in sport, similar conceptually to drug doping. I discuss several examples from different sports, as well as the place of technology in modern sport, from an ethical perspective.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 to 75 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Materials Science and the Synchrotron

Alexander Moewes (Faculty Member)

Depending on the interests of the audience, I can speak to a variety of different subjects. This includes specific topics in Materials Science (e.g. synchrotron radiation, next-generation materials for computers, condensed matter physics) as well as general topics in physics (e.g. how an acoustic guitar works, the state of Canadian science, careers in physics, why it is fun to be a graduate student).

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 90 minutes, projector preferred, English or German, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Beyond Rocks and Earth Resources

Lavie Nguyen (Student)

People usually think of geological sciences as the study of rocks, minerals, and gas/oils. However, the application of these sciences is diversified and nearly endless. They relate strongly to other disciplines and are used globally for many applications other than exploration. Thus, I would like to present about the merits of the geological sciences and provide some examples.

(suitable for Grades 1-12, 30 minutes, requires projector/board, English, Saskatoon)

Trends in the Canadian Food and Beverage Sector

Michael Nickerson (Faculty Member)

This talk will provide an overview of the Canadian food and beverage sector, hot and emerging consumer trends, and opportunities for Saskatchewan to capture.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or Regina)

Endangered Poison-Dart Frogs: How to Protect Them?

Andres Posso-Terranova (Researcher)

Under the global wave of biodiversity loss, conservation policies are urgently needed to protect constantly declining amphibian populations. In this work, I show how modern DNA technology coupled with colouration analysis is a powerful tool for the conservation of these charismatic frogs, which are considered to be amongst the most endangered species of all amphibians.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, requires computer/projector/speakers, English or Spanish, Saskatoon and area)

To Infinity and Beyond! The Mathematics of Infinity

Steven Rayan (Faculty Member)

Have you ever been curious about "infinity"? What is it really? How does it relate to numbers, counting, and the universe? Together, we'll not only find out what infinity is, but we might also discover more than one kind of infinity along the way!

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes or less, blackboard/whiteboard preferred, English, Saskatoon or Regina)

Engineers: Professional Problem Solvers

Robyn Reist (Graduate Student)

The career possibilities available to engineers are nearly infinite, yet we still often stereotype engineers as bridge builders and computer programmers. But have you ever heard of a forensic engineer, or a biomechanical epidemiologist? In this talk I hope to expand students’ perceptions of what engineers can be so that they can make more informed post-secondary education choices.

(suitable for Grades 9-12, 45 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon and area)

Food Colour Chemistry

Durre Shahwar (Researcher)

Food colour is important because it is tied to the quality of a food product, which may be either accepted or rejected simply on the basis of visual appearance. Three main classes of food colour are natural pigments, browning, and other additives. Consequences of food processing, which is an essential step in the food industry, may be positive or adverse for human health.

(suitable for Grades 9-12, 30 to 60 minutes, requires projector/board, English or Urdu, Saskatoon)

Contributing to Food Security by Improving Seeds

Tim Sharbel (Faculty Member)

An organism’s choice to reproduce with or without sex has long puzzled evolutionary biologists. Apomixis is a natural form of reproduction in plants whereby seeds are produced asexually such that a mother’s offspring are all genetically identical to herself. Apomixis represents a disruptive technology which could significantly change agricultural practices (e.g. fixing hybrid vigour in crops).

(suitable for any age, 15 to 60 minutes, projector required, English or French or German, Saskatoon)

How Big Brother Can Save the World

Kevin Stanley (Faculty Member)

The data collected about our day-to-day activities through technological means can be intimidating and overwhelming, but used correctly can also offer us insights into who we are. These insights can drive new methods of controlling disease, planning cities and understanding social interaction.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 40 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

*other staff and faculty from the Department of Computer Science may also be available through this speaker for presentations

Genetic Diversity of Wild Horse Populations (in Alberta and on Sable Island)

Christina Tollett (Graduate Student)

Using genetic techniques, I have evaluated the genetic diversity levels present in two feral horse populations, and how diverged they have become from their original breeds. My experiences on Sable Island (Nova Scotia) have been wonderful and I am keen to share the uniqueness and beauty of the island with others.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 15 to 40 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon or northern communities)

Why We Should Listen to the Plants!

Prakash Venglat (Researcher)

Plants have survived on Earth much longer than humans have. We depend on them for food, medicine and many other raw materials. We nurture, consume, enjoy, use, worship, and destroy the plants, but hardly listen to them. Listening to their developmental plasticity tells us wonderful stories of overcoming stress, their adaptive abilities, survival, and finding ways to thrive in new environments.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon)

Genetically Modified Organisms: What Are They?

Sean Walkowiak (Researcher)

This presentation covers the basics of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). What are they, how are they made, who makes them, what are they used for, and what do people think about them? The talk can be modified to fit any audience.

(suitable for any age, range of possible lengths, projector required, English, Saskatoon and area)

Sports Analytics

Keith Willoughby (Faculty Member)

I have developed a computer simulation model to predict the outcome of professional football games. The model also determines the likelihood of any team eventually winning the league championship. The Canadian Football League (CFL) regularly features the simulation model results on its website.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Horse Care and Management

Dianne Winkelman-Sim (Instructor)

People in the horse industry are subjected to a barrage of information from many sources. It can be a challenge to determine which of those sources are providing credible information. This presents the science of the horse so that people can make more informed decisions on the care and management of their horses.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Urban Agriculture and Urban Food Production

Grant Wood (Faculty Member)

Urban agriculture is the production of food (fruits, vegetables) within urban settings. This can be for personal consumption, donation and/or sale. Food can be produced on brown fields, undeveloped and developed city land, private land, front and back yards, school yards, church yards, roofs, etc. The speaker has given versions of this talk many times over the past several years.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Social Issues


Fair Trade: What's in It for Us?

Nancy Allan (Staff Member)

Fair trade can connect producers and consumers, but too often the emphasis is on people in the affluent North supporting poor people in the South. That’s only part of the picture. The other, empowering, part is that it can help create the inclusive world we want to live in. There are competing labels, and consumers should know what each promises.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 90 minutes, projector preferred, English or Spanish, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Sustainability at the University of Saskatchewan

Margret Asmuss (Staff Member)

This talk will cover: (1) understanding sustainability, (2) why universities are taking leadership on sustainability, (3) the evolution of sustainability at the University of Saskatchewan, (4) the U of S Campus Sustainability Plan, and (5) sustainability progress at the U of S and how we measure it.

(suitable for any age, range of possible lengths, projector preferred, English or French or German, Saskatoon and other locations in Saskatchewan)

*this speaker is also willing to present on climate change and specifically climate research at the UofS

The 2016 U.S. Elections and Their Potential Consequences

Daniel Béland (Faculty Member)

This timely talk takes a retrospective look at the 2016 electoral campaign in the United States and its potential impact on Canada and the rest of the world. It focuses on the presidential election but shows that equal attention should be paid to congressional and state races.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English or French, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

*this speaker is also willing to present on general topics of public policy, U.S. politics, and Canadian politics

5 Steps to Realizing Your Dreams

Marianne Bell (Staff Member)

We are all leaders - if not of others, at least of ourselves. As leaders, we have personal, professional, and/or organizational dreams, but pursuing them may be difficult. Turn dreams into achievable goals using five steps: visualize your destination, understand what it takes to get there, know who you need on the journey, recognize obstacles before they appear, and learn to adjust course as needed.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or virtual)

Principles of Good City Planning

Jill Blakley (Faculty Member)

City planning is something that affects all of us, but that not all of us think about. What are the ingredients to creating a community that everyone can enjoy and that is environmentally responsible, exciting and attractive, safe, and sustainable long into the future? I can speak on a variety of topics in this area, including the importance of inclusivity and public engagement strategies.

(suitable for any audience, 30 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Sexual Assault Law in Canada

Sarah Burningham (Faculty Member)

High profile cases in the US and Canada may leave Canadians wondering about the current state of the law on sexual assault. What does the law say about consent? About intoxication and sex? This talk will review the Criminal Code provisions on consent and the major Supreme Court cases on consent and sexual assault.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 20 to 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon)

Psychology of Safety: Know Your Limitations, Stay Safe and Healthy

Valery Chirkov (Faculty Member)

We all hope to stay uninjured and alive when driving, doing our jobs, working at home or being outdoors, but still people kill themselves and others in traffic accidents, and get injuries at work and even at home. Why are we sometimes so careless? In this presentation, I will inquire into the psychological and social limitations that sometimes prevent us from staying safe and healthy.

(suitable for adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon and area)

Free Speech and Diversity

Susan Dieleman (Faculty Member)

We tend to think that free speech is integral to well-functioning democratic societies. We also tend to think that including diverse voices is key to democratic success. But what happens when unrestricted free speech and the need for including diverse voices come into conflict? This talk suggests that there might be good reasons for democracies to prioritize inclusion over free speech.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 20 to 50 minutes, projector/computer preferred, English, Saskatoon)

What is Rape Culture? How Can We Transform It?

Justine Gieni (Staff Member)

Rape culture is a social system that normalizes male sexual violence against women and others through the exploitation and objectification of women and the perpetuation of toxic forms of masculinity. In my talk, I discuss examples of rape culture, examples of toxic masculinity, and ways we can resist and transform rape culture.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or Regina or Vancouver)

Introduction to Experimental Decision Making

Brianna Groot (Staff Member)

I introduce the fundamentals of experimental design relating to the field of social sciences. This talk presents an applied overview of the scientific method, and discusses problems that could lead to a flawed data set. Attendees will learn how to develop their own ideas into testable hypotheses, and to critically evaluate research.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Critical Perspectives on Gender and Health

Nikisha Khare (Graduate Student)

Let’s unpack the deeply ingrained social structures and processes that maintain and perpetuate gender and racial inequity, both in Canada and globally. Using critical feminist theories, we will examine historic and current social injustice as the root cause of health inequity today. We will touch on a wide variety of gendered issues, including political, economic, social, and environmental issues.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45-minute talk to 3-hour workshop, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations or Vancouver)

Finding Love in the 21st Century: Changing Ways We Date and Couple

Sarah Knudson (Faculty Member)

The ways in which we meet and get to know potential romantic partners have changed drastically in recent decades. Technology, a changing economy and job market, and changing ideas about what long-term relationships and marriages should offer have all contributed to these shifts. What are the implications of the changes, for our private lives and for society?

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector/computer/whiteboard preferred, English or French, Saskatoon or Vancouver or Calgary)

How Canada Can Address Climate Change and Achieve Sustainability

Jason MacLean (Faculty Member)

How can Canada meet its commitments under the UN Paris Climate Change Agreement and Sustainable Development Goals? This talk outlines the law and policy obstacles and opportunities in Canada today.

(suitable for adults, 30 to 90 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon)

Sustainability, Human Rights, and the Evolution of Corporate Law

Jason MacLean (Faculty Member)

Holding corporations accountable for human rights abuses and environmental harms is one of law’s most daunting challenges. This talk describes an emerging form of transnational corporate law capable of increasing corporate accountability and driving greater sustainability.

(suitable for adults, 30 to 90 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon)

Politics in Saskatchewan and Canada

David McGrane (Faculty Member)

I can speak on a variety of subjects related to Canadian federal politics and Saskatchewan provincial politics, depending on the interests of the audience. Topics might include electoral reform, political parties, elections, multiculturalism, childcare, polling, and political strategy.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 15 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English or French, Saskatoon/Prince Albert/Moose Jaw/Regina)

Taxes and You

Devan Mescall (Faculty Member)

My focus is on how changing tax policy affects our decisions both as individuals and as corporations. While my research is primarily in a multinational setting, I am happy to speak on broader questions of tax policy or current issues. My goal is always to remove the complexities around tax to make it accessible and relevant to the particular interests of the audience.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Leadership Lessons and Emotional Intelligence

Shawna Pandya (Alum)

Being a leader doesn’t mean being at the head of the pack barking out orders. It means stepping back to see how things might play out and really knowing your team inside out. It also means understanding emotional intelligence, the "mortar between the bricks" of effective teams. I'll draw on my experiences in medicine, space, Silicon Valley, and martial arts to discuss this subject.

(suitable for adults, 15 to 90 minutes, projector required, English or French, Prince Albert or other Saskatchewan locations)

*this speaker is also registered with the National Speakers Bureau

Talking about Conflict: An Interest-Based Approach

Charmaine Panko (Instructor)

Learn how to use an interest-based approach to negotiations and in dealing with conflict, along with the options that are available so that parties can resolve legal issues by reaching settlement outside of court.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector/whiteboard/flipchart preferred, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Science, Technology and Innovation

Peter Phillips (Faculty Member)

This talk discusses the ways we make choices about advanced technologies (e.g. new foods, production techniques, consumer goods). It also address the social and economic impacts of those choices. Depending on the audience, the presentation can be conceptual or case-based, general or technical.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Surveillance, Privacy, and Society: Big Brother to Edward Snowden

Scott Thompson (Faculty Member)

This talk addresses the questions of “what is surveillance?” and “how is it shaping our daily lives?” It starts with why privacy is important, and then discusses what surveillance is and how it is impacting us day to day. Special attention will be paid to social media, police carding, government surveillance, and consumer surveillance, as well as what can be done about intrusions to privacy.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, range of possible lengths, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon and area)

The Coming Demographic Shift: Human Resource and Career Pattern Implications

Rosemary Venne (Faculty Member)

This presentation begins with an overview of Canada’s changing demographic profile, followed by tracing changes in career patterns in the post-war period. Currently we have flattening corporate hierarchies, rising skill requirements, less promotion-centred careers, and lifelong learning. What are the best retention policies and leadership strategies to deal with changing career patterns, population shifts, and generational differences?

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 50-60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

City Planning and Inspired Urbanism

Ryan Walker (Faculty Member)

Cities are fascinating and vital to our society. This talk is about how good urbanism is fueled by careful attention to design, environment, social, cultural, and economic dimensions. Thriving cities require attention to each of these dimensions, rather than privileging one or two at the expense of the others. City planning is at the centre of this important enterprise.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Health


AI and Robotics in Medicine: Will They Replace Medical Staff?

Abbas Al-Zubaidi (Researcher)

Artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics are rapidly developing areas. What will their role in the healthcare system be during this 4th industrial revolution? How far could we go with these technologies? Will they replace medical staff for nursing, consultation, diagnosis, surgery, or other areas? This talk will address these questions and highlight futuristic clinical technologies.

(suitable for adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Herbal Medicines: Do They Work? Are They Safe?

Stan Bardal (Faculty Member)

The use of natural health products (NHP) is a big business, and their popularity is rising. This talk will provide a general overview of the process involved in regulating NHP, as well as focus on the pharmacology (mechanisms of action, safety) and evidence of benefit (or not) for a number of commonly used NHP.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 40 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or Prince Albert)

How Drugs Work and Why They Sometimes Cause Harm

Stan Bardal (Faculty Member)

This talk reviews the general mechanisms by which drugs carry out their effects, both beneficial effects and side effects. By obtaining a better understanding of how their medications work, patients may be empowered to ask better questions of their care providers and play more of an active role in managing their health.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 40 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or Prince Albert)

Maternal Mental Health

Angela Bowen (Faculty Member)

Maternal mental health affects 1 in 5 women in Saskatchewan. I give public and professional talks about anxiety and depression in pregnant and postpartum women. I share the resources we have developed and discuss the changes we have made across the province.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

D-Stress: Put the FUN Back in Life

Kathleen Brown (Staff Member)

I take the audience beyond the concepts of exercise and eating healthy to manage stress. I discuss the effects of stress on the body and talk about techniques (such as meditation) to prevent and minimize stress for individuals, employees, groups, and organizations.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon and area)

Well-Being, Including Sleep, and Its Influence on Leadership Behaviors

Erica Carleton (Faculty Member)

This talk explains how a leader’s own health and well-being, including their sleep habits, affects their leadership behavior. We will also discuss the potential impact of this on employees and organizations.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon)

*this speaker is also willing to present on general topics of leadership and sleep

Growing Older in Place of Choice

Roslyn Compton (Faculty Member)

The focus of my research is to find approaches to healthcare that support older adults to age in their choice of place. These approaches take an interprofessional approach, which values clients and caregivers’ independence and engagement in their care. It is important to see the client not as a disease or diagnosis, but rather as a person with experiences.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 or adults, 30 to 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

The Health Benefits of Having a Dog in Your Life

Colleen Dell (Faculty Member)

Ever wondered why you felt good when you were around a dog? In this presentation, learn about the latest science behind our relationship with dogs and how it provides amazing benefits to our health. We'll discuss both companion dogs and therapy dogs, and also learn a little bit about how humans are beneficial for dog health. A St. John Ambulance therapy dog will be on site to demonstrate.

(suitable for any age, range of possible lengths, requires pet-friendly location, English, Saskatoon and area)

LSD in Medicine

Erika Dyck (Faculty Member)

The word ‘psychedelic’ was coined by a psychiatrist in Weyburn, Saskatchewan in 1957. This province was once home to cutting-edge LSD research, including using LSD to treat alcoholism and as a window into the world of schizophrenia. My research looks back at these experiments to ask how Saskatchewan became an international hub for psychedelic studies, and what happened to that research.

(suitable for any age, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

*this speaker is also willing to present on general topics of mental health, history of medicine, reproductive rights, and history of psychiatry

3D Printing Your Body's Tissues

Brian Eames (Faculty Member)

Yes, people around the world are using new advances in 3D printing to build living tissues. I’ll go over the basic concepts of this approach in tissue engineering, as well as some of my lab’s work on 3D printing articular (joint) cartilage.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 40 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Feast or Famine? The Impact of Diet on Our Genomes

Zoe Gillespie (Graduate Student)

You are what you eat. For decades it has been known that altering diet (decreasing caloric intake) in specific ways can increase health and lifespan of various animals. Drugs, such as rapamycin and metformin, mimic this diet. However, the question remains; how do changes in dietary intake and its mimetics impact the way our bodies interpret our genetic blue print?

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector/whiteboard preferred, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Immunotherapeutics for Immunologic Disease

John Gordon (Faculty Member)

We have found that we can reverse asthma and food allergies in mouse models using cell therapy, and shown that this is relevant also for allergic cells from asthmatic individuals. We are focusing now on translating this research into a clinical reality.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

The Internet: An Instruction Manual for Cancer, or Not?

Kristen Haase (Faculty Member)

Since the advent of the internet, more and more people use it to find information about health and illness. For people with cancer, who face a lot of questions, decisions, and unknowns, the internet can be a great resource. But the internet, and its use by people with cancer, can also present challenges. Is the internet an important tool for people with cancer, or something to avoid?

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 minutes or less, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon and area)

Activity through Life Keeps You Healthy

Liz Harrison (Faculty Member)

Research with communities of individuals at different ages involved in physical activity shows many benefits for quality of life, physical function and health. As one ages, our ability to participate in activities may change. Learn some options to consider that will keep you active and happy and potentially reduce pain, functional limitations, disability and illnesses.

(suitable for adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other locations in Saskatchewan)

*this speaker is also willing to present on general topics of physical activity, pain, and ageing

Nutrition and the Microbiome

Natasha Haskey (Faculty Member)

The human microbiome is one of the hottest areas of medical science and offers great promise for optimizing health and managing disease. Over the last decade, research has demonstrated that the microbiota in our gut are important to health and well-being. What we eat has a significant impact on the gut microbiome.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon)

Shoulder Dysfunction in Breast Cancer Survivors

Soo Kim (Faculty Member)

An estimated 24000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in Canada in 2016; about 700 of these will be in Saskatchewan. Survivorship has increased but post-treatment shoulder dysfunction has become a formidable problem. Are there important musculoskeletal risk factors we can identify that may help improve screening, prevention and rehabilitation care for breast cancer survivors?

(suitable for adults, 30 to 40 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

What You Need to Know About Dentures

Rick Kroener (Staff Member)

As a dental technician with 35+ years of experience, I would like to educate people about dentures – the harm and the good they can do. As a technician, I see many things a dentist does not encounter. I also have seen people’s lives change and improve in ways most cannot imagine. This needs to be talked about!

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English or German, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Saskatchewan Screening Program for Colorectal Cancer

Bernard Lawlor (Faculty Member)

The Saskatchewan Screening Program for Colorectal cancer has been in place since 2009, fully provincial by 2013. I will explain how to access the program, the response so far, and the expectation of screening on removing pre-cancerous lesions and therefore improving survival.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Health Policy and Health Services Research

Steven Lewis (Faculty Member)

This talk can cover numerous topics such as: health policy, healthcare utilization, health services research, the future of medicare, the politics of healthcare, or change management in the health sector. I will adjust the content of the talk to match the audience's interests.

(suitable for adults, 15 to 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon)

Nurse Practitioners: Improving Health for All

Janet Luimes (Faculty Member)

We will discuss what a Nurse Practitioner is, including the roles and responsibilities, education/training, work settings and how Nurse Practitioners address health concerns of individuals, families and communities. This presentation may also address other health promotion and disease prevention topics of interest to the audience such as cancer screening, healthy lifestyles, and chronic disease management.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 120 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

Where to Get Good Health Information from Websites

Cathy MacLean (Faculty Member)

*not available Mondays or Wednesdays, please make requests 2-3 months in advance*

As a family doctor with an interest in self care and patient education, I can recommend many excellent resources that people can access for credible health information on the internet.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes or less, requires internet access, English, Saskatoon and area)

Causes of and Exercises to Treat Urinary Incontinence in Adults

Stéphanie Madill (Faculty Member)

Urinary incontinence, and related problems such as urgency, affect a significant proportion of adults, both men and women. These problems can significantly impact individuals’ physical activity, mental health and sexuality. Pelvic floor muscle exercises can be an effective treatment for these problems.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, range of possible lengths, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or Edmonton)

Exploring the Relationship between Nutrition and Body Composition

Marc Morris (Researcher)

What should you eat to get in better shape? The relationship between nutrition and body composition can be confusing. In this 1-hour seminar, the presenter details the most important aspects of nutrition when trying to alter body composition, demystifies nutritional dogma, and introduces the concept of “flexible” dieting.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 or adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, on campus)

A 'Backstage Pass' to a Kidney Transplant from One Person to Another

Mike Moser (Faculty Member)

Even after 20 years, I remain amazed that we can take an organ from one person, keep it alive, and then put it into another person. Many discoveries had to come together including surgical techniques, organ preservation, and drugs to prevent rejection. From the first call to the patient leaving the operating room with a working kidney, I will show you how it happens. I have been giving versions of this talk for 15 years.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 minutes, requires projector/video/speakers, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Saskatchewan Pioneers the NanoKnife: A Safer Cancer-Killer

Mike Moser (Faculty Member)

The NanoKnife is a new technology that can destroy tumors without the use of heat or radiation and therefore minimizing collateral damage. Safety around blood vessels, nerves, and ducts means hope for some tumors that were previously considered untreatable. Saskatoon is only the second center in Canada to offer NanoKnife to our patients. This technology will become an important tool in the fight against many types of cancer in the next decade.

(suitable for adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Considering a Career in Research Administration?

Karen Mosier (Staff Member)

There is a need for individuals who understand the institutional research environment and have the skills to meet the growing needs of researchers. I will cover what kind of educational background, experience, and skill set is required to move into a research administration career path. More broadly, I will talk about how to move your career forward by developing your knowledge and growing your network.

(suitable for Grades 9-12, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon)

Safe Environments for Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities: Sexual Health Promotion

Lee Murray (Faculty Member)

There are very few services and limited information related to sexual health and children/adolescents with developmental disabilities. A project has been developed to fill this need. It is a community project with a number of partners that work together to deliver sexual health educational sessions to adolescents with developmental disabilities as well as their parents and their teachers.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon)

Spinal Cord Injury and Electronic Implants for Restoring Function

Jonathan Norton (Faculty Member)

Implants to electrically stimulate nerves can restore critical functions after spinal cord injuries, such as bladder and bowel functions. We are implanting these into clinical practice and developing new devices that may allow for the restoration of other functions such as walking.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 10 to 60 minutes, projector or board required, English, Saskatoon or Regina or Prince Albert)

New Vaccines: Why and How?

Elodie Pastural (Staff Member)

Immunization is the most successful public health measure according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. Every year, more than two million deaths are prevented worldwide thanks to immunization. Let’s explore what a vaccine is made of, how it works and why there are so few new vaccines released despite many promising discoveries.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English or French, Saskatoon and area)

The Earliest Origins of Health and Disease in a Person's Life

Alan Rosenberg (Faculty Member)

Most chronic diseases have their origins before the disease becomes apparent. There is evidence that genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors during pregnancy or in early childhood might influence the occurrence of disease later in the child’s life. This talk will cover current research that is investigating these factors.

(suitable for adults, 30 to 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Accelerator to Hospital: Turning Science into Nuclear Medicine

Dale Schick-Martin (Staff Member)

A routine method of finding tumors within the body is PET (positron emission tomography) scanning. But this relies on "tracer" chemicals that are very short-lived. The radiopharmacies that produce these tracers are an intersection of physics, chemistry, logistics, and healthcare. I’ll discuss how these disciplines all come together to reliably produce these critical drugs everyday.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon)

How a Medical School Can Be Good for Your Health

Preston Smith (Faculty Member)

When you have a medical school in your community (your city, region or province), you are healthier as a result. The academic interactions supported by a medical school—from enhanced training and professional development opportunities to locally led and conducted research—create a culture of local knowledge and awareness that doesn’t exist when learning and discovery take place greater distances away.

(suitable for adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon and Regina)

What All Diabetic Patients Must Know about Their Feet

Brian Ulmer (Faculty Member)

Many people with Diabetes are very likely to develop foot problems over their lifetime. What causes this to occur is an abnormality with the circulation and in particular various nerves to the feet. Appropriate foot gear and care can greatly reduce the risks of foot infection and injury.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Neglected Global Diseases Initiative: Developing Medicines for the Developing World

Kishor Wasan (Faculty Member)

Neglected global diseases are infectious conditions that disproportionately affect the poorest of the world's populations (e.g. HIV/AIDS, malaria). They thrive in conditions of extreme poverty, and children are particularly vulnerable. The Neglected Global Diseases Initiative brings together a variety of fields (e.g. business, pharmaceuticals, social policy) to break down barriers to success in treating these conditions.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon and area)

Health Care Process Improvement

Keith Willoughby (Faculty Member)

Patients can experience long waits and delays in health care processes. “Lean” has been espoused as an approach to improve system performance. I can speak on the promise (and pitfalls) on using these approaches to analyze health care processes.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

How to Live to Be 100

Thomas Wilson (Faculty Member)

The “warranty” for humans appears to be about 85 years. Stretching this to 100 will be difficult, given the genetic contribution to longevity. However, we can increase our chances of reaching the “century” by proper diet, exercise, and detecting and treating cardiovascular risk factors.

(suitable for adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

New Hepatitis C Treatments: Too Good to Be True?

Alexander Wong (Faculty Member)

The development of direct-acting antivirals to treat hepatitis C infections has been called a medical miracle. But many obstacles still stand in the way of worldwide distribution, such as high costs and difficulties in engaging with vulnerable populations. This talk will provide a history of the hepatitis C virus, an update on current and anticipated treatments, and a discussion of challenges that remain.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, requires projector/remote, English, Saskatoon or Regina)

*this speaker is also willing to present on other chronic viral infections (e.g. HIV, hepatitis B)

Education


The Canadian Math Wars: A Disagreement over School Mathematics

Egan Chernoff (Faculty Member)

The Math Wars, Eh? Believe it or not, the teaching and learning of mathematics has become a staple of local, provincial and national media coverage over the last five years. The purpose of this talk is to provide an abridged version (5 years presented in 1 hour) of the recent heated debate over the teaching and learning of mathematics.

(suitable for any age, 45 to 90 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other locations in Saskatchewan)

How Can We Communicate Effectively?

Samantha Ekanayake (Staff Member)

Due to the rise of social networking and mobile electronic devices, we now tend to overlook the importance of effective public speaking. Most experienced public speakers believe that effective communication is a learnable skill, not a natural talent. I will speak on various training techniques and the basic concepts of speech, such as preparation, slides, and delivery.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, requires projector/internet, English, Saskatoon and area)

Excelling in Spite of Your Background

Linda Gorim (Researcher)

Who you are as a person is not only a matter of the genes you carry but a combination of factors including the environment where you grew up and, most importantly, how you see yourself. Success can be a reality for you if you fully understand your circumstances, set goals, and live in the realization that there is a legacy to pass on. This talk centers around my own life story.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon)

Math: When Are We Ever Going to Use This?

Josha Ho (Graduate Student)

*currently oversubscribed - new engagements available in January or later*

People often wonder if the things learned in the classroom will actually help them, especially when learning mathematics. To help answer these questions, students will be introduced to historical examples, approximations, and applications to technology that use precisely the methods they have been taught to solve life problems. The speaker has given versions of this talk many times over the past several years.

(suitable for Grades 5-12, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

The Effects of Physical Activity on Learning for Children

Serene Kerpan (Instructor)

My research focuses on how physical activity affects a child’s ability to stay on-task and learn in the classroom. In particular I work with Indigenous communities and schools to promote physical activity for learning purposes. My research has shown that physical activity integrated in the classroom improves learning outcomes for children from kindergarten to Grade 5.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 or adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Undergraduate Research: Getting Started in Discovery

Kara Loy (Staff Member)

We help educators design research projects. We show students how to find and make the most of these opportunities. UofS students, for example, can pursue discovery first-hand by asking researchable questions, investigating, and sharing their findings (even in their first year). Many go on to present their projects at conferences, events, and as published articles. This commitment to undergraduate research at the University of Saskatchewan ensures a culture of learning and leadership essential to solving the world's problems.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 15 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English or Spanish, Saskatoon and area)

Instructional Psychology, Learning and Development

Simon McCrea (Instructor)

Instructional psychology focuses on the processes of learning in educational environments. It outlines the structuring and planning of instructional environments that help facilitate the attainment of subject matter competence in students. The focus of this talk will be to examine a few of the most contemporary models of problem solving in instructional psychology based on learning theory.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or Regina)

Follow Your Bliss: Stay Connected to That Which You Love upon Leaving High School

Dean McNeill (Faculty Member)

This is an inspirational talk on what high school-aged students should consider when examining their options (university and otherwise) upon high school graduation. It is applicable to high, middle, and low academic achievers, and is not an attempt to convince all high school students that university is for them. The speaker has given this talk over 40 times.

(suitable for Grades 9-12, 60 minutes, requires projector/speaker, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Educating for Diverse Perspectives on Food Processing, Safety and Security

Venkatesh Meda (Faculty Member)

Interdisciplinary education, research and academic collaboration are in huge demand due to rapidly changing demographics, technology revolution and globalisation. In order to manage global food security, safety and quality, the education sector needs rapid adjustment strategies and new training opportunities, affecting both trainers and students.

(suitable for adults, 40 to 60 minutes, projector/whiteboard preferred, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Place-Based Education: The Community as Classroom

Dianne Miller (Faculty Member)

This talk is oriented towards teachers and in-school administrators. It provides a basic overview of the field of place-based education (PBE), selected examples of how it is taken up in schools, the benefits to students, its alignment with Indigenous ways of teaching and learning and ways the College of Education is fostering it in the teacher education program.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes or less, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

The New Old Education

Raymond Spiteri (Faculty Member)

I will speak about 1) my experience with using “new” technology for teaching, specifically the flipped classroom, team-based learning, and mobile apps for practice tests; 2) the impact of this new technology in terms of education and student learning; and 3) a vision for what the classroom of the future will look like and how we can start embracing it now.

(suitable for any age, 60 minutes, projector required and wireless access preferred, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Struggling Learners with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Linda Wason-Ellam (Faculty Member)

Most children diagnosed with FASD struggle academically. These learners have a wide range of language, thinking, and attention difficulties resulting in low reading and writing achievement. Nevertheless, they can learn but they learn differently. My work shows success when multiple methods of learning are available, such as art, drumming, storytelling, singing, and visual aids.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector/whiteboard preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

Arts-Based and Place-Based Education for Young Minds

Barbara Wotherspoon (Instructor)

This talk acknowledges the integral role of the arts, nature and contemplation in the structural and functional development of children’s minds. It critiques current education that individualizes and “separates” children from each other, the natural world, and their inner selves; and it envisions practice that promotes children’s natural tendencies for compassion, imaginative collaboration and instinctual connection to all living beings.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Help

Please note that a speaker's willingness to travel outside of Saskatoon is often dependent on being reimbursed for travel costs. Also, do not hesitate to fill out the request form or send a general inquiry, even if you are unsure about meeting a speaker's requirements. We welcome the opportunity to discuss any possibilities.