PROPOSED GRADUATE OFFERINGS: 2003-2004


803.3 (01) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "History of the Book from Codex to Electronic Communication - I" 803.3 (02) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "History of the Book from Codex to Electronic Communication - II"
803.3 (03) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "Middle English Narrative and the Means of Trouthe" 803.3 (04) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "Slavery as an Under-presence in Literature of the British Romantic Period"
804.6 (01) Studies in Individual Authors: "John Donne: Poetry and Prose" 819.3 (02) Topics in Methods and Texts: "Literary Historical Methods"
842.6 (01) Studies in Genres and Contexts: "Literature and the Discourse of Aging" 843.3 (02) Topics in Genres and Contexts: "Women's Colonial and Post-Colonial Autobiography"
Proposed Graduate Offerings: 2003-2004

Note: Please direct any questions about graduate studies to the Graduate Chair:
Dr. Anthony Harding,
harding@duke.usask.ca

803.3 (01) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "History of the Book from Codex to Electronic Communication - I"
Term 1, Monday 1:30-3:30

Peter Stoicheff

These two linked half-courses will deal with the "history of the book" over a wide historical range, from the "birth of the codex" in the second and third centuries A.D. to the invention of the printing press in the fifteenth century to electronic communication in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Part I of this course will be a prerequisite for Part II.

803.3 (02) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "History of the Book from Codex to Electronic Communication - II"
Term 2, Monday 1:30-3:30

Peter Stoicheff

These two linked half-courses will deal with the "history of the book" over a wide historical range, from the "birth of the codex" in the second and third centuries A.D. to the invention of the printing press in the fifteenth century to electronic communication in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Part I of this course will be a prerequisite for Part II.

803.3 (03) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "Middle English Narrative and the Meanings of Trouthe"
Term 1, Monday 3:30-5:30

Yin Liu

Late medieval English narrative shows a pervasive concern with the meanings of trouthe, a Middle English word with a different semantic configuration than modern English truth. This course will investigate some of the social, legal, epistemological, theological, and ethical issues that surround this idea in fictions of the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries. Using as a starting point Richard Firth Green’s theory that the fourteenth century in England experienced a "crisis of truth" associated with a shift from an oral to a literate mindset and a corresponding upheaval in the way social relationships were understood, we’ll look at trouthe in works by Chaucer, Lydgate, and Langland, as well as in a selection of anonymous Middle English romances. We will also consider disguise, fictionality, and forgery; representations of treason; trouthe in allegory; translation and authority; and the social structures assumed and questioned by writers for whom trouthe meant not so much fidelity to facts as loyalty to people. This course will be of interest not only to students hoping to specialize in medieval literature but also to students interested in connections between literature and law, "oral culture," history, and philosophy.

803.3 (04) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "Slavery as an Under-presence in Literature of the British Romantic Period"
Term 2, Monday 9:30-11:30

Anthony Harding

It has long been recognized that the atrocities associated with slavery are not only a prominent theme, but often a significant sub-text in romantic-era literature. This course will focus on a variety of material written between 1780 to1850, some of it literature that alludes openly to slavery, some of it figuring slavery, plantation culture or the Middle Passage in more indirect ways. Texts to be considered include Coleridge’s "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," Wollstonecraft’s The Wrongs of Woman, Austen’s Mansfield Park, De Quincey’s "Savannah-la-Mar" from Suspiria De Profundis, and Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. The theoretical and philosophical context for the anti-slavery debate will be studied from selections in Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze’s Race and the Enlightenment and from primary and secondary works in a readings package.

804.6 (01) Studies in Individual Authors: "John Donne: Poetry and Prose"
Tuesday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Brent Nelson 

This course will address the age-old issue of the relationship between the poet and the preacher (more generally, the writer of prose) by considering the generic relationships between his poetry and his prose. For example, we will compare Donne's epithalamions with his marriage sermons, the voice of the satirist with the voice of the preacher, his devotional poetry and the devotional prose of the Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, his poetry of compliment in the verse epistles and his sermons delivered to the king and his court.

819.3 (02) Topics in Methods and Texts: "Literary Historical Methods"
Term 2, Friday 9:30-11:30

Ron Cooley

Literary scholars have always considered a broad range of non-literary materials-paintings, personal letters, architecture, newspaper reports, clothing, religious pamphlets, trial transcripts, conduct books, advertisements, and so on-to flesh out the personal and social contexts of literary works. More recently, however, the foreground/background model implicit in such study has altered; instead of privileging literary texts, scholars often read literary and non-literary sources together, as participating in a shared discourse of images, symbolic associations, narrative assumptions, and rhetorical strategies. The discipline of History too has undergone a change, taking a "linguistic turn" in recognizing language as an appropriate and necessary object of historical investigation rather than a transparent window on the world. The result has been a significant cross-fertilization of literary and historical studies. This seminar will consider examples of this research in early modern studies, asking what it means to read non-literary texts using the tools of literary analysis, and to read literature using the tools of the historian. How does such an approach enrich our understanding of early modern culture? Are there limitations to such an approach? What tools and resources are necessary for fruitful investigations of this nature? Specific areas of exploration will include urban and rural culture, religion, and the family.

842.6 (01) Studies in Genres and Contexts: "Literature and the Discourse of Aging"
Wednesday 9:30-11:30

Doug Thorpe 

In popular usage, the term "aging" has become synonymous with the declining function commonly assumed to be the lot of old age. Such usage is supported by a number of prejudices: that it is only old people who are affected by aging, that declining function entails a loss of subjectivity, that the very old (like the very young) need to be managed by the able-bodied, and that the study of aging is the study of old people and their problems. This course will try to uncover the cultural history that has produced such prejudices, study the role of literature in both shaping and critiquing them, find a language that enables a more comprehensive view of the human lifecourse, and analyse the ageism that infects our discourse as readers and interpreters. We will thus read both criticism and literature, both the literature of childhood and the literature of old age, from a variety of nationalities and periods. There will be ample opportunity for students to adapt the vocabulary of the course to texts of particular interest to them. In the first phase of the course we will engage with theory, examining specific models of critical discourse on aging and assess their usefulness. In the second phase of the course we will isolate two historical moments: the invention of childhood in the late 1700's and early 1800's, and the medicalization and bureaucratization of the human lifecourse in the early twentieth century. In each case I will first provide some historical context, and then we will read selected literary texts (or one major text) to see how conflicting discourses of aging are at work there. In the final phase, two teams of students will each present one major text chosen by the team. I would like the agenda for these presentations to be determined by the students as much as possible, provided it is pertinent to the course.

843.3 (02) Topics in Genres and Contexts: "Women's Colonial and Post-Colonial Autobiography"
Term 2, Thursday 1:00-3:00

Carol Morrell 

In this course, we will look at a variety of shorter autobiographical accounts from Boehmer’s Empire Writing and at several full-length autobiographies. These will probably include Isak Dinesen’s Out of Africa, Bessie Head’s A Woman Alone, Miles Franklin’s My Brilliant Career, Maria Campbell’s Halfbreed, and poetry and prose by Claire Harris. In addition to the primary texts, we will study from a package of readings that will include theoretical writing about colonialism and postcolonialism as well as about autobiography, and some current ideas about the subject, subjectivity, and subjugation.

PROPOSED GRADUATE OFFERINGS: 2004-2005

This list is posted for information ONLY, and is subject to alteration.
Section numbers for half classes which denote term may be changed.


802.6 (01) Studies in Literary and Cultural History: "Images of Islam in German and English Literature of the Reformation and Early Modern Period" 802.6 (02) Studies in Literary and Cultural History: "Sex in the "Long" Eighteenth Century"
803.3 (01) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "Howard O'Hagan's Tay John and Robert Kroetsch's The Studhorse Man" 811.3 (01) Topics in National or Regional Literatures: The American Historical Novel"
817.3 (01) Topics in Literary and Cultural Theory: Working with Aboriginal Literature: Theory and Methodology" 817.3 (02) Topics in Literary and Cultural Theory: Modernist Literature and Aesthetic Judgment"
819.6 (01) Studies in Methods and Texts: "Literature and Disability Theory" 843.3 (01) Topics in Genres and Contexts: "The Modernist Lyrics of H.D. and Mina Loy"
Proposed Graduate Offerings: 2004-2005

Note: This list is posted for information ONLY, and is subject to alteration. Please direct any questions about graduate studies to the Graduate Chair:
Dr. Anthony Harding,
harding@duke.usask.ca
Section numbers for half classes which denote term may be changed.

802.6 (01) Studies in Literary and Cultural History: "Images of Islam in German and English Literature of the Reformation and Early Modern Period"
Judith Rice Henderson and Silke Falkner (Lanuguages and Linguistics)

This course will deal with such topics as the experience of Continental Europe with the Ottoman Empire; the image of Islam in the German Reformation; and the image of Islam in the English Reformation. Texts will include works by Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Luther.

802.6 (02) Studies in Literary and Cultural History: "Sex in the "Long" Eighteenth Century"
Ray Stephanson 

This 6-credit-unit seminar investigates the literary and non-literary aspects of the history of sexuality in the period 1660-1780. The seminar will be organized around four contexts: (1) the "invention" of sex as a subject of formal study from the late seventeenth century (i.e. medical, popularized sexologies), (2) the origins of modern pornography, (3) literary representations of sex and gender, (4) eighteenth-century sex and law, religion, morality, and art history.

803.3 (01) Topics in Literary and Cultural History: "Howard O'Hagan's Tay John and Robert Kroetsch's The Studhorse Man"
Francis Zichy 

In this class we will conduct a close reading of two twentieth-century Canadian novels, which will be studied in a variety of contexts, cultural, scientific, historical, and literary-theoretical. The seminar will focus on the following topics: 1. immediate literary antecedents and parallel texts; 2. the "deep" cultural and literary context and background (folklore, myth); 3. the historical background and context.

Secondary reading:
There will be a large collection of pertinent secondary readings (on reserve in the library), in the criticism of Canadian literature, in literary theory, mythology, history, and the social sciences. These will be required readings and will be discussed in seminar reports and essays. There will also be a final examination in this class.

811.3 (01) Topics in National or Regional Literatures: "The American Historical Novel"
Bill Bartley

American writers provide us with outstanding examples of the historical novel – or what might be more accurately described as "the novel of historical emergence." Our tasks include: (1) revisiting an old question: what is the relationship between history and fiction? (2) assessing its efficacy as an instrument of ethical-political inquiry; (3) clarifying the conceptions of time, human agency, and historical change the genre embodies – noting its deep preoccupation, that is, with how change happens. Some writers we will look at include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, and Wallace Stegner, among others.

817.3 (01) Topics in Literary and Cultural Theory: "Working with Aboriginal Literature: Theory and Methodology"
Kristina Fagan 

This course will explore how to work with aboriginal literature in a way that is respectful and meaningful to aboriginal people. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches that arise out of the traditions, values, and goals of aboriginal communities.

817.3 (02) Topics in Literary and Cultural Theory: "Modernist Literature and Aesthetic Judgment"
Rebecca Cameron

This course will consider modern drama, fiction, and poetry in light of theories of aesthetic evaluation ranging from Kant, Roger Fry, and the Leavises to Pierre Bourdieu, Martha Nussbaum, and Barbara Herrnstein Smith. The course will consider such questions as what makes a novel, poem, or play "good"? Who decides? Is objective evaluation of a literary text possible? What role, if any, do class, gender, race, and education play in aesthetic judgments? Within this context, we will read plays by Ibsen and initial responses to them in England, novels dealing with aesthetic judgments (e.g. Forster's Howards End and James's The Ambassadors), one or more popular novels (e.g. Marie Corelli), and poetry published in – and rejected from – modernist little magazines. The second term syllabus will be developed in collaboration with students, who will be encouraged to propose texts that intersect with their own research plans or interests.

819.6 (01) Studies in Methods and Texts: "Literature and Disability Theory"
Kathleen James-Cavan

This course will draw on contemporary disability theory to investigate the work of disability in literature. Until recently, the category of disability has been overlooked "as a foundational category of social experience or symbolic investment" with the same status as race, class, sexual orientation, and gender (Mitchell and Snyder, The Body and Physical Difference: Discourses of Disability, 1). This course aims to reduce that gap by introducing students to the ways that canonical and non-canonical literature constructs the disabled body. Although our literary study will be initially confined to British literature of the "long" eighteenth century, students will be expected in the second term to furnish literary samples from their own areas of expertise.

843.3 (01) Topics in Genres and Contexts: "The Modernist Lyrics of H.D. and Mina Loy"
Hilary Clark

No course description available at this time.

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