Proverbs and proverbial materials in Saxo's Gesta Danorum.

Edition used.  J. Olrik and H. Ræder. Saxonis Gesta Danorum.  Copenhagen, 1931.
Others.   
Translations.
  Saxo Grammaticus. The History of the Danes. Books I-IX.   Tr. Peter Fisher, ed. and commentary Hilda Ellis Davidson. Cambridge, 1979-80.  Repr. one volume Woodbridge, Suffolk. 1996, 2002.
Anders Sørensen Vedel.  Den Danske krønicke. Copenhagen, 1575, facs. edn. Copenhagen, 1967.
J. Olrik tr 1908-1912.

Others.    The First Nine Books of the Danish History of Saxo Grammaticus.  Tr. Oliver Elton. With some considerations on Saxo's Sources, Historical Methods, and Folkore[including 9.--Saws and Proverbs], by Frederick York Powell. London, 1894.
Other materials.  
Karen Friis-Jensen, ed. Saxo Grammaticus. A Medieval Author Between Norse and Latin Culture. Museum Tusculanum Press. Copenhagen, 1981.
Gottfrid Kallstenius, "Nordiska ordspråk hos Saxo samlade av Gottfrid Kallstenius" Studier til Axel Kock, ANF (Tillagsband til bd. 40 (NF) Lund 1929) 16-31.

Axel Olrik, Kilderne til Sakses oldhistorie; and literatur-historisk undersögelse, 2 vols. Copenhagen, 1892-4. Also in Aarbøger f. nordisk Oldkyndighed og Historie (2) 7, pp. 1-134.
Rosenberg, Nordboernes Aandsliv II (1880) 600.

Stephani Johannis Stephanii. Notæ uberiores in historiam danicam Saxonis Grammatici.   Sorø 1645.  Facs., intro. H. D. Schepelern. Museum Tusculanum Press. Copenhagen, 1978. Contains references to comments by Bishop Brynjólfur Sveinsson

Editorial comment.   For the purposes of this Concordance, book V is of special interest, the adventures of Ericus disertus, Eric the Eloquent, whose rhetorical powers rely heavily on the paroemial side of phraseological skills. It is difficult to ascertain the seriousness with which Saxo presents this character, but there are impressive affinities with the proverbial inventory of the Icelandic sagas.    THIS FILE IS IN THE EARLY STAGES OF ITS DEVELOPMENT.

1.

O-R Liber primus. 14. IV. 3. Conspicor invisum regi venisse gigantem/et gressu medias obtenebrare vias,/aut oculis fallor; nam tegmine sæpe ferino/contigit audaces delituisse viros.
PF Book I. 16.  Gro speaks to Bess:
"Can it be the giant, loathsome to the king,/shadowing with his steps the middle of the road?/Yet bold warriors have frequently concealed themselves beneath the pelts of beasts."13      HED 28:  13Stephanius (p. 34) gives an Icelandic parallel to this: Oft eru vaskar hendur undir vargs belgie (Manly hands may often be hidden under a wolfskin.) See Gering, Ark nord Fil 28 (N.F. 1916) p. 22 and Book II, note 16.
Gering. 22. kápa. – 68. opt eru vaskar hendr undir vándri kápu. 'in einem schlechten mantel stcken oft starke arme'. Nur neuisländ. belegt (Müller zu Saxo 28512; Guðm. Jónsson 2578), aber als alt erwiesen durch Saxos übersetzung: vili interdum amiculo validae subsunt manus.

O-R Liber primus. 16. IV. 7. Namque petenti/aspera primum/difficilisque/sæpe secundo/femina cedit.
PF Book I. 18. Bess answering Gro:
. . . 16   . . . /"A stubborn woman,/harshly refusing/her wooer at first,/will often yield when/the plea is repeated."     HED 28: 16The second part of this stanza seems to be another proverbial utterance, and Stephanius (p. 35) gives a parallel from Icelandic: Byst er brúður að fyrstu biðli, en viknar siðan (The bride is angry at the first offer, but gives way later on).

O-R Liber primus. 34. VIII. 25. Malo præterea virum regnare quam patrem. Malo regis coniunx quam nata censeri. Melius est principem interius amplecti quam exterius venerari, gloriosius nubere regi quam obsequi. Ipse quoque tibi sceptrum quam socero malle debeas. Proximum sibi quemque natura constituit. Aderit cœpto facultas, si facto voluntas accesserit. Nihil est quod non ingenio cedat. Instaurandum epulum est, exornandum convivium, providendi paratus, invitandus socer. Fraudi viam familiaritas simulata præstabit. Nullo melius quam affinitatis nomine insidiæ teguntur.
PF Book I. 34. Ulvild incites her husband, Guthorm, to murder her father, Hading:
"I had rather my husband were monarch, not my parent; I had rather be rated a ruler's wife, not his daughter. It is better to enjoy the close caresses of the sovereign than pay homage to him at a distance, more glorious to be the bride of majesty than its parasite. You should prefer your hand to hold the sceptre rather than his. Nature has made each man his own best friend. You won't lack opportunity if the will to do it is there. All things give way to sharp wits.68 We must hold a celebration, provide a banquet, make the necessary preparations and invite my father. Fake intimacy will pave the way to deception since the name of kinsman is the very best cover for a trap."     HED 38:  68Kallstenius (p. 18, no. 3) notes an Icelandic parallel to the first of these proverbial sayings: Hvör er sjálfum sèr nœstr. (Everyone is nearest to himself.) cf. the English proverb: A man is his own best friend. The next two sentences appear to be two versions of another proverb, for which Kallstenius gives no northern parallel, similar to the English proverb: Where there´s a will there´s a way.
FJ Proverb word 101. Page 81. fara – verðr hverr með sjálfum sér lengst at fara Gísl 25. ‘Enhver må fare (gå) længst med (i forbindelse med) sig selv’, omtr. = enhver er sig selv nærmest. Jfr Aasen: “Ein kann fara kvart ein vil, ein fer ikkje frå sig sjölv, el. Det fer ingen burt frå sig sölv”.
ÍM 285. SJÁLFUR Hver situr sjálfum sér næst. Hsch Hver er sjálfum sér næstur. Ísl. Sendibr. I 171.
Saxo (Kallstenius) 18. 3. Egoism. Proximum sibi quemque natura constituit, s. 3610. – Hvör er sjálfum sèr næstr, GJ2. – Se även n:r 23 och 24 nedan.
TPMA 10.   389.  SELBST/soi-même/(one)self  2. Verhältnis zu sich selbst 2.4. Sich (nur) mit sich selbst befassen  Nord. 5 Hverr skal þegn . . . sjalfan Sik lengst hafa miklu Jeder soll sich weitaus am längsten sich selbst widmen SIGVATR 13, 20.  6 Verðr hverr með sjálfum sér lengst at fara Ein jeder hat am längsten mit sich selbst zu tun GÍSLA SAGA 14K, 12 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 101. JÓNSSON 39). Vgl. JEDER 1.1., SORGE 3.1.1.
Ed. note. See also TPMA 6. 363. JEDER/chaque, chacun/every, everybody  3. Aussagen zur Charakterisierung von jedermann 3.1. Allgemeine Gleichheit von jedermann 3.1.1. Einstellung zu sich selbst und sum Eigenen 3.1.1.2. Für sich selbst und das Eigene sorgen 3.1.1.2.3. Jeder begünstigt die Seinen  Nord. 45 Hwar ær sina wilda win Jeder is der Seinigen Herzenfreund KONUNGASTYRELSEN (um 1330 [ACTA PHILOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA 18, 463]).

O-R Liber primus. 34. VIII. 25. Malo præterea virum regnare quam patrem. Malo regis coniunx quam nata censeri. Melius est principem interius amplecti quam exterius venerari, gloriosius nubere regi quam obsequi. Ipse quoque tibi sceptrum quam socero malle debeas. Proximum sibi quemque natura constituit. Aderit cœpto facultas, si facto voluntas accesserit. Nihil est quod non ingenio cedat. Instaurandum epulum est, exornandum convivium, providendi paratus, invitandus socer. Fraudi viam familiaritas simulata præstabit. Nullo melius quam affinitatis nomine insidiæ teguntur.
PF Book I. 34. Ulvild incites her husband, Guthorm, to murder her father, Hading:
"I had rather my husband were monarch, not my parent; I had rather be rated a ruler's wife, not his daughter. It is better to enjoy the close caresses of the sovereign than pay homage to him at a distance, more glorious to be the bride of majesty than its parasite. You should prefer your hand to hold the sceptre rather than his. Nature has made each man his own best friend. You won't lack opportunity if the will to do it is there. All things give way to sharp wits.68 We must hold a celebration, provide a banquet, make the necessary preparations and invite my father. Fake intimacy will pave the way to deception since the name of kinsman is the very best cover for a trap."     HED 38: 68Kallstenius (p. 18, no. 3) notes an Icelandic parallel to the first of these proverbial sayings: Hvör er sjálfum sèr nœstr. (Everyone is nearest to himself.) cf. the English proverb: A man is his own best friend. The next two sentences appear to be two versions of another proverb, for which Kallstenius gives no northern parallel, similar to the English proverb: Where there´s a will there´s a way.

O-R Liber primus. 34. VIII. 25. Malo præterea virum regnare quam patrem. Malo regis coniunx quam nata censeri. Melius est principem interius amplecti quam exterius venerari, gloriosius nubere regi quam obsequi. Ipse quoque tibi sceptrum quam socero malle debeas. Proximum sibi quemque natura constituit. Aderit cœpto facultas, si facto voluntas accesserit. Nihil est quod non ingenio cedat. Instaurandum epulum est, exornandum convivium, providendi paratus, invitandus socer. Fraudi viam familiaritas simulata præstabit. Nullo melius quam affinitatis nomine insidiæ teguntur.
PF Book I. 34. Ulvild incites her husband, Guthorm, to murder her father, Hading:

"I had rather my husband were monarch, not my parent; I had rather be rated a ruler's wife, not his daughter. It is better to enjoy the close caresses of the sovereign than pay homage to him at a distance, more glorious to be the bride of majesty than its parasite. You should prefer your hand to hold the sceptre rather than his. Nature has made each man his own best friend. You won't lack opportunity if the will to do it is there. All things give way to sharp wits.68 We must hold a celebration, provide a banquet, make the necessary preparations and invite my father. Fake intimacy will pave the way to deception since the name of kinsman is the very best cover for a trap."     HED 38: 68Kallstenius (p. 18, no. 3) notes an Icelandic parallel to the first of these proverbial sayings: Hvör er sjálfum sèr nœstr. (Everyone is nearest to himself.) cf. the English proverb: A man is his own best friend. The next two sentences appear to be two versions of another proverb, for which Kallstenius gives no northern parallel, similar to the English proverb: Where there's a will there's a way.

2.

O-R Liber secundus. 41. II. Servitutem itaque non semper virilitate vacuam reperiri subiunxit; sæpe enim sordido cultu robustam obtegi manum, fortemque dextram atra veste concludi interdum; itaque naturæ vitium virtute redimi damnumque generis animi ingenuitate pensari. Se ergo, Thor deo excepto, nullam monstrigenæ virtutis potentiam expavere, cuius virium magnitudini nihil humanarum divinarumve rerum digna possit æquilitate conferri.
PF Book II. 44.
Regner answers Svanhvita, who has seen his excellence beneath his humble clothing:
He therefore went on to say that servitude is not always devoid of manliness; shabby and grimy clothes often envelop a stout arm,16 and poor circumstances are redeemed by bravery, deficiency in birth recompensed by freedom of spirit. Consequently he was afraid of no supernatural power save that of the god Thor,17 to whose vast strength nothing human or divine could reasonably be compared.   HED 41:  16The same proverb is quoted by Saxo in Book VI (note 61) and Stephanius (p. 67) gives an Icdelandic parallel (see Book I, note 13). cf. Kallstenius, p. 20, no. 13.     17Saxo uses the name of Thor directly here, without replacing it by Jupiter or Hercules. No special link between Regner and the cult of the god is however indicated in the story.

O-R Liber secundus. 41. II. Servitutem itaque non semper virilitate vacuam reperiri subiunxit; sæpe enim sordido cultu robustam obtegi manum, fortemque dextram atra veste concludi interdum; itaque naturæ vitium virtute redimi damnumque generis animi ingenuitate pensari. Se ergo, Thor deo excepto, nullam monstrigenæ virtutis potentiam expavere, cuius virium magnitudini nihil humanarum divinarumve rerum digna possit æquilitate conferri.
PF Book II. 44.
Regner answers Svanhvita, who has seen his excellence beneath his humble clothing:
He therefore went on to say that servitude is not always devoid of manliness; shabby and grimy clothes often envelop a stout arm,16 and poor circumstances are redeemed by bravery, deficiency in birth recompensed by freedom of spirit. Consequently he was afraid of no supernatural power save that of the god Thor,17 to whose vast strength nothing human or divine could reasonably be compared.   HED 41:  16The same proverb is quoted by Saxo in Book VI (note 61) and Stephanius (p. 67) gives an Icdelandic parallel (see Book I, note 13). cf. Kallstenius, p. 20, no. 13.     17Saxo uses the name of Thor directly here, without replacing it by Jupiter or Hercules. No special link between Regner and the cult of the god is however indicated in the story.

O-R Liber secundus. 41. II. Servitutem itaque non semper virilitate vacuam reperiri subiunxit; sæpe enim sordido cultu robustam obtegi manum, fortemque dextram atra veste concludi interdum; itaque naturæ vitium virtute redimi damnumque generis animi ingenuitate pensari. Se ergo, Thor deo excepto, nullam monstrigenæ virtutis potentiam expavere, cuius virium magnitudini nihil humanarum divinarumve rerum digna possit æquilitate conferri.
PF Book II. 44.
Regner answers Svanhvita, who has seen his excellence beneath his humble clothing:
He therefore went on to say that servitude is not always devoid of manliness; shabby and grimy clothes often envelop a stout arm,16 and poor circumstances are redeemed by bravery, deficiency in birth recompensed by freedom of spirit. Consequently he was afraid of no supernatural power save that of the god Thor,17 to whose vast strength nothing human or divine could reasonably be compared.   HED 41:  16The same proverb is quoted by Saxo in Book VI (note 61) and Stephanius (p. 67) gives an Icdelandic parallel (see Book I, note 13). cf. Kallstenius, p. 20, no. 13.     17Saxo uses the name of Thor directly here, without replacing it by Jupiter or Hercules. No special link between Regner and the cult of the god is however indicated in the story.

O-R Liber secundus. 41. II. Servitutem itaque non semper virilitate vacuam reperiri subiunxit; sæpe enim sordido cultu robustam obtegi manum, fortemque dextram atra veste concludi interdum; itaque naturæ vitium virtute redimi damnumque generis animi ingenuitate pensari. Se ergo, Thor deo excepto, nullam monstrigenæ virtutis potentiam expavere, cuius virium magnitudini nihil humanarum divinarumve rerum digna possit æquilitate conferri.
PF Book II. 44.
Regner answers Svanhvita, who has seen his excellence beneath his humble clothing:
He therefore went on to say that servitude is not always devoid of manliness; shabby and grimy clothes often envelop a stout arm,16 and poor circumstances are redeemed by bravery, deficiency in birth recompensed by freedom of spirit. Consequently he was afraid of no supernatural power save that of the god Thor,17 to whose vast strength nothing human or divine could reasonably be compared.   HED 41: 16The same proverb is quoted by Saxo in Book VI (note 61) and Stephanius (p. 67) gives an Icdelandic parallel (see Book I, note 13). cf. Kallstenius, p. 20, no. 13.     17Saxo uses the name of Thor directly here, without replacing it by Jupiter or Hercules. No special link between Regner and the cult of the god is however indicated in the story.

3.

4.

5.

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 5. Ad hæc Frotho, repugnandi ratione pertinacius quæsita, a patre didicisse se refert non expedire regibus e longinquo copulam peti nec Venerem nisi a finitimis posci.
PF Book V. 119.
  Frothi objects to the wooing of the King of the Hun's daughter for his wife:
When he withstood this proposal and they pushed him for his reasons, he replied that his father had taught him kings should not look to distant lands for their partners; love should only be demanded from neighbours.

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 5. Ad hæc Frotho, repugnandi ratione pertinacius quæsita, a patre didicisse se refert non expedire regibus e longinquo copulam peti nec Venerem nisi a finitimis posci.
PF Book V. 119.
  Frothi objects to the wooing of the King of the Hun's daughter for his wife:
When he withstood this proposal and they pushed him for his reasons, he replied that his father had taught him kings should not look to distant lands for their partners; love should only be demanded from neighbours.

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 6.  "Iunioribus, . . . nuptiææ competunt; senes sepulcrum manet. Adolexcenti gressus votis fortunaque proficiunt; inops ad bustum senecta devergit. Spes iuventam consequitur; senium exspes inclinat occasus. Adolescit sors puberum, numquam infectum omissura quod cœpit."
PF Book V.  119.
Gøtvara, of persuasive tongue, uses rhetoric to sway Frothi towards the King of the Huns' daughter:
"A wedding suits a younger person; only funerals await the old. Youth strides forward in its desires and in success, while helpless age sinks into the grave. Hope attends a stripling but the ancient are bowed by inexorable death. A boy's fortune matures with him and will never leave unfinished what it has begun."

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 6. "Iunioribus, . . . nuptiææ competunt; senes sepulcrum manet. Adolexcenti gressus votis fortunaque proficiunt; inops ad bustum senecta devergit. Spes iuventam consequitur; senium exspes inclinat occasus. Adolescit sors puberum, numquam infectum omissura quod cœpit."
PF Book V.  119.
Gøtvara, of persuasive tongue, uses rhetoric to sway Frothi towards the King of the Huns' daughter:
"A wedding suits a younger person; only funerals await the old. Youth strides forward in its desires and in success, while helpless age sinks into the grave. Hope attends a stripling but the ancient are bowed by inexorable death. A boy's fortune matures with him and will never leave unfinished what it has begun."

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 6. "Iunioribus, . . . nuptiææ competunt; senes sepulcrum manet. Adolexcenti gressus votis fortunaque proficiunt; inops ad bustum senecta devergit. Spes iuventam consequitur; senium exspes inclinat occasus. Adolescit sors puberum, numquam infectum omissura quod cœpit."
PF Book V.  119.
Gøtvara, of persuasive tongue, uses rhetoric to sway Frothi towards the King of the Huns' daughter:
"A wedding suits a younger person; only funerals await the old. Youth strides forward in its desires and in success, while helpless age sinks into the grave. Hope attends a stripling but the ancient are bowed by inexorable death. A boy's fortune matures with him and will never leave unfinished what it has begun."

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 6. "Iunioribus, . . . nuptiææ competunt; senes sepulcrum manet. Adolexcenti gressus votis fortunaque proficiunt; inops ad bustum senecta devergit. Spes iuventam consequitur; senium exspes inclinat occasus. Adolescit sors puberum, numquam infectum omissura quod cœpit."
PF Book V.  119.
Gøtvara, of persuasive tongue, uses rhetoric to sway Frothi towards the King of the Huns' daughter:
"A wedding suits a younger person; only funerals await the old. Youth strides forward in its desires and in success, while helpless age sinks into the grave. Hope attends a stripling but the ancient are bowed by inexorable death. A boy's fortune matures with him and will never leave unfinished what it has begun."

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 6. "Iunioribus, . . . nuptiææ competunt; senes sepulcrum manet. Adolexcenti gressus votis fortunaque proficiunt; inops ad bustum senecta devergit. Spes iuventam consequitur; senium exspes inclinat occasus. Adolescit sors puberum, numquam infectum omissura quod cœpit."
PF Book V.  119.
Gøtvara, of persuasive tongue, uses rhetoric to sway Frothi towards the King of the Huns' daughter:
"A wedding suits a younger person; only funerals await the old. Youth strides forward in its desires and in success, while helpless age sinks into the grave. Hope attends a stripling but the ancient are bowed by inexorable death. A boy's fortune matures with him and will never leave unfinished what it has begun."

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 6. "Iunioribus, . . . nuptiææ competunt; senes sepulcrum manet. Adolexcenti gressus votis fortunaque proficiunt; inops ad bustum senecta devergit. Spes iuventam consequitur; senium exspes inclinat occasus. Adolescit sors puberum, numquam infectum omissura quod cœpit."
PF Book V.  119.
Gøtvara, of persuasive tongue, uses rhetoric to sway Frothi towards the King of the Huns' daughter:
"A wedding suits a younger person; only funerals await the old. Youth strides forward in its desires and in success, while helpless age sinks into the grave. Hope attends a stripling but the ancient are bowed by inexorable death. A boy's fortune matures with him and will never leave unfinished what it has begun."

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 6. "Iunioribus, . . . nuptiææ competunt; senes sepulcrum manet. Adolexcenti gressus votis fortunaque proficiunt; inops ad bustum senecta devergit. Spes iuventam consequitur; senium exspes inclinat occasus. Adolescit sors puberum, numquam infectum omissura quod cœpit."
PF Book V.  119.
Gøtvara, of persuasive tongue, uses rhetoric to sway Frothi towards the King of the Huns' daughter:
"A wedding suits a younger person; only funerals await the old. Youth strides forward in its desires and in success, while helpless age sinks into the grave. Hope attends a stripling but the ancient are bowed by inexorable death. A boy's fortune matures with him and will never leave unfinished what it has begun."

O-R Liber quintus. 105. I. 6. "Iunioribus, . . . nuptiææ competunt; senes sepulcrum manet. Adolexcenti gressus votis fortunaque proficiunt; inops ad bustum senecta devergit. Spes iuventam consequitur; senium exspes inclinat occasus. Adolescit sors puberum, numquam infectum omissura quod cœpit."
PF Book V.  119.
Gøtvara, of persuasive tongue, uses rhetoric to sway Frothi towards the King of the Huns' daughter:
"A wedding suits a younger person; only funerals await the old. Youth strides forward in its desires and in success, while helpless age sinks into the grave. Hope attends a stripling but the ancient are bowed by inexorable death. A boy's fortune matures with him and will never leave unfinished what it has begun."

O-R Liber quintus. 106. I. 9. Contra rex non decere ait amplitudinem regiam, quem honore præcelleret, æquare conflictu, nec oportere dignitate impares pugnæ paritate conferri.
PF Book V.  120.
 The King of the Huns objects when Vestmar holds his sword to his throat to get pemission for his daughter to marry Frothi:
The monarch for his part asserted that it was unfitting for his own royal grandeur to be matched in conflict with one of inferiour rank; for those of unequal authority to fight on equal terms was undignified.

O-R Liber quintus. 106. I. 9. Ita Westmarus ad præcordialem puellæ sententiam relegatus, sciens feminam omnem ut volubilis animi, ita versilis esse propositi, tanto rem fidentius exsequi cœpit, quanto virginum votis plus varietatis inesse compertum habuit. Auxit curæ eius fiduciam adiecitque studio spem simplicitas virginis proprio permissa consilio libertasque feminæ politioribus blanditiarum delenimentis palpanda, non modo abduci facilis, verum etiam obsequi præceps.
PF Book V.  120.
 Vestmar goes to discover the princess's own desires in this matter:
Referred in this way to the sentiments of the princess's heart, Vestmar, knowing that every female has a veering mind and shifting aims, began to seek his goal with more confidence, inasmuch as he was aware how changeable a maid's wishes can be. His assurance in the task increased and hope attached to his endeavours by the artlessness of a girl left to her own decision; a woman free to be coaxed by smooth, flattering compliments would be easily led and quick to comply.

O-R Liber quintus. 106. I. 9. Ita Westmarus ad præcordialem puellæ sententiam relegatus, sciens feminam omnem ut volubilis animi, ita versilis esse propositi, tanto rem fidentius exsequi cœpit, quanto virginum votis plus varietatis inesse compertum habuit. Auxit curæ eius fiduciam adiecitque studio spem simplicitas virginis proprio permissa consilio libertasque feminæ politioribus blanditiarum delenimentis palpanda, non modo abduci facilis, verum etiam obsequi præceps.
PF Book V.  120.
 Vestmar goes to discover the princess's own desires in this matter:
Referred in this way to the sentiments of the princess's heart, Vestmar, knowing that every female has a veering mind and shifting aims, began to seek his goal with more confidence, inasmuch as he was aware how changeable a maid's wishes can be. His assurance in the task increased and hope attached to his endeavours by the artlessness of a girl left to her own decision; a woman free to be coaxed by smooth, flattering compliments would be easily led and quick to comply.
Kålund 158. no. 97. ja er meyiar nei astenn minn

O-R Liber quintus. 106. I. 9. Ita Westmarus ad præcordialem puellæ sententiam relegatus, sciens feminam omnem ut volubilis animi, ita versilis esse propositi, tanto rem fidentius exsequi cœpit, quanto virginum votis plus varietatis inesse compertum habuit. Auxit curæ eius fiduciam adiecitque studio spem simplicitas virginis proprio permissa consilio libertasque feminæ politioribus blanditiarum delenimentis palpanda, non modo abduci facilis, verum etiam obsequi præceps.
PF Book V.  120.
 Vestmar goes to discover the princess's own desires in this matter:
Referred in this way to the sentiments of the princess's heart, Vestmar, knowing that every female has a veering mind and shifting aims, began to seek his goal with more confidence, inasmuch as he was aware how changeable a maid's wishes can be. His assurance in the task increased and hope attached to his endeavours by the artlessness of a girl left to her own decision; a woman free to be coaxed by smooth, flattering compliments would be easily led and quick to comply.

O-R Liber quintus. 106-7. I. 10. Illa prius in amorem proci latenti potionis operatione perducta, plura se de Frothonis indole referebat spe præsumpsisse quam fama, quippe cum is ab illustri genus parente duxerit, naturaque omnis suæ soleat origini respondere.
PF Book V.  121.
 The princess is seduced also by the love potion concocted by Gøtvara:
Drawn into loving her suitor by the secret workings of the philtre, she answered that she expected more from Frothi's talents in the future than his present reputation indicated; he came of a famous father and every man's nature tended to reflect his birth.

O-R Liber quintus. 107. I. 11. Convenis hospitibusque receptuum loco convicia præbebantur. Tot ludibriorum irritamenta a petulantibus et lascivis reperta sunt. Adeo sub rege puero temeritas libertate nutrita est. Nihil enim tantum peccandi licentiam protrahit quantum ultionis pœnæque dilatio.
PF Book V.  121.  Married to Hanunda, Frothi neglects his rule, and Denmark sinks into chaos:

Guests and strangers were treated to abuse instead of a welcome; so many were the scornful provocations found among this lewd and impudent crew, for under a boy-king freedom fostered recklessness. Nothing prolongs open sin as much as the postponement of due vengeance.

O-R Liber quintus. 108. II. 2. Tum exsurgens Ericus contraria rem allegatione prohibuit: "Sæpe," inquiens, "alieni appetitores proprio privari solere meminimus. Sæpe amborum captator utriusque perditor fuit. Prævalidum enim oportet alitem esse, qui prædam alius unguibus extrahere cupiat. Animat te frustra internus regionis livor, quem plerumque hostilis explodit adventus. Nam etsi nunc Dani dividuis esse sententiis videantur, unanimes tamen mox excipient hostem. Crebro corrixantes porcos conciliavere lupi. Patrium quisque ducem extero præfert. Provincia omnis regem domesticum quam advenam impensius colit. Neque enim te Frotho domi præstolabitur, sed foris excipiet adventantem. Extremis se aquilæ scalpunt, anterius alites certant. Nosti ipse pænitentia vacuum debere consultum esse prudentis. Proceribus abunde stiparis; tua tibi quies maneat; per alios gerendi sane belli facultatem propemodum exploratam habere poteris. Liceat militi regiam prætentare fortunam; salutem tuam pacifice moderare, alieno negotium periculo moliturus. Satius est servum deperire quam herum. Quod fabro forceps, tuus tibi satelles agat: ille ferramenti remedio manus cauterium cavet atque a digitorum sibi incendio temperat; tu quoque tibi tuorum opera parcere et consulere disce."
PF Book V.  122.  Gøtar, king of the Norwegians, plans to invade Denmark in its discontent, but Erik, unintroduced in the text, makes his first eloquent speech:

"We can recall how people who grasp at someone else's goods are frequently stripped of their own, and in an attempt to seize double wealth have lost everything. It needs a powerful bird to wrest the prey from another's claws. You are rashly optimistic at the internal dissatisfaction in that area; usually in such cases an enemy incursion dispels it. Although the Danes now appear to be divided in their motives, they will soon unite in the face of an invader. Squabbling pigs often form a solid front when threatened by wolves. As every man prefers a fellow-countryman to a foreigner for his leader, so every state cherishes its native prince more dearly than a stranger. Frothi will not stand about waiting in his palace but will sally for to intercept your arrival. Eagles tear at one another with beaks and talons. You know yourself a wise man's plan must leave no room for regrets."

O-R Liber quintus. 108. II. 2. Tum exsurgens Ericus contraria rem allegatione prohibuit: "Sæpe," inquiens, "alieni appetitores proprio privari solere meminimus. Sæpe amborum captator utriusque perditor fuit. Prævalidum enim oportet alitem esse, qui prædam alius unguibus extrahere cupiat. Animat te frustra internus regionis livor, quem plerumque hostilis explodit adventus. Nam etsi nunc Dani dividuis esse sententiis videantur, unanimes tamen mox excipient hostem. Crebro corrixantes porcos conciliavere lupi. Patrium quisque ducem extero præfert. Provincia omnis regem domesticum quam advenam impensius colit. Neque enim te Frotho domi præstolabitur, sed foris excipiet adventantem. Extremis se aquilæ scalpunt, anterius alites certant. Nosti ipse pænitentia vacuum debere consultum esse prudentis. Proceribus abunde stiparis; tua tibi quies maneat; per alios gerendi sane belli facultatem propemodum exploratam habere poteris. Liceat militi regiam prætentare fortunam; salutem tuam pacifice moderare, alieno negotium periculo moliturus. Satius est servum deperire quam herum. Quod fabro forceps, tuus tibi satelles agat: ille ferramenti remedio manus cauterium cavet atque a digitorum sibi incendio temperat; tu quoque tibi tuorum opera parcere et consulere disce."
PF Book V.  122.  Gøtar, king of the Norwegians, plans to invade Denmark in its discontent, but Erik, unintroduced in the text, makes his first eloquent speech:

"We can recall how people who grasp at someone else's goods are frequently stripped of their own, and in an attempt to seize double wealth have lost everything. It needs a powerful bird to wrest the prey from another's claws. You are rashly optimistic at the internal dissatisfaction in that area; usually in such cases an enemy incursion dispels it. Although the Danes now appear to be divided in their motives, they will soon unite in the face of an invader. Squabbling pigs often form a solid front when threatened by wolves. As every man prefers a fellow-countryman to a foreigner for his leader, so every state cherishes its native prince more dearly than a stranger. Frothi will not stand about waiting in his palace but will sally forth to intercept your arrival. Eagles tear at one another with beaks and talons. You know yourself a wise man's plan must leave no room for regrets."

O-R Liber quintus. 108. II. 2. Tum exsurgens Ericus contraria rem allegatione prohibuit: "Sæpe," inquiens, "alieni appetitores proprio privari solere meminimus. Sæpe amborum captator utriusque perditor fuit. Prævalidum enim oportet alitem esse, qui prædam alius unguibus extrahere cupiat. Animat te frustra internus regionis livor, quem plerumque hostilis explodit adventus. Nam etsi nunc Dani dividuis esse sententiis videantur, unanimes tamen mox excipient hostem. Crebro corrixantes porcos conciliavere lupi. Patrium quisque ducem extero præfert. Provincia omnis regem domesticum quam advenam impensius colit. Neque enim te Frotho domi præstolabitur, sed foris excipiet adventantem. Extremis se aquilæ scalpunt, anterius alites certant. Nosti ipse pænitentia vacuum debere consultum esse prudentis. Proceribus abunde stiparis; tua tibi quies maneat; per alios gerendi sane belli facultatem propemodum exploratam habere poteris. Liceat militi regiam prætentare fortunam; salutem tuam pacifice moderare, alieno negotium periculo moliturus. Satius est servum deperire quam herum. Quod fabro forceps, tuus tibi satelles agat: ille ferramenti remedio manus cauterium cavet atque a digitorum sibi incendio temperat; tu quoque tibi tuorum opera parcere et consulere disce."
PF Book V.  122.  Gøtar, king of the Norwegians, plans to invade Denmark in its discontent, but Erik, unintroduced in the text, makes his first eloquent speech:

"We can recall how people who grasp at someone else's goods are frequently stripped of their own, and in an attempt to seize double wealth have lost everything. It needs a powerful bird to wrest the prey from another's claws. You are rashly optimistic at the internal dissatisfaction in that area; usually in such cases an enemy incursion dispels it. Although the Danes now appear to be divided in their motives, they will soon unite in the face of an invader. Squabbling pigs often form a solid front when threatened by wolves. As every man prefers a fellow-countryman to a foreigner for his leader, so every state cherishes its native prince more dearly than a stranger. Frothi will not stand about waiting in his palace but will sally forth to intercept your arrival. Eagles tear at one another with beaks and talons. You know yourself a wise man's plan must leave no room for regrets."

O-R Liber quintus. 108. II. 2. Tum exsurgens Ericus contraria rem allegatione prohibuit: "Sæpe," inquiens, "alieni appetitores proprio privari solere meminimus. Sæpe amborum captator utriusque perditor fuit. Prævalidum enim oportet alitem esse, qui prædam alius unguibus extrahere cupiat. Animat te frustra internus regionis livor, quem plerumque hostilis explodit adventus. Nam etsi nunc Dani dividuis esse sententiis videantur, unanimes tamen mox excipient hostem. Crebro corrixantes porcos conciliavere lupi. Patrium quisque ducem extero præfert. Provincia omnis regem domesticum quam advenam impensius colit. Neque enim te Frotho domi præstolabitur, sed foris excipiet adventantem. Extremis se aquilæ scalpunt, anterius alites certant. Nosti ipse pænitentia vacuum debere consultum esse prudentis. Proceribus abunde stiparis; tua tibi quies maneat; per alios gerendi sane belli facultatem propemodum exploratam habere poteris. Liceat militi regiam prætentare fortunam; salutem tuam pacifice moderare, alieno negotium periculo moliturus. Satius est servum deperire quam herum. Quod fabro forceps, tuus tibi satelles agat: ille ferramenti remedio manus cauterium cavet atque a digitorum sibi incendio temperat; tu quoque tibi tuorum opera parcere et consulere disce."
PF Book V.  122.  Gøtar, king of the Norwegians, plans to invade Denmark in its discontent, but Erik, unintroduced in the text, makes his first eloquent speech:

"We can recall how people who grasp at someone else's goods are frequently stripped of their own, and in an attempt to seize double wealth have lost everything. It needs a powerful bird to wrest the prey from another's claws. You are rashly optimistic at the internal dissatisfaction in that area; usually in such cases an enemy incursion dispels it. Although the Danes now appear to be divided in their motives, they will soon unite in the face of an invader. Squabbling pigs often form a solid front when threatened by wolves. As every man prefers a fellow-countryman to a foreigner for his leader, so every state cherishes its native prince more dearly than a stranger. Frothi will not stand about waiting in his palace but will sally forth to intercept your arrival. Eagles tear at one another with beaks and talons. You know yourself a wise man's plan must leave no room for regrets."

O-R Liber quintus. 108. II. 2. Tum exsurgens Ericus contraria rem allegatione prohibuit: "Sæpe," inquiens, "alieni appetitores proprio privari solere meminimus. Sæpe amborum captator utriusque perditor fuit. Prævalidum enim oportet alitem esse, qui prædam alius unguibus extrahere cupiat. Animat te frustra internus regionis livor, quem plerumque hostilis explodit adventus. Nam etsi nunc Dani dividuis esse sententiis videantur, unanimes tamen mox excipient hostem. Crebro corrixantes porcos conciliavere lupi. Patrium quisque ducem extero præfert. Provincia omnis regem domesticum quam advenam impensius colit. Neque enim te Frotho domi præstolabitur, sed foris excipiet adventantem. Extremis se aquilæ scalpunt, anterius alites certant. Nosti ipse pænitentia vacuum debere consultum esse prudentis."
PF Book V.  122.  Gøtar, king of the Norwegians, plans to invade Denmark in its discontent, but Erik, unintroduced in the text, makes his first eloquent speech:

"We can recall how people who grasp at someone else's goods are frequently stripped of their own, and in an attempt to seize double wealth have lost everything. It needs a powerful bird to wrest the prey from another's claws. You are rashly optimistic at the internal dissatisfaction in that area; usually in such cases an enemy incursion dispels it. Although the Danes now appear to be divided in their motives, they will soon unite in the face of an invader. Squabbling pigs often form a solid front when threatened by wolves. As every man prefers a fellow-countryman to a foreigner for his leader, so every state cherishes its native prince more dearly than a stranger. Frothi will not stand about waiting in his palace but will sally forth to intercept your arrival. Eagles tear at one another with beaks and talons. You know yourself a wise man's plan must leave no room for regrets."

O-R Liber quintus. 108. II. 2. Tum exsurgens Ericus contraria rem allegatione prohibuit: "Sæpe," inquiens, "alieni appetitores proprio privari solere meminimus. Sæpe amborum captator utriusque perditor fuit. Prævalidum enim oportet alitem esse, qui prædam alius unguibus extrahere cupiat. Animat te frustra internus regionis livor, quem plerumque hostilis explodit adventus. Nam etsi nunc Dani dividuis esse sententiis videantur, unanimes tamen mox excipient hostem. Crebro corrixantes porcos conciliavere lupi. Patrium quisque ducem extero præfert. Provincia omnis regem domesticum quam advenam impensius colit. Neque enim te Frotho domi præstolabitur, sed foris excipiet adventantem. Extremis se aquilæ scalpunt, anterius alites certant. Nosti ipse pænitentia vacuum debere consultum esse prudentis.
PF Book V.  122.  Gøtar, king of the Norwegians, plans to invade Denmark in its discontent, but Erik, unintroduced in the text, makes his first eloquent speech:

"We can recall how people who grasp at someone else's goods are frequently stripped of their own, and in an attempt to seize double wealth have lost everything. It needs a powerful bird to wrest the prey from another's claws. You are rashly optimistic at the internal dissatisfaction in that area; usually in such cases an enemy incursion dispels it. Although the Danes now appear to be divided in their motives, they will soon unite in the face of an invader. Squabbling pigs often form a solid front when threatened by wolves. As every man prefers a fellow-countryman to a foreigner for his leader, so every state cherishes its native prince more dearly than a stranger. Frothi will not stand about waiting in his palace but will sally forth to intercept your arrival. Eagles tear at one another with beaks and talons. You know yourself a wise man's plan must leave no room for regrets."

O-R Liber quintus. 108. II. 2. Proceribus abunde stiparis; tua tibi quies maneat; per alios gerendi sane belli facultatem propemodum exploratam habere poteris. Liceat militi regiam prætentare fortunam; salutem tuam pacifice moderare, alieno negotium periculo moliturus. Satius est servum deperire quam herum. Quod fabro forceps, tuus tibi satelles agat: ille ferramenti remedio manus cauterium cavet atque a digitorum sibi incendio temperat; tu quoque tibi tuorum opera parcere et consulere disce."
PF Book V.  122.
 Erik continues his speech:
"A large body of nobles forms your entourage; keep your quiet life; others fairly certainly will give you a chance to discover your military potential. Let your soldiers make a preliminary test of their king's fortune; control your own safety by being a non-combatant, and if you should set this sceme in motion, leave other men to take the risks.  It's better for a slave to perish than his lord. Your retainer should serve you as tongs do a blacksmith, whose iron implement prevents him searing his hand and fingers; you too must learn to take thought and spare yourself by the help of your followers."

O-R Liber quintus. 108. II. 2. Proceribus abunde stiparis; tua tibi quies maneat; per alios gerendi sane belli facultatem propemodum exploratam habere poteris. Liceat militi regiam prætentare fortunam; salutem tuam pacifice moderare, alieno negotium periculo moliturus. Satius est servum deperire quam herum. Quod fabro forceps, tuus tibi satelles agat: ille ferramenti remedio manus cauterium cavet atque a digitorum sibi incendio temperat; tu quoque tibi tuorum opera parcere et consulere disce."
PF Book V.  122.
 Erik continues his speech:
"A large body of nobles forms your entourage; keep your quiet life; others fairly certainly will give you a chance to discover your military potential. Let your soldiers make a preliminary test of their king's fortune; control your own safety by being a non-combatant, and if you should set this sceme in motion, leave other men to take the risks.  It's better for a slave to perish than his lord. Your retainer should serve you as tongs do a blacksmith, whose iron implement prevents him searing his hand and fingers; you too must learn to take thought and spare yourself by the help of your followers."

O-R Liber quintus. 108. II. 2. Proceribus abunde stiparis; tua tibi quies maneat; per alios gerendi sane belli facultatem propemodum exploratam habere poteris. Liceat militi regiam prætentare fortunam; salutem tuam pacifice moderare, alieno negotium periculo moliturus. Satius est servum deperire quam herum. Quod fabro forceps, tuus tibi satelles agat: ille ferramenti remedio manus cauterium cavet atque a digitorum sibi incendio temperat; tu quoque tibi tuorum opera parcere et consulere disce."
PF Book V.  122.
 Erik continues his speech:
"A large body of nobles forms your entourage; keep your quiet life; others fairly certainly will give you a chance to discover your military potential. Let your soldiers make a preliminary test of their king's fortune; control your own safety by being a non-combatant, and if you should set this sceme in motion, leave other men to take the risks.  It's better for a slave to perish than his lord. Your retainer should serve you as tongs do a blacksmith, whose iron implement prevents him searing his hand and fingers; you too must learn to take thought and spare yourself by the help of your followers."

O-R Liber quintus. 110. II. 7. Et ne mutationis industrie notaretur, taliter, inquit, æstuante freto puppim in proram referri solitam. Nec tenue viri ingenium fuit, industrii operis dissimulationem a navigii consuetundine mutuantis.
PF Book V.  124.  Erik, when he takes the stronger portion of snake venom broth and gives Roller the weaker:

To prevent his motive for the change being detected he said, "That's how the stern becomes the prow when the sea grows rough." It required some mental agility in the man ot take a simile from sailing to cover up his purposeful action.

O-R Liber quintus. 111. II. 9. Ericus se ad astandum fratri natura pertrahi dixit, probrosum referens alitem, qui proprium polluat nidum.
PF Book V. 125.  Erik, when he has eaten the stronger snake porridge Kraka had intended for her son, Roller, replies when she asks him to take care of her son.
Erik replied that he was naturally drawn to stand by his brother; it was a shameful bird which fouled its own nest.25    HED 75:     25Kallstenius (p. 20) finds Icelandic and Danish parallels to both sayings here: (no. 16) bróður sinn skal eingin vjela (One must not trick one's brother); (no. 18) Thi det maatte vere en slemer Ful som besmitter sin egen Rede: (It's a wretched bird that fouls its own nest).

O-R Liber quintus. 111. II. 9. Ericus se ad astandum fratri natura pertrahi dixit, probrosum referens alitem, qui proprium polluat nidum.
PF Book V. 125.  Erik, when he has eaten the stronger snake porridge Kraka had intended for her son, Roller, replies when she asks him to take care of her son.
Erik replied that he was naturally drawn to stand by his brother; it was a shameful bird which fouled its own nest.25    HED 75:     25Kallstenius (p. 20) finds Icelandic and Danish parallels to both sayings here: (no. 16) bróður sinn skal eingin vjela (One must not trick one's brother); (no. 18) Thi det maatte vere en slemer Ful som besmitter sin egen Rede: (It's a wretched bird that fouls its own nest).

O-R Liber quintus. 111-12. II. 13. Victoria arti contributa est; neque enim offusum undis navigium pugnæ patiens esse poterat. Taliter Oddone cum sociis interempto, captisque qui in statione erant, neminem cladis nuntium evasisse compertum est.
PF Book V. 126. Erik has defeated Oddi by cunning.
Artifice and victory went hand in hand
; swamped vessels had no chance to be pugnacious. That is how Oddi and his comrades were killed and the look-outs captured, nor did anyone, it seems, escape to report the calamity.

O-R Liber quintus. 111-12. II. 13. Victoria arti contributa est; neque enim offusum undis navigium pugnæ patiens esse poterat. Taliter Oddone cum sociis interempto, captisque qui in statione erant, neminem cladis nuntium evasisse compertum est.
PF Book V. 126. Erik has defeated Oddi by cunning.
Artifice and victory went hand in hand; swamped vessels had no chance to be pugnacious. That is how Oddi and his comrades were killed and the look-outs captured, nor did anyone, it seems, escape to report the calamity.

O-R Liber quintus. 112. III. 1. Tum Ericus portum, a quo Frotho non longe deversabatur, accessit, statimque ut e navi vestigium extulit, inopinato casu correptus ruibundo terram corpore petivit. Ille sibi in lapsu faustum ominatus eventum, tenui principio meliores augurabatur exitus affuturos.
PF Book V. 126. Erik falls as he approaches Frothi's court.
Next Erik reached a harbour not far from where Frothi was staying, but the very instant he stepped from the boat he inadvertently tripped and fell to the earth. He interpreted the stumble as boding well and predicted that after this weak start more propitious events would ensue.29  HED 75:    29This may have been suggested by the story of Brutus and his deliberate fall in order to kiss the earth and so fulfil the prophecy of the oracle at Delphi (Book IV, note 43 above). There are, however, other tales of a fall taken as either a good or a bad omen; William of Normandy fell when landing in England, but is said to have insisted that this was a lucky sign; the fall of Harald at Stamford Bridge was afterwards interpreted as an omen of defeat, although the king himself is said to have declared 'A fall is good luck on a journey' (Heimskringla, Haralds S. Sigurð. 90).
Gering 7. fall (nr. 98). – Weitere belege sind: Sverris s. c. 30 (Konunga s. 3732); ebda c. 177 (18033). Vgl. auch Ól. s. helga c. 29 (Heimskr. 2, 3714 fg.): 'fell ek nú', segir konungr. Þá segir Hrani: 'eigi felltu, konungr! nú festir þú fœtr á landi'. Konungr hló við ok mælti: 'vera má svá, ef guð vill'. Saxo (ed. Holder) 13214: ille (Ericus) sibi in lapsu faustum ominatus eventum, tenui principio meliores augurabatur exitus affuturos.
TPMA 3. 149.  FALL/chute/fall 8. Beurteilung des Fallens  8.1. Fallen (for der Reise) ist ein gutes Omen6   Mlat. 210 Ille sibi in lapsu faustum ominatus euentum Er sagte sich selbst im Fall ein glückliches Ereignis voraus SAXO GRAMM. 132, 14 (= Gering S. 7).  Nord. 211-214  Fall er farar heill Fall ist ein gutes Reiseomen SVERRIS SAGA 33 (→ FMS VIII, 85 [= GERING S. 7]). HARALDS SAGA HARÐRÁÐA 118 (→ FMS VI, 414). SNORRI, HEIMSKRINGLA 505, 32 (Haralds saga harðráða) (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 98. JÓNSSON 38). MORKINSKINNA 116, 30.  215 Hefir oss nú farit, sem mælt er, at fall er fararheill Es is uns jetzt so ergangen, wie es im Sprichwort heisst, dass Fall ein gutes Reiseomen ist SVERRIS SAGA 163 (→ FMS VIII, 403 [= GERING S. 7]).

O-R Liber quintus. 112. III. 2. Præcipuus vigor iis regumque domesticus est lar,/qui proprias numquam deseruere domos./Acceptatur enim paucis, quod pessimus edit;/invisi raro facta placere solent.
PF Book V. 127. Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Grep:
Those men have special strength, their guardian deity royal,/who have never strayed away from their own dwellings.31/There are few people warm to a deed wrought by a rascal,/and the acts of detestable fellows rarely please.     HED 75:  31The attendant or guardian spirit, called hamingja, which seems to personify a man's luck, could be extended by a king to his followers in order to bring them protection and good fortune, even though he was not with them; possibly Grep claims this kind of support from the 'luck' of the king, which Erik, as a stranger, is denied.

O-R Liber quintus. 112. III. 2. Præcipuus vigor iis regumque domesticus est lar,/qui proprias numquam deseruere domos./Acceptatur enim paucis, quod pessimus edit;/invisi raro facta placere solent.
PF Book V. 127. Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Grep:
Those men have special strength, their guardian deity royal,/who have never strayed away from their own dwellings.31/There are few people warm to a deed wrought by a rascal,/and the acts of detestable fellows rarely please.     HED 75:  31The attendant or guardian spirit, called hamingja, which seems to personify a man's luck, could be extended by a king to his followers in order to bring them protection and good fortune, even though he was not with them; possibly Grep claims this kind of support from the 'luck' of the king, which Erik, as a stranger, is denied.

O-R Liber quintus. 112. III. 2. Præcipuus vigor iis regumque domesticus est lar,/qui proprias numquam deseruere domos./Acceptatur enim paucis, quod pessimus edit;/invisi raro facta placere solent.
PF Book V. 127. Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Grep:
Those men have special strength, their guardian deity royal,/who have never strayed away from their own dwellings.31/There are few people warm to a deed wrought by a rascal,/and the acts of detestable fellows rarely please.     HED 75:  31The attendant or guardian spirit, called hamingja, which seems to personify a man's luck, could be extended by a king to his followers in order to bring them protection and good fortune, even though he was not with them; possibly Grep claims this kind of support from the 'luck' of the king, which Erik, as a stranger, is denied.

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 2. In rebus mens stulta modum deprendere nescit,/turpis et affectus immoderata sui./Remorum ductus velorum vincitur usu,/æquora ventus agit, tristior aura solum:/Nam freta remigium penetrat, mendacia terras;/istas ore premi constat, at illa manu.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:
A blockhead,
unrestrained and unseemly in his emotions,/cannot conduct his affairs with due moderation.32/Sailing tackle outstrips the pull of rowers; gales/ruffle the seas, but a drearier breeze the earth./Oars cleave the wave, falsehood the land; the latter/is vexed by men's mouths, but hands weigh hard on the other.33   HED 75-6:   32Certain passages in this poem recall statements in Hávamál on the subject of wisdom and folly, and the kind of behaviour distinguishing the wise man from the fool: e.g. 'The foolish man in company will do best to keep silent; no one will know how ignorant he is unless he talks too much' (27).   HED 76:   31Kallstenius' parallels here are not very close (p. 26, nos. 57, 58). However, resemblances can again be seen to the kind of simile used in Hávamál where in verse 53 the limited wisdom of men is likened to shallow seas, and in verse 90 the putting of trust in a deceitful woman to driving a young untrained colt over ice. Saxo's argument is not altogether easy to follow. He seems to imply that the wind over the sea blows freely and unchecked, but on land an evil wind of lies and rumours passes over men. As the sea is oppressed by oars of rowers, a slow and difficult method of forcing a boat over the water compared with sailing, so the duplicity of men makes progress slow and difficult on land. He may also be expressing the feeling that life is more healthy and honest at sea. The Icelandic proverb quoted by Kallstenius (p. 29, no. 74) Biðendur byr eiga en bráðir handaróður is given by Vigfusson under and-róði (pulling against wind and current): Those who wait get a fair wind, those who are hasty pull against wind and tide.

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 2. In rebus mens stulta modum deprendere nescit,/turpis et affectus immoderata sui./Remorum ductus velorum vincitur usu,/æquora ventus agit, tristior aura solum:/Nam freta remigium penetrat, mendacia terras;/istas ore premi constat, at illa manu.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:
A blockhead, unrestrained and unseemly in his emotions,/cannot conduct his affairs with due moderation.32/Sailing tackle outstrips the pull of rowers; gales/ruffle the seas, but a drearier breeze the earth./Oars cleave the wave, falsehood the land; the latter/is vexed by men's mouths, but hands weigh hard on the other.33   HED 75-6:   32Certain passages in this poem recall statements in Hávamál on the subject of wisdom and folly, and the kind of behaviour distinguishing the wise man from the fool: e.g. 'The foolish man in company will do best to keep silent; no one will know how ignorant he is unless he talks too much' (27).    HED 76:   33Kallstenius' parallels here are not very close (p. 26, nos. 57, 58). However, resemblances can again be seen to the kind of simile used in Hávamál where in verse 53 the limited wisdom of men is likened to shallow seas, and in verse 90 the putting of trust in a deceitful woman to driving a young untrained colt over ice. Saxo's argument is not altogether easy to follow. He seems to imply that the wind over the sea blows freely and unchecked, but on land an evil wind of lies and rumours passes over men. As the sea is oppressed by oars of rowers, a slow and difficult method of forcing a boat over the water compared with sailing, so the duplicity of men makes progress slow and difficult on land. He may also be expressing the feeling that life is more healthy and honest at sea. The Icelandic proverb quoted by Kallstenius (p. 29, no. 74) Biðendur byr eiga en bráðir handaróður is given by Vigfusson under and-róði (pulling against wind and current): Those who wait get a fair wind, those who are hasty pull against wind and tide.

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 2. In rebus mens stulta modum deprendere nescit,/turpis et affectus immoderata sui./Remorum ductus velorum vincitur usu,/æquora ventus agit, tristior aura solum:/Nam freta remigium penetrat, mendacia terras;/istas ore premi constat, at illa manu.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:
A blockhead, unrestrained and unseemly in his emotions,/cannot conduct his affairs with due moderation.32/Sailing tackle outstrips the pull of rowers; gales/ruffle the seas, but a drearier breeze the earth./Oars cleave the wave, falsehood the land; the latter/is vexed by men's mouths, but hands weigh hard on the other.33   HED 75-6:   32Certain passages in this poem recall statements in Hávamál on the subject of wisdom and folly, and the kind of behaviour distinguishing the wise man from the fool: e.g. 'The foolish man in company will do best to keep silent; no one will know how ignorant he is unless he talks too much' (27).    HED 76:  33Kallstenius' parallels here are not very close (p. 26, nos. 57, 58). However, resemblances can again be seen to the kind of simile used in Hávamál where in verse 53 the limited wisdom of men is likened to shallow seas, and in verse 90 the putting of trust in a deceitful woman to driving a young untrained colt over ice. Saxo's argument is not altogether easy to follow. He seems to imply that the wind over the sea blows freely and unchecked, but on land an evil wind of lies and rumours passes over men. As the sea is oppressed by oars of rowers, a slow and difficult method of forcing a boat over the water compared with sailing, so the duplicity of men makes progress slow and difficult on land. He may also be expressing the feeling that life is more healthy and honest at sea. The Icelandic proverb quoted by Kallstenius (p. 29, no. 74) Biðendur byr eiga en bráðir handaróður is given by Vigfusson under and-róði (pulling against wind and current): Those who wait get a fair wind, those who are hasty pull against wind and tide.

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 2. In rebus mens stulta modum deprendere nescit,/turpis et affectus immoderata sui./Remorum ductus velorum vincitur usu,/æquora ventus agit, tristior aura solum:/Nam freta remigium penetrat, mendacia terras;/istas ore premi constat, at illa manu.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:
A blockhead, unrestrained and unseemly in his emotions,/cannot conduct his affairs with due moderation.32/Sailing tackle outstrips the pull of rowers; gales/ruffle the seas, but a drearier breeze the earth./Oars cleave the wave, falsehood the land; the latter/is vexed by men's mouths, but hands weigh hard on the other.33   HED 75-6:   32Certain passages in this poem recall statements in Hávamál on the subject of wisdom and folly, and the kind of behaviour distinguishing the wise man from the fool: e.g. 'The foolish man in company will do best to keep silent; no one will know how ignorant he is unless he talks too much' (27).    HED 76:   33Kallstenius' parallels here are not very close (p. 26, nos. 57, 58). However, resemblances can again be seen to the kind of simile used in Hávamál where in verse 53 the limited wisdom of men is likened to shallow seas, and in verse 90 the putting of trust in a deceitful woman to driving a young untrained colt over ice. Saxo's argument is not altogether easy to follow. He seems to imply that the wind over the sea blows freely and unchecked, but on land an evil wind of lies and rumours passes over men. As the sea is oppressed by oars of rowers, a slow and difficult method of forcing a boat over the water compared with sailing, so the duplicity of men makes progress slow and difficult on land. He may also be expressing the feeling that life is more healthy and honest at sea. The Icelandic proverb quoted by Kallstenius (p. 29, no. 74) Biðendur byr eiga en bráðir handaróður is given by Vigfusson under and-róði (pulling against wind and current): Those who wait get a fair wind, those who are hasty pull against wind and tide.

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 2. In rebus mens stulta modum deprendere nescit,/turpis et affectus immoderata sui./Remorum ductus velorum vincitur usu,/æquora ventus agit, tristior aura solum:/Nam freta remigium penetrat, mendacia terras;/istas ore premi constat, at illa manu.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:
A blockhead, unrestrained and unseemly in his emotions,/cannot conduct his affairs with due moderation.32/Sailing tackle outstrips the pull of rowers; gales/ruffle the seas, but a drearier breeze the earth./Oars cleave the wave, falsehood the land; the latter/is vexed by men's mouths, but hands weigh hard on the other.33   HED 75-6:   32Certain passages in this poem recall statements in Hávamál on the subject of wisdom and folly, and the kind of behaviour distinguishing the wise man from the fool: e.g. 'The foolish man in company will do best to keep silent; no one will know how ignorant he is unless he talks too much' (27).   HED 76:   33Kallstenius' parallels here are not very close (p. 26, nos. 57, 58). However, resemblances can again be seen to the kind of simile used in Hávamál where in verse 53 the limited wisdom of men is likened to shallow seas, and in verse 90 the putting of trust in a deceitful woman to driving a young untrained colt over ice. Saxo's argument is not altogether easy to follow. He seems to imply that the wind over the sea blows freely and unchecked, but on land an evil wind of lies and rumours passes over men. As the sea is oppressed by oars of rowers, a slow and difficult method of forcing a boat over the water compared with sailing, so the duplicity of men makes progress slow and difficult on land. He may also be expressing the feeling that life is more healthy and honest at sea. The Icelandic proverb quoted by Kallstenius (p. 29, no. 74) Biðendur byr eiga en bráðir handaróður is given by Vigfusson under and-róði (pulling against wind and current): Those who wait get a fair wind, those who are hasty pull against wind and tide.

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 3. Ut gallus cæni, sic litis plenus haberis,/sorde gravis putes nec nisi crimen oles./Adversum scurram causam producere non est,/qui vacua vocis mobilitate viget.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Grep:
You are crammed full of disputes, they say, as a cock with filth,34/stinking of low breeding and accusations./It is hard to bring a case against a buffoon, who thrives/on a dance of words without expressing a meaning. HED 76:   34The cock is full of filth because he picks up grains from the midden, where he is said to rule (Book VII, note 84), cf. Kallstenius, p. 31, no. 89.

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 3. Ut gallus cæni, sic litis plenus haberis,/sorde gravis putes nec nisi crimen oles./Adversum scurram causam producere non est,/qui vacua vocis mobilitate viget.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Grep:
You are crammed full of disputes, they say, as a cock with filth,34/stinking of low breeding and accusations./It is hard to bring a case against a buffoon, who thrives/on a dance of words without expressing a meaning.  HED 76:   34The cock is full of filth because he picks up grains from the midden, where he is said to rule (Book VII, note 84), cf. Kallstenius, p. 31, no. 89.

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 3. Hercule, ni fallor, ad eum, qui protulit ipsum,/editus ignave sermo redire solet./Ad prolatorem iusto conamine divi/fusa parum docte verba referre solent./Quando lupi dubias primum discernimus aures,/ipsum in vicino credimus esse lupum./Nulla fides fidei vacuo præstanda putatur,/quem rumor sontem proditionis agit.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:
By heaven, brainless talk, unless I am much mistaken,/often rebounds on the head of him who uttered it./Through the righteous dispensation of the gods, words poured forth/with too little wit return to plague the deliverer./As soon as we first detect a pair of suspicious wolf's ears,35/we believe the creature itself is lurking near./No one thinks we should trust a person empty of faith,/one whom report pronounces guilty of treason.     HED 76:  35The same proverb is found in Fáfnismál 35: Mér ulfs vón es eyru sék (I know the wolf is not far off when I spy his ears).

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 3. Hercule, ni fallor, ad eum, qui protulit ipsum,/editus ignave sermo redire solet./Ad prolatorem iusto conamine divi/fusa parum docte verba referre solent./Quando lupi dubias primum discernimus aures,/ipsum in vicino credimus esse lupum./Nulla fides fidei vacuo præstanda putatur,/quem rumor sontem proditionis agit.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:
By heaven, brainless talk, unless I am much mistaken,/often rebounds on the head of him who uttered it./Through the righteous dispensation of the gods, words poured forth/with too little wit return to plague the deliverer./As soon as we first detect a pair of suspicious wolf's ears,35/we believe the creature itself is lurking near./No one thinks we should trust a person empty of faith,/one whom report pronounces guilty of treason.     HED 76:  35The same proverb is found in Fáfnismál 35: Mér ulfs vón es eyru sék (I know the wolf is not far off when I spy his ears).

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 3. Hercule, ni fallor, ad eum, qui protulit ipsum,/editus ignave sermo redire solet./Ad prolatorem iusto conamine divi/fusa parum docte verba referre solent./Quando lupi dubias primum discernimus aures,/ipsum in vicino credimus esse lupum./Nulla fides fidei vacuo præstanda putatur,/quem rumor sontem proditionis agit.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:
By heaven, brainless talk, unless I am much mistaken,/often rebounds on the head of him who uttered it./Through the righteous dispensation of the gods, words poured forth/with too little wit return to plague the deliverer./As soon as we first detect a pair of suspicious wolf's ears,35/we believe the creature itself is lurking near./No one thinks we should trust a person empty of faith,/one whom report pronounces guilty of treason.   HED 76:  35The same proverb is found in Fáfnismál 35: Mér ulfs vón es eyru sék (I know the wolf is not far off when I spy his ears).

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 3. Hercule, ni fallor, ad eum, qui protulit ipsum,/editus ignave sermo redire solet./Ad prolatorem iusto conamine divi/fusa parum docte verba referre solent./Quando lupi dubias primum discernimus aures,/ipsum in vicino credimus esse lupum./Nulla fides fidei vacuo præstanda putatur,/quem rumor sontem proditionis agit.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:
By heaven, brainless talk, unless I am much mistaken,/often rebounds on the head of him who uttered it./Through the righteous dispensation of the gods, words poured forth/with too little wit return to plague the deliverer./As soon as we first detect a pair of suspicious wolf's ears,35/we believe the creature itself is lurking near./No one thinks we should trust a person empty of faith,/one whom report pronounces guilty of treason.    HED 76:  35The same proverb is found in Fáfnismál 35: Mér ulfs vón es eyru sék (I know the wolf is not far off when I spy his ears).

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 4. Augurium timidi pravique assueta voluntas/numquam se digno continuere loco./Qui dominum fallit, qui fœdas concipit artes,/tam sibi quam sociis insidiosus erit./Æde lupum quicumque fovet, nutrire putatur/prædonem proprio perniciemque lari.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:

The predictions of the coward and the hardened cravings of the vicious/were never contained within their proper bounds./He who cheats his lord and hatches lewd designs/will be a snare to his comrades and himself./Whoever nurses a wolf in his home is generally thought/to be fostering a thief, a murderer of his own household.36    HED 76:   36Another proverb quoted in the Poetic Edda, in Sigurðarkviða 12: Skalat ulf ala ungan lengi (Never foster a wolf cub too long).

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 4. Augurium timidi pravique assueta voluntas/numquam se digno continuere loco./Qui dominum fallit, qui fœdas concipit artes,/tam sibi quam sociis insidiosus erit./Æde lupum quicumque fovet, nutrire putatur/prædonem proprio perniciemque lari.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:

The predictions of the coward and the hardened cravings of the vicious/were never contained within their proper bounds./He who cheats his lord and hatches lewd designs/will be a snare to his comrades and himself./Whoever nurses a wolf in his home is generally thought/to be fostering a thief, a murderer of his own household.36    HED 76:   36Another proverb quoted in the Poetic Edda, in Sigurðarkviða 12: Skalat ulf ala ungan lengi (Never foster a wolf cub too long).

O-R Liber quintus. 113. III. 4. Augurium timidi pravique assueta voluntas/numquam se digno continuere loco./Qui dominum fallit, qui fœdas concipit artes,/tam sibi quam sociis insidiosus erit./Æde lupum quicumque fovet, nutrire putatur/prædonem proprio perniciemque lari.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:

The predictions of the coward and the hardened cravings of the vicious/were never contained within their proper bounds./He who cheats his lord and hatches lewd designs/will be a snare to his comrades and himself./Whoever nurses a wolf in his home is generally thought/to be fostering a thief, a murderer of his own household.36    HED 76:   36Another proverb quoted in the Poetic Edda, in Sigurðarkviða 12: Skalat ulf ala ungan lengi (Never foster a wolf cub too long).

O-R Liber quintus. 113-14. III. 5. En te cura premit culpæ rea, tutior huic est/libertas, cui mens intemerata manet./Decipitur quisquis servum sibi poscit amicum;/sæpe solet domino verna nocere suo.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:

See! your pressing anxiety indicts you. Independence/is safer where the mind remains untainted./He is deceived who wants a servant for his friend;/a menial often damages his master.38  HED 76:   38Kallstenius (p. 22, no. 28) quotes an Icelandic proverb: Ilt er að eiga þræl firi einkavin (It´s a bad thing to have a thrall for a close friend).

O-R Liber quintus. 113-14. III. 5. En te cura premit culpæ rea, tutior huic est/libertas, cui mens intemerata manet./Decipitur quisquis servum sibi poscit amicum;/sæpe solet domino verna nocere suo.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:

See! your pressing anxiety indicts you. Independence/is safer where the mind remains untainted./He is deceived who wants a servant for his friend;/a menial often damages his master.38  HED 76:   3Kallstenius (p. 22, no. 28) quotes an Icelandic proverb: Ilt er að eiga þræl firi einkavin (It´s a bad thing to have a thrall for a close friend).
TPMA 2.   255.  DIENEN/servir/to serve  9. Diener 9.10. Umgang mit dem Diener 9.10.4. Man soll vom Diener Abstand halten Mlat. 599 Decipitur, quisquis seruum sibi poscit amicum; Sepe solet domino uerna nocere suo Wer aus seinem Diener seinen Freund machen will, wird betrogen; der Diener pflegt oft seinem Herrn zu schaden SAXO GRAMM. 134, 6.   Nord. 600 Ilt er at eiga þræt at einkavin Schlimm ist es, einen Diener zum vertrauten Freund zu haben KONUNGS SKUGGSJÁ 42 S. 97 (→GERING S. 14). 601 Satt er et fornkveðna . . . : ill er at eiga þræl at einkavin Wahr ist das Sprichwort: . . . GRETTIS SAGA 82, 8 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 482). 602,603 Illt er at eiga þræl at engavin NJÁLS SAGA 49, 37 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 482. JÓNSSON 191). ÞÓRÐAR SAGA HREÐU 44 (→JÓNSSON, ARKIV 482). 604 Er íllt at eiga þræl at einka vin HJÁLMÞÉRS SAGA OK ÖLVERS 12 (→FAS III, 486 [= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 482]). Vgl. HERR 4.1.3., KNAPPE 15, VERTRAUT 1.1.

O-R Liber quintus. 113-14. III. 5. En te cura premit culpæ rea, tutior huic est/libertas, cui mens intemerata manet./Decipitur quisquis servum sibi poscit amicum;/sæpe solet domino verna nocere suo.
PF Book V. 127.  Erik engages in a contest of words with Grep, who bullies with insolence, while the hero relies particularly upon proverbial wisdom for his own rhetorical weapons. Erik:

See! your pressing anxiety indicts you. Independence/is safer where the mind remains untainted./He is deceived who wants a servant for his friend;/a menial often damages his master.38  HED 76:   3Kallstenius (p. 22, no. 28) quotes an Icelandic proverb: Ilt er að eiga þræl firi einkavin (It´s a bad thing to have a thrall for a close friend).

O-R Liber quintus. 114. III. 6. Contra rex docet deliberationem furori dandam: improvida plerumque nocere consilia, nihil caute simul ac celeriter geri posse, plurimum præcipites obesse nisus; ad ultimum multitudine paucos incessere non decere. Ceterum sollertum esse, qui furenti animo frenos iniciat sævientemque ad tempus impetum interpellet. Taliter rex præcipitem iuvenis iram consilio cedere coegit.
PF Book V. 128.  When Grep returns to court in defeat, Frothi counsels him to restrain his wrath:
The king on the other hand suggested he should reflect a while in his wrath; hasty schemes very often misfired, nothing could be carried out both quickly and warily, and frantic ventures mostly turned against their devisers; lastly it was improper for a few men to be attacked by a great swarm.39 The clever individual was one who could throw a curb on his rage and interrupt his violent impetuosity in time. In this way the king forced the young man to be thoughtful in his impuslive anger. HED 77:     39There are a number of proverbs of the 'More haste, less speed' type (see Kallstenius, p. 29, no. 75; cf. note 33 above). The final maxim, that it is improper for a few to be attacked by many, is used again by Erik later in the book (note 94 below) to good effect.

O-R Liber quintus. 114. III. 6. Contra rex docet deliberationem furori dandam: improvida plerumque nocere consilia, nihil caute simul ac celeriter geri posse, plurimum præcipites obesse nisus; ad ultimum multitudine paucos incessere non decere. Ceterum sollertum esse, qui furenti animo frenos iniciat sævientemque ad tempus impetum interpellet. Taliter rex præcipitem iuvenis iram consilio cedere coegit.
PF Book V. 128.  When Grep returns to court in defeat, Frothi counsels him to restrain his wrath:
The king on the other hand suggested he should reflect a while in his wrath; hasty schemes very often misfired, nothing could be carried out both quickly and warily, and frantic ventures mostly turned against their devisers; lastly it was improper for a few men to be attacked by a great swarm.39 The clever individual was one who could throw a curb on his rage and interrupt his violent impetuosity in time. In this way the king forced the young man to be thoughtful in his impuslive anger. HED 77:     39There are a number of proverbs of the 'More haste, less speed' type (see Kallstenius, p. 29, no. 75; cf. note 33 above). The final maxim, that it is improper for a few to be attacked by many, is used again by Erik later in the book (note 94 below) to good effect.

O-R Liber quintus. 114. III. 6. Contra rex docet deliberationem furori dandam: improvida plerumque nocere consilia, nihil caute simul ac celeriter geri posse, plurimum præcipites obesse nisus; ad ultimum multitudine paucos incessere non decere. Ceterum sollertum esse, qui furenti animo frenos iniciat sævientemque ad tempus impetum interpellet. Taliter rex præcipitem iuvenis iram consilio cedere coegit.
PF Book V. 128.  When Grep returns to court in defeat, Frothi counsels him to restrain his wrath:
The king on the other hand suggested he should reflect a while in his wrath; hasty schemes very often misfired, nothing could be carried out both quickly and warily, and frantic ventures mostly turned against their devisers; lastly it was improper for a few men to be attacked by a great swarm.39 The clever individual was one who could throw a curb on his rage and interrupt his violent impetuosity in time. In this way the king forced the young man to be thoughtful in his impuslive anger. HED 77:     39There are a number of proverbs of the 'More haste, less speed' type (see Kallstenius, p. 29, no. 75; cf. note 33 above). The final maxim, that it is improper for a few to be attacked by many, is used again by Erik later in the book (note 94 below) to good effect.

O-R Liber quintus. 114. III. 6. Contra rex docet deliberationem furori dandam: improvida plerumque nocere consilia, nihil caute simul ac celeriter geri posse, plurimum præcipites obesse nisus; ad ultimum multitudine paucos incessere non decere. Ceterum sollertum esse, qui furenti animo frenos iniciat sævientemque ad tempus impetum interpellet. Taliter rex præcipitem iuvenis iram consilio cedere coegit.
PF Book V. 128.  When Grep returns to court in defeat, Frothi counsels him to restrain his wrath:
The king on the other hand suggested he should reflect a while in his wrath; hasty schemes very often misfired, nothing could be carried out both quickly and warily, and frantic ventures mostly turned against their devisers; lastly it was improper for a few men to be attacked by a great swarm.39 The clever individual was one who could throw a curb on his rage and interrupt his violent impetuosity in time. In this way the king forced the young man to be thoughtful in his impuslive anger.   HED 77:     39There are a number of proverbs of the 'More haste, less speed' type (see Kallstenius, p. 29, no. 75; cf. note 33 above). The final maxim, that it is improper for a few to be attacked by many, is used again by Erik later in the book (note 94 below) to good effect.

O-R Liber quintus. 114. III. 6. Contra rex docet deliberationem furori dandam: improvida plerumque nocere consilia, nihil caute simul ac celeriter geri posse, plurimum præcipites obesse nisus; ad ultimum multitudine paucos incessere non decere. Ceterum sollertum esse, qui furenti animo frenos iniciat sævientemque ad tempus impetum interpellet. Taliter rex præcipitem iuvenis iram consilio cedere coegit.
PF Book V. 128.  When Grep returns to court in defeat, Frothi counsels him to restrain his wrath:
The king on the other hand suggested he should reflect a while in his wrath; hasty schemes very often misfired, nothing could be carried out both quickly and warily, and frantic ventures mostly turned against their devisers; lastly it was improper for a few men to be attacked by a great swarm.39 The clever individual was one who could throw a curb on his rage and interrupt his violent impetuosity in time. In this way the king forced the young man to be thoughtful in his impuslive anger.   HED 77:     39There are a number of proverbs of the 'More haste, less speed' type (see Kallstenius, p. 29, no. 75; cf. note 33 above). The final maxim, that it is improper for a few to be attacked by many, is used again by Erik later in the book (note 94 below) to good effect.

O-R Liber quintus. 114. III. 7. "In latorem," inquit, "gestaminis sui fortuna recidat; nos melior consequatur eventus! Male maleficis cedat, infaustæ molis gerulum onus obruat; nobis potiora tribuant omina sospitatem!" Ne secus quam optabatur evenit. Continuo namque excussa cervice ruens ferentem stipes oppressit.
PF Book V. 128.  Erik speaks in response to Grep's niðstöng:

"May this burden's bad luck recoil on its bearer and ours be the better fortune! Let evil come to evil-doers. Let this accursed load break its carrier. Let stronger auspices bring us safety." The sequel came exactly as he wished, for the neck was immediately shaken free, and the stake fell and crushed the man who held it.

O-R Liber quintus. 114. III. 8. Deinde procedentem paulisper Ericum subit destinanda regi esse ab advenis dona. Igitur repertum forte glaciale frustum veste diligenter obvolvens muneris loco regi deferendum curavit. At ubi ad regiam perventum est, prior introitum petens fratrem pone consequi iubet. Et iam vernæ regis, ut ludibrio venientem exciperent, lubricam limini substravere pellem; quam, ingrediente Erico, celeri funis tractu corripientes lapsum insistenti fecissent, ni Rollerus pone subiens pectore nutabundum exciperet fratrem. Ericus itaque semifusus nudum habere tergum fraternitatis inopem referebat. Cumque Gunwara talia regi permittenda negaret, ille stoliditatis legatum damnabat, apud quem insidiarum cautela non esset. Itaque ludibrii excusationem ludificati incuriam fecit.
PF Book V. 128.  Erik approaches Frothi's court:

After Erik had proceeded a little further, it occurred to him that strangers ought to offer gifts to the king. Chancing to discover a piece of ice, he wrapped it carefully in his cloak to preserve and offer it to the ruler as a present. When he reached the palace, before seeking admittance he asked his brother to follow close behind him. Now the royal servants, to have some fun at the expense of their new arrival, had laid down a slippery hide at the threshold; when Erik entered and stepped on it their quick jerk on the rope would have overturned him, had not Roller, coming up behind, caught him against his chest as he reeled.41 Erik, leaning at an angle, remarked that a brotherless man has a bare back.42 Although Gunvara stated that a king should not be allowed to play such tricks, Frothi criticised the envoy for his foolishness in not watching for a trap. He made out that his prank was excusable because Erik, its butt, had been careless.      41Another example of skinndráttr (see note 11 above).  42This is a popular saying quoted more than once in the sagas: Berr er hverr at baki, nema sér bróður eigi (Bare is the back of the man without a brother). This is found in Njáls Saga 152 and Grettis Saga 82. cf. Kallstenius p. 20, no. 17, where he gives a Danish equivalent.

O-R Liber quintus. 114. III. 8. Deinde procedentem paulisper Ericum subit destinanda regi esse ab advenis dona. Igitur repertum forte glaciale frustum veste diligenter obvolvens muneris loco regi deferendum curavit. At ubi ad regiam perventum est, prior introitum petens fratrem pone consequi iubet. Et iam vernæ regis, ut ludibrio venientem exciperent, lubricam limini substravere pellem; quam, ingrediente Erico, celeri funis tractu corripientes lapsum insistenti fecissent, ni Rollerus pone subiens pectore nutabundum exciperet fratrem. Ericus itaque semifusus nudum habere tergum fraternitatis inopem referebat. Cumque Gunwara talia regi permittenda negaret, ille stoliditatis legatum damnabat, apud quem insidiarum cautela non esset. Itaque ludibrii excusationem ludificati incuriam fecit.
PF Book V. 128.  Erik approaches Frothi's court:

After Erik had proceeded a little further, it occurred to him that strangers ought to offer gifts to the king. Chancing to discover a piece of ice, he wrapped it carefully in his cloak to preserve and offer it to the ruler as a present. When he reached the palace, before seeking admittance he asked his brother to follow close behind him. Now the royal servants, to have some fun at the expense of their new arrival, had laid down a slippery hide at the threshold; when Erik entered and stepped on it their quick jerk on the rope would have overturned him, had not Roller, coming up behind, caught him against his chest as he reeled. 41 Erik, leaning at an angle, remarked that a brotherless man has a bare back. 42 Although Gunvara stated that a king should not be allowed to play such tricks, Frothi criticised the envoy for his foolishness in not watching for a trap. He made out that his prank was excusable because Erik, its butt, had been careless.    HED 77:   41Another example of skinndráttr (see note 11 above).  42This is a popular saying quoted more than once in the sagas: Berr er hverr at baki, nema sér bróður eigi (Bare is the back of the man without a brother). This is found in Njáls Saga 152 and Grettis Saga 82. cf. Kallstenius p. 20, no. 17, where he gives a Danish equivalent.
FJ Proverb word 25. Page 66. bak – berr er hverr á bakinu nema sér bróður eigi Grett 185 (Boer 283). ‘Enhver er bar på ryggen (værgeløs bagfra) medmindre han har sig en broder’. Også i GJ med udeladelse af sér.
Gering 6. bak (nr. 25b). – Das sprichwort: berr er hverr á bakinu nema sér broður eigi (Grett. c. 82, 13) steht auch Njála c. 152, 5. Vgl. Saxo (ed. Holder) 13519: nudum habere tergum fraternitatis inopem; Peder Låle nr. 395: fraternitatis orbatus est pro nudo reputatus (bar ær brodherløss man).
Saxo (Kallstenius) 20. Frändskap. 17. nudum habere tergum fraternitatis inopem, referebat, s. 13519. – Bar er broderløs Bag, Vedel s. 8911. Se vidare D n:r 395 med komm., Rosenberg a. a. II s. 601 not, Gering Ark 32 s. 6 och JR II n:r 169 (s. 19).
TPMA 2.   128. BRUDER/frère/brother 1. Ein Bruder ist wertvoll und von grossem Nutzen 1.3. Wer keinen Bruder hat, ist nackt (ungeschützt) Mlat. 9 Nudum habere tergum fraternitatis inopem, referebat (scil. Ericus) Er (Ericus) rief, dass der Bruderlose einen ungeschützten Rücken habe SAXO GRAMM. 135, 19. Nord. 10.11 Berr er hverr á bakinu (NJÁLS SAGA: at baki), nema sér bróður eigi Jeder ist am Rücken nackt, ausser demjenigen, der einen Bruder hat GRETTIS SAGA 82, 13 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 25. GERING S. 6. JÓNSSON 22). NJÁLS SAGA 152, 5. 12 Fratribus orbatus est pro nudo reputatus. – Bar ær brodherløss man Jemand, der seiner Brüder beraubt ist, wird als nackt angesehen. – Ein bruderloser Mann ist nackt LÅLE 395. Variiert: 13 Opt kømr mér Mána brúþar (H.s.: bjarnar2) Í byrvind Brœþraleyse; Hyggjomk umb, Es hildr þróask Oft kommt mir der Mangel an Brüdern in den Sinn (wörtl.: in den Fahrtwind der Mondbraut [des Mondbären]); ich denke darüber nach, wenn der Kampflärm anschwillt EGILL, SONATORREK 13, 1 (→EGILS SAGA S. 305).

O-R Liber quintus. 114. III. 8. Deinde procedentem paulisper Ericum subit destinanda regi esse ab advenis dona. Igitur repertum forte glaciale frustum veste diligenter obvolvens muneris loco regi deferendum curavit. At ubi ad regiam perventum est, prior introitum petens fratrem pone consequi iubet. Et iam vernæ regis, ut ludibrio venientem exciperent, lubricam limini substravere pellem; quam, ingrediente Erico, celeri funis tractu corripientes lapsum insistenti fecissent, ni Rollerus pone subiens pectore nutabundum exciperet fratrem. Ericus itaque semifusus nudum habere tergum fraternitatis inopem referebat. Cumque Gunwara talia regi permittenda negaret, ille stoliditatis legatum damnabat, apud quem insidiarum cautela non esset. Itaque ludibrii excusationem ludificati incuriam fecit.
PF Book V. 128.  Erik approaches Frothi's court:

After Erik had proceeded a little further, it occurred to him that strangers ought to offer gifts to the king. Chancing to discover a piece of ice, he wrapped it carefully in his cloak to preserve and offer it to the ruler as a present. When he reached the palace, before seeking admittance he asked his brother to follow close behind him. Now the royal servants, to have some fun at the expense of their new arrival, had laid down a slippery hide at the threshold; when Erik entered and stepped on it their quick jerk on the rope would have overturned him, had not Roller, coming up behind, caught him against his chest as he reeled.41 Erik, leaning at an angle, remarked that a brotherless man has a bare back.42 Although Gunvara stated that a king should not be allowed to play such tricks, Frothi criticised the envoy for his foolishness in not watching for a trap. He made out that his prank was excusable because Erik, its butt, had been careless.    HED 77:   41Another example of skinndráttr (see note 11 above). 42This is a popular saying quoted more than once in the sagas: Berr er hverr at baki, nema sér bróður eigi (Bare is the back of the man without a brother). This is found in Njáls Saga 152 and Grettis Saga 82. cf. Kallstenius p. 20, no. 17, where he gives a Danish equivalent.
[Hávamál advice.]

O-R Liber quintus. 115. III. 9. Qui, applicante se ipsis Erico, ululantium more luporum horrisonas dedere voces. Rex strepitum inhibere cœpit, docens non debere pectoribus humanis ferinos inesse sonos. Subiunxit Ericus canum hunc esse morem, ut uno inchoante ceteri latratum edant, quod propriam cuncti moribus originem prodant ac suum quisque genus fateatur.
PF Book V. 129.  Erik when Frothi's champions begin howling:
Whe Erik joined the latter, they emitted blood-curdling cries like howling wolves. The king began to restrain their ululation, telling them that human throats ought not to make animal noises, but Erik put in that it was dog-like enough for the rest to bark when one had set them going; everyone's habits revealed his true origin and species.

O-R Liber quintus. 115. III. 9. Qui, applicante se ipsis Erico, ululantium more luporum horrisonas dedere voces. Rex strepitum inhibere cœpit, docens non debere pectoribus humanis ferinos inesse sonos. Subiunxit Ericus canum hunc esse morem, ut uno inchoante ceteri latratum edant, quod propriam cuncti moribus originem prodant ac suum quisque genus fateatur.
PF Book V. 129.  Erik when Frothi's champions begin howling:
Whe Erik joined the latter, they emitted blood-curdling cries like howling wolves. The king began to restrain their ululation, telling them that human throats ought not to make animal noises, but Erik put in that it was dog-like enough for the rest to bark when one had set them going; everyone's habits revealed his true origin and species.

O-R Liber quintus. 115. III. 9. Qui, applicante se ipsis Erico, ululantium more luporum horrisonas dedere voces. Rex strepitum inhibere cœpit, docens non debere pectoribus humanis ferinos inesse sonos. Subiunxit Ericus canum hunc esse morem, ut uno inchoante ceteri latratum edant, quod propriam cuncti moribus originem prodant ac suum quisque genus fateatur.
PF Book V. 129.  Erik when Frothi's champions begin howling:
Whe Erik joined the latter, they emitted blood-curdling cries like howling wolves. The king began to restrain their ululation, telling them that human throats ought not to make animal noises, but Erik put in that it was dog-like enough for the rest to bark when one had set them going; everyone's habits revealed his true origin and species.      

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 11.   . . . dissiliens Greppus, ut Ericum telo traiceret, procurrit, criminantis cæce suam redimere cupiens. Quem Rollerus destricto ense occupans molitionis suæ prædamnavit exemplo. Aitque Ericus: "Optima est affinium opera opis indigo." Et Rollerus: "Inter asperos casus officiose asciscendi sunt boni." Tum Frotho: "Credo eventurum vobis, quod vulgo dici assolet, ferienti interdum breve percussionis gaudium fore nec diu manum ictu exhilarari solere." Et Ericus: "Non est arguendus, cuius operi excusamentum iustitia tribuit. Tantum enim inter nostram atque Greppi operam distat, quantum inter defendentis se atque alium impetentis interest actionem."
PF Book V. 130.   The altercation when Erik reveals Grep has slept with Hanunda, Frothi's wife:

. . . Grep sprang from his seat and ran at Erik to transfix him with his weapon, aiming to rescue his own life by killing his accuser. But Roller forestalled his attempt with drawn sword and paid him in his own coin. "Kinsmen's service is very valuable when you need help", remarked Erik. "In desperate straits you must have good men to oblige you", 47 replied Roller. "I believe", Frothi said, "that the common saying will apply to you two. The assassin's pleasure will often be short-lived and the joy of his hand brief once it has struck.48 You can't criticise a fully-justified action", Erik answered. "The difference between Grep's work and ours is that between self-defence and a malicious attack."    HED 77:   47 Kallstenius (p. 23, no. 35) quotes similar but not parallel proverbs: e.g. Í þörf reynist vinr bezt (In time of need you discover your best friend).   48A similar proverb is quoted in Njáls Saga 42: Skamma stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin (The hand will not have long to rejoice over the blow). Kallstenius (p. 24, no. 38) has similar but not identical instances from Denmark.

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 11.   . . . dissiliens Greppus, ut Ericum telo traiceret, procurrit, criminantis cæce suam redimere cupiens. Quem Rollerus destricto ense occupans molitionis suæ prædamnavit exemplo. Aitque Ericus: "Optima est affinium opera opis indigo." Et Rollerus: "Inter asperos casus officiose asciscendi sunt boni." Tum Frotho: "Credo eventurum vobis, quod vulgo dici assolet, ferienti interdum breve percussionis gaudium fore nec diu manum ictu exhilarari solere." Et Ericus: "Non est arguendus, cuius operi excusamentum iustitia tribuit. Tantum enim inter nostram atque Greppi operam distat, quantum inter defendentis se atque alium impetentis interest actionem."
PF Book V. 130.   The altercation when Erik reveals Grep has slept with Hanunda, Frothi's wife:

. . . Grep sprang from his seat and ran at Erik to transfix him with his weapon, aiming to rescue his own life by killing his accuser. But Roller forestalled his attempt with drawn sword and paid him in his own coin. "Kinsmen's service is very valuable when you need help", remarked Erik. "In desperate straits you must have good men to oblige you",47 replied Roller. "I believe", Frothi said, "that the common saying will apply to you two. The assassin's pleasure will often be short-lived and the joy of his hand brief once it has struck.48 You can't criticise a fully-justified action", Erik answered. "The difference between Grep's work and ours is that between self-defence and a malicious attack."    HED 77:   47Kallstenius (p. 23, no. 35) quotes similar but not parallel proverbs: e.g. Í þörf reynist vinr bezt (In time of need you discover your best friend).   48A similar proverb is quoted in Njáls Saga 42: Skamma stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin (The hand will not have long to rejoice over the blow). Kallstenius (p. 24, no. 38) has similar but not identical instances from Denmark.

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 11.   . . . dissiliens Greppus, ut Ericum telo traiceret, procurrit, criminantis cæce suam redimere cupiens. Quem Rollerus destricto ense occupans molitionis suæ prædamnavit exemplo. Aitque Ericus: "Optima est affinium opera opis indigo." Et Rollerus: "Inter asperos casus officiose asciscendi sunt boni." Tum Frotho: "Credo eventurum vobis, quod vulgo dici assolet, ferienti interdum breve percussionis gaudium fore nec diu manum ictu exhilarari solere." Et Ericus: "Non est arguendus, cuius operi excusamentum iustitia tribuit. Tantum enim inter nostram atque Greppi operam distat, quantum inter defendentis se atque alium impetentis interest actionem."
PF Book V. 130.   The altercation when Erik reveals Grep has slept with Hanunda, Frothi's wife:

. . . Grep sprang from his seat and ran at Erik to transfix him with his weapon, aiming to rescue his own life by killing his accuser. But Roller forestalled his attempt with drawn sword and paid him in his own coin. "Kinsmen's service is very valuable when you need help", remarked Erik. "In desperate straits you must have good men to oblige you",47 replied Roller. "I believe", Frothi said, "that the common saying will apply to you two. The assassin's pleasure will often be short-lived and the joy of his hand brief once it has struck.48 You can't criticise a fully-justified action", Erik answered. "The difference between Grep's work and ours is that between self-defence and a malicious attack."    HED 77:   47Kallstenius (p. 23, no. 35) quotes similar but not parallel proverbs: e.g. Í þörf reynist vinr bezt (In time of need you discover your best friend).   48A similar proverb is quoted in Njáls Saga 42: Skamma stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin (The hand will not have long to rejoice over the blow). Kallstenius (p. 24, no. 38) has similar but not identical instances from Denmark.

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 11.   . . . dissiliens Greppus, ut Ericum telo traiceret, procurrit, criminantis cæce suam redimere cupiens. Quem Rollerus destricto ense occupans molitionis suæ prædamnavit exemplo. Aitque Ericus: "Optima est affinium opera opis indigo." Et Rollerus: "Inter asperos casus officiose asciscendi sunt boni." Tum Frotho: "Credo eventurum vobis, quod vulgo dici assolet, ferienti interdum breve percussionis gaudium fore nec diu manum ictu exhilarari solere." Et Ericus: "Non est arguendus, cuius operi excusamentum iustitia tribuit. Tantum enim inter nostram atque Greppi operam distat, quantum inter defendentis se atque alium impetentis interest actionem."
PF Book V. 130.   The altercation when Erik reveals Grep has slept with Hanunda, Frothi's wife:

. . . Grep sprang from his seat and ran at Erik to transfix him with his weapon, aiming to rescue his own life by killing his accuser. But Roller forestalled his attempt with drawn sword and paid him in his own coin. "Kinsmen's service is very valuable when you need help", remarked Erik. "In desperate straits you must have good men to oblige you",47 replied Roller. "I believe", Frothi said, "that the common saying will apply to you two. The assassin's pleasure will often be short-lived and the joy of his hand brief once it has struck.48 You can't criticise a fully-justified action", Erik answered. "The difference between Grep's work and ours is that between self-defence and a malicious attack."    HED 77:   47Kallstenius (p. 23, no. 35) quotes similar but not parallel proverbs: e.g. Í þörf reynist vinr bezt (In time of need you discover your best friend).   48A similar proverb is quoted in Njáls Saga 42: Skamma stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin (The hand will not have long to rejoice over the blow). Kallstenius (p. 24, no. 38) has similar but not identical instances from Denmark.
FJ Proverb word 196. Page 99. högg – . . . skamma (stutta) stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin Nj 178. 521. 703, K. ‘Stakket stund glæder hånden sig ved (sit) hug’ (ti hævnen kommer hurtig). Almindelig i brug.
Gering 9. högg (nr. 196b). – Zu den dreimal in den Njála überlieferten sprichwort: skamma stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin vgl. Saxo (ed. Holder) 13726: nec diu manum ictu exhilarari solere. S. auch Rosenberg, Nordb. aandsliv 1, 245.
K 157. hönd. . . . 88. stutta stund verdur hond hoggi feigenn (H. 43). Kort tid glæder hånd sig ved hug. Ordsproget, der kendes fra Niáls saga, og som også anføres hos G. Jónsson, forekommer bægge steder med skamma for stutta.
TPMA 10.   120. SCHLAGEN/battre/to hit 16. Die Hand freut sich nicht lange am Schlag Mlat. 217 credo euenturum uobis, quod uulgo dici assolet, ferienti interdum breue percussionis gaudium fore, nec diu manum ictu exhilarari solere Ich glaube, es wird für euch herauskommen, was man allgemein zu sagen pflegt, dass für den, der schlägt, manchmal die Freude des Schlagens kurz sei und sich die Hand nicht lange am Schlag zu freuen pflege SAXO GRAMM. 137, 25. Nord. 218 Þat er mælt, at skamma stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin Das wird gesagt, dass die Hand sich (nur) kurze Zeit am Schlag freut NJÁLS SAGA 42, 9 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 196. JÓNSSON 82). 219 Mun hér sannaz þat sem mælt er, at skamma stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin Das wird sich hier deutlich zeigen, was man sagt, dass die Hand sich (nur) kurze Zeit am Schlag freut NJÁLS SAGA 99, 9 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 196). 220 Nú er svá orðit, sem mælt er, at skamma stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin Nun ist es so gesprochen, wie es gesagt wird, dass die Hand sich (nur) kurze Zeit am Schlag freut NJÁLS SAGA 134, 3 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 196). 221 Stutta stund verdur hond hoggi feigenn (Nur) kurze Zeit freut sich die Hand am Schlag KÅLUND 88 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 196).

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 11.   . . . dissiliens Greppus, ut Ericum telo traiceret, procurrit, criminantis cæce suam redimere cupiens. Quem Rollerus destricto ense occupans molitionis suæ prædamnavit exemplo. Aitque Ericus: "Optima est affinium opera opis indigo." Et Rollerus: "Inter asperos casus officiose asciscendi sunt boni." Tum Frotho: "Credo eventurum vobis, quod vulgo dici assolet, ferienti interdum breve percussionis gaudium fore nec diu manum ictu exhilarari solere." Et Ericus: "Non est arguendus, cuius operi excusamentum iustitia tribuit. Tantum enim inter nostram atque Greppi operam distat, quantum inter defendentis se atque alium impetentis interest actionem."
PF Book V. 130.   The altercation when Erik reveals Grep has slept with Hanunda, Frothi's wife:

. . . Grep sprang from his seat and ran at Erik to transfix him with his weapon, aiming to rescue his own life by killing his accuser. But Roller forestalled his attempt with drawn sword and paid him in his own coin. "Kinsmen's service is very valuable when you need help", remarked Erik. "In desperate straits you must have good men to oblige you",47 replied Roller. "I believe", Frothi said, "that the common saying will apply to you two. The assassin's pleasure will often be short-lived and the joy of his hand brief once it has struck.48 You can't criticise a fully-justified action", Erik answered. "The difference between Grep's work and ours is that between self-defence and a malicious attack."    HED 77:   47Kallstenius (p. 23, no. 35) quotes similar but not parallel proverbs: e.g. Í þörf reynist vinr bezt (In time of need you discover your best friend).   48A similar proverb is quoted in Njáls Saga 42: Skamma stund verðr hönd höggvi fegin (The hand will not have long to rejoice over the blow). Kallstenius (p. 24, no. 38) has similar but not identical instances from Denmark.

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 12. Quibus Ericus: "Ægris iter arte profidendum est; hebetem tenenti aciem mollia ac tenera lustrare convenit; retusum habenti cultrum artuatim sectionis perquirenda est via. Quoniam ergo laboranti optima est mali mora nec quicquam in adversis necessitatis dilatione felicius, triduum apparatui peto, dummodo assequi possim a rege recens mactatæ pecudis tergus. Cui Frotho: "Corium meretur qui corio concidit," aperte superiorem petitori exprobrans casum.
PF Book V. 131.  Erik responds when Grep´s brothers threaten him:

"The sick must make strict provision for a journey; a man whose knife edge is blunt must only look for the soft and tender parts and find a way of cutting piece by piece. Someone in difficulties can't do better than stave off coming evil; delay is the surest answer to pressing circumstances, and I beg three days for preparation, provided the king will let me have the skin from the back of a freshly-slaughtered ox." "One who has fallen on a hide deserves a hide", said Frothi, openly taunting the petitioner by alluding to his earlier fall.

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 12. Quibus Ericus: "Ægris iter arte profidendum est; hebetem tenenti aciem mollia ac tenera lustrare convenit; retusum habenti cultrum artuatim sectionis perquirenda est via. Quoniam ergo laboranti optima est mali mora nec quicquam in adversis necessitatis dilatione felicius, triduum apparatui peto, dummodo assequi possim a rege recens mactatæ pecudis tergus. Cui Frotho: "Corium meretur qui corio concidit," aperte superiorem petitori exprobrans casum.
PF Book V. 131.  Erik responds when Grep´s brothers threaten him:

"The sick must make strict provision for a journey; a man whose knife edge is blunt must only look for the soft and tender parts and find a way of cutting piece by piece. Someone in difficulties can't do better than stave off coming evil; delay is the surest answer to pressing circumstances, and I beg three days for preparation, provided the king will let me have the skin from the back of a freshly-slaughtered ox." "One who has fallen on a hide deserves a hide", said Frothi, openly taunting the petitioner by alluding to his earlier fall.

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 12. Quibus Ericus: "Ægris iter arte profidendum est; hebetem tenenti aciem mollia ac tenera lustrare convenit; retusum habenti cultrum artuatim sectionis perquirenda est via. Quoniam ergo laboranti optima est mali mora nec quicquam in adversis necessitatis dilatione felicius, triduum apparatui peto, dummodo assequi possim a rege recens mactatæ pecudis tergus. Cui Frotho: "Corium meretur qui corio concidit," aperte superiorem petitori exprobrans casum.
PF Book V. 131.  Erik responds when Grep´s brothers threaten him:

"The sick must make strict provision for a journey; a man whose knife edge is blunt must only look for the soft and tender parts and find a way of cutting piece by piece. Someone in difficulties can't do better than stave off coming evil; delay is the surest answer to pressing circumstances, and I beg three days for preparation, provided the king will let me have the skin from the back of a freshly-slaughtered ox." "One who has fallen on a hide deserves a hide", said Frothi, openly taunting the petitioner by alluding to his earlier fall.

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 12. Quibus Ericus: "Ægris iter arte profidendum est; hebetem tenenti aciem mollia ac tenera lustrare convenit; retusum habenti cultrum artuatim sectionis perquirenda est via. Quoniam ergo laboranti optima est mali mora nec quicquam in adversis necessitatis dilatione felicius, triduum apparatui peto, dummodo assequi possim a rege recens mactatæ pecudis tergus. Cui Frotho: "Corium meretur qui corio concidit," aperte superiorem petitori exprobrans casum.
PF Book V. 131.  Erik responds when Grep´s brothers threaten him:

"The sick must make strict provision for a journey; a man whose knife edge is blunt must only look for the soft and tender parts and find a way of cutting piece by piece. Someone in difficulties can't do better than stave off coming evil; delay is the surest answer to pressing circumstances, and I beg three days for preparation, provided the king will let me have the skin from the back of a freshly-slaughtered ox." "One who has fallen on a hide deserves a hide", said Frothi, openly taunting the petitioner by alluding to his earlier fall.

O-R Liber quintus. 116. III. 12. Quibus Ericus: "Ægris iter arte profidendum est; hebetem tenenti aciem mollia ac tenera lustrare convenit; retusum habenti cultrum artuatim sectionis perquirenda est via. Quoniam ergo laboranti optima est mali mora nec quicquam in adversis necessitatis dilatione felicius, triduum apparatui peto, dummodo assequi possim a rege recens mactatæ pecudis tergus. Cui Frotho: "Corium meretur qui corio concidit," aperte superiorem petitori exprobrans casum.
PF Book V. 131. Frothi answers Erik's request:

Quibus Ericus: "Ægris iter arte profidendum est; hebetem tenenti aciem mollia ac tenera lustrare convenit; retusum habenti cultrum artuatim sectionis perquirenda est via. Quoniam ergo laboranti optima est mali mora nec quicquam in adversis necessitatis dilatione felicius, triduum apparatui peto, dummodo assequi possim a rege recens mactatæ pecudis tergus. "One who has fallen on a hide deserves a hide", said Frothi, openly taunting the petitioner by alluding to his earlier fall.

O-R Liber quintus. 117. III. 12. Rex apparatibus indutias tribuens Westmari filios secedere iubet, incongruum asserens etiam male meritum hospitio advenam pelli.
PF Book V. 131.  Frothi effects a truce until the time of confrontation between Erik and the sons of Vestmar:

The king granted a truce for their preparation and bade Vestmar's sons withdraw, declaring that it was wrong to drive away a stranger, even an ill-deserving one, without hospitable treatment.

O-R Liber quintus. 117. III. 13. Deinde ad investigandum supplicii modum, cuius exigendi arbitrium reginæ mandaverat, redit. Quæ cum, omissa censura, veniam lapsui precaretur, adiecit Ericus, muliebriter erratis sæpius ignoscendum nec pœnam infligendam esse, nisi correctio culpam nequivisset avertere.
PF Book V. 131.  Erik supports Hanunda's bid for pardon from Frothi for her unfaithfulness:

Next he returned to find out the queen's decision on her mode of punishment. She made no mention of her verdict, but begged to be forgiven for the misdemeanour; Erik commented that it was often right to overlook a woman's errors and withhold the penalty, if the fault could be removed and there were hope of improvement.

O-R Liber quintus. 117. III. 14. "Qui enim maiorum exemplis obviat, transfugam ac defectorem se probat." Tum Ericus: "Sapiens a sapientiori erudiri debet. Discendo enim doctrina proficit, dogmate disciplina provehitur." Contra Frotho: "Quid mihi exemplaris documenti hæc tua superfluitatis imitatio dabit?" Ad hæc Ericus: "Tutius regem fides parvula quam ingens vallat perfidia." Cui Frotho: "Ergo tu nos accuratiore ceteris obsequio complecteris?" Tum Ericus: "Nemo non natum stabulo aut ingenitum præsepio applicat. Necdum omnium experientiam accepisti. Præterea apud Gøtarum potionis usus epulo permistus esse solet; liquor cibo coniunctim superadditus comissabundos iuvat." Contra Frotho: "Impudentiorem potus aut epuli petitorem non reperi." Ad hæc Ericus: "Pauci tacentis egestatem æstimant aut silentis necessitudinem metiuntur."
PF Book V. 131-2. In a lengthy exchange Erik responds to Frothi's complaint when he repeatedly throws away the food served him:

"Whoever opposes traditional customs declares himself a rebel and deserter." "A wise man must be educated by a wiser.49 Teaching assists learning and sound doctrine enhances teaching." "What marvellous lesson will this over-affected style of yours teach me?" "A king is more stoutly defended by a small measure of loyalty than widespread knavery." "Are you suggesting that you are more devoted to me than the rest, then?" enquired Frothi. "No man ties the unborn animal to a stall or pen.50 You haven't yet experienced everything. Besides, with Gøtar we usually have some beverage to go with our feasts; liquid added to a meal pleases the banqueters." "I've never met a more shameless request for food or drink", Frothi replied, to which Erik rejoined, "Few value or calculate the needs of a man who keeps quiet."51      HED 77-78:      49Kallstenius (p. 31, no 84) has a Danish version: Den vijse skal lære aff den som vijsere er (The wise must learn from someone wiser). It is interesting to note that the king refers here to Erik's 'over-affected style' in his reply.    50Stephanius in his commentary (p. 117) quotes the proverb: Hart er wfød Hest at binde Krybbe, and gives a variant: Ont er at baase for wfød Fee (It's a bad thing to tie up the unborn beast). The meaning is equivalent to the popular saying "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched' and 'First catch your hare'. Erik is not yet prepared to accept a place in Frothi's service because the king has not yet fully accepted him.   51Kallstenius gives parallels in Danish and Icelandic (p. 29, no. 72): e.g. Fár hyggr þegjanda þorf (Few heed the wants of the silent).

O-R Liber quintus. 117. III. 14. "Qui enim maiorum exemplis obviat, transfugam ac defectorem se probat." Tum Ericus: "Sapiens a sapientiori erudiri debet. Discendo enim doctrina proficit, dogmate disciplina provehitur." Contra Frotho: "Quid mihi exemplaris documenti hæc tua superfluitatis imitatio dabit?" Ad hæc Ericus: "Tutius regem fides parvula quam ingens vallat perfidia." Cui Frotho: "Ergo tu nos accuratiore ceteris obsequio complecteris?" Tum Ericus: "Nemo non natum stabulo aut ingenitum præsepio applicat. Necdum omnium experientiam accepisti. Præterea apud Gøtarum potionis usus epulo permistus esse solet; liquor cibo coniunctim superadditus comissabundos iuvat." Contra Frotho: "Impudentiorem potus aut epuli petitorem non reperi." Ad hæc Ericus: "Pauci tacentis egestatem æstimant aut silentis necessitudinem metiuntur."
PF Book V. 131-2. In a lengthy exchange Erik responds to Frothi's complaint when he repeatedly throws away the food served him:

"Whoever opposes traditional customs declares himself a rebel and deserter." "A wise man must be educated by a wiser.49 Teaching assists learning and sound doctrine enhances teaching." "What marvellous lesson will this over-affected style of yours teach me?" "A king is more stoutly defended by a small measure of loyalty than widespread knavery." "Are you suggesting that you are more devoted to me than the rest, then?" enquired Frothi. "No man ties the unborn animal to a stall or pen.50 You haven't yet experienced everything. Besides, with Gøtar we usually have some beverage to go with our feasts; liquid added to a meal pleases the banqueters." "I've never met a more shameless request for food or drink", Frothi replied, to which Erik rejoined, "Few value or calculate the needs of a man who keeps quiet."51      HED 77-78:      49Kallstenius (p. 31, no 84) has a Danish version: Den vijse skal lære aff den som vijsere er (The wise must learn from someone wiser). It is interesting to note that the king refers here to Erik's 'over-affected style' in his reply.    50Stephanius in his commentary (p. 117) quotes the proverb: Hart er wfød Hest at binde Krybbe, and gives a variant: Ont er at baase for wfød Fee (It's a bad thing to tie up the unborn beast). The meaning is equivalent to the popular saying "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched' and 'First catch your hare'. Erik is not yet prepared to accept a place in Frothi's service because the king has not yet fully accepted him.   51Kallstenius gives parallels in Danish and Icelandic (p. 29, no. 72): e.g. Fár hyggr þegjanda þorf (Few heed the wants of the silent).

O-R Liber quintus. 117. III. 14. "Qui enim maiorum exemplis obviat, transfugam ac defectorem se probat." Tum Ericus: "Sapiens a sapientiori erudiri debet. Discendo enim doctrina proficit, dogmate disciplina provehitur." Contra Frotho: "Quid mihi exemplaris documenti hæc tua superfluitatis imitatio dabit?" Ad hæc Ericus: "Tutius regem fides parvula quam ingens vallat perfidia." Cui Frotho: "Ergo tu nos accuratiore ceteris obsequio complecteris?" Tum Ericus: "Nemo non natum stabulo aut ingenitum præsepio applicat. Necdum omnium experientiam accepisti. Præterea apud Gøtarum potionis usus epulo permistus esse solet; liquor cibo coniunctim superadditus comissabundos iuvat." Contra Frotho: "Impudentiorem potus aut epuli petitorem non reperi." Ad hæc Ericus: "Pauci tacentis egestatem æstimant aut silentis necessitudinem metiuntur."
PF Book V. 131-2. In a lengthy exchange Erik responds to Frothi's complaint when he repeatedly throws away the food served him:

"Whoever opposes traditional customs declares himself a rebel and deserter." "A wise man must be educated by a wiser.49 Teaching assists learning and sound doctrine enhances teaching." "What marvellous lesson will this over-affected style of yours teach me?" "A king is more stoutly defended by a small measure of loyalty than widespread knavery." "Are you suggesting that you are more devoted to me than the rest, then?" enquired Frothi. "No man ties the unborn animal to a stall or pen.50 You haven't yet experienced everything. Besides, with Gøtar we usually have some beverage to go with our feasts; liquid added to a meal pleases the banqueters." "I've never met a more shameless request for food or drink", Frothi replied, to which Erik rejoined, "Few value or calculate the needs of a man who keeps quiet."51      HED 77-78:   49Kallstenius (p. 31, no 84) has a Danish version: Den vijse skal lære aff den som vijsere er (The wise must learn from someone wiser). It is interesting to note that the king refers here to Erik's 'over-affected style' in his reply.    50Stephanius in his commentary (p. 117) quotes the proverb: Hart er wfød Hest at binde Krybbe, and gives a variant: Ont er at baase for wfød Fee (It's a bad thing to tie up the unborn beast). The meaning is equivalent to the popular saying "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched' and 'First catch your hare'. Erik is not yet prepared to accept a place in Frothi's service because the king has not yet fully accepted him.   51Kallstenius gives parallels in Danish and Icelandic (p. 29, no. 72): e.g. Fár hyggr þegjanda þorf (Few heed the wants of the silent).

O-R Liber quintus. 117. III. 14. "Qui enim maiorum exemplis obviat, transfugam ac defectorem se probat." Tum Ericus: "Sapiens a sapientiori erudiri debet. Discendo enim doctrina proficit, dogmate disciplina provehitur." Contra Frotho: "Quid mihi exemplaris documenti hæc tua superfluitatis imitatio dabit?" Ad hæc Ericus: "Tutius regem fides parvula quam ingens vallat perfidia." Cui Frotho: "Ergo tu nos accuratiore ceteris obsequio complecteris?" Tum Ericus: "Nemo non natum stabulo aut ingenitum præsepio applicat. Necdum omnium experientiam accepisti. Præterea apud Gøtarum potionis usus epulo permistus esse solet; liquor cibo coniunctim superadditus comissabundos iuvat." Contra Frotho: "Impudentiorem potus aut epuli petitorem non reperi." Ad hæc Ericus: "Pauci tacentis egestatem æstimant aut silentis necessitudinem metiuntur."
PF Book V. 131-2. In a lengthy exchange Erik responds to Frothi's complaint when he repeatedly throws away the food served him:

"Whoever opposes traditional customs declares himself a rebel and deserter." "A wise man must be educated by a wiser.49 Teaching assists learning and sound doctrine enhances teaching." "What marvellous lesson will this over-affected style of yours teach me?" "A king is more stoutly defended by a small measure of loyalty than widespread knavery." "Are you suggesting that you are more devoted to me than the rest, then?" enquired Frothi. "No man ties the unborn animal to a stall or pen.50 You haven't yet experienced everything. Besides, with Gøtar we usually have some beverage to go with our feasts; liquid added to a meal pleases the banqueters." "I've never met a more shameless request for food or drink", Frothi replied, to which Erik rejoined, "Few value or calculate the needs of a man who keeps quiet."51      HED 77-78:   49Kallstenius (p. 31, no 84) has a Danish version: Den vijse skal lære aff den som vijsere er (The wise must learn from someone wiser). It is interesting to note that the king refers here to Erik's 'over-affected style' in his reply.    50Stephanius in his commentary (p. 117) quotes the proverb: Hart er wfød Hest at binde Krybbe, and gives a variant: Ont er at baase for wfød Fee (It's a bad thing to tie up the unborn beast). The meaning is equivalent to the popular saying "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched' and 'First catch your hare'. Erik is not yet prepared to accept a place in Frothi's service because the king has not yet fully accepted him.   51Kallstenius gives parallels in Danish and Icelandic (p. 29, no. 72): e.g. Fár hyggr þegjanda þorf (Few heed the wants of the silent).

O-R Liber quintus. 117. III. 14. "Qui enim maiorum exemplis obviat, transfugam ac defectorem se probat." Tum Ericus: "Sapiens a sapientiori erudiri debet. Discendo enim doctrina proficit, dogmate disciplina provehitur." Contra Frotho: "Quid mihi exemplaris documenti hæc tua superfluitatis imitatio dabit?" Ad hæc Ericus: "Tutius regem fides parvula quam ingens vallat perfidia." Cui Frotho: "Ergo tu nos accuratiore ceteris obsequio complecteris?" Tum Ericus: "Nemo non natum stabulo aut ingenitum præsepio applicat. Necdum omnium experientiam accepisti. Præterea apud Gøtarum potionis usus epulo permistus esse solet; liquor cibo coniunctim superadditus comissabundos iuvat." Contra Frotho: "Impudentiorem potus aut epuli petitorem non reperi." Ad hæc Ericus: "Pauci tacentis egestatem æstimant aut silentis necessitudinem metiuntur."
PF Book V. 131-2. In a lengthy exchange Erik responds to Frothi's complaint when he repeatedly throws away the food served him:

"Whoever opposes traditional customs declares himself a rebel and deserter." "A wise man must be educated by a wiser.49 Teaching assists learning and sound doctrine enhances teaching." "What marvellous lesson will this over-affected style of yours teach me?" "A king is more stoutly defended by a small measure of loyalty than widespread knavery." "Are you suggesting that you are more devoted to me than the rest, then?" enquired Frothi. "No man ties the unborn animal to a stall or pen.50 You haven't yet experienced everything. Besides, with Gøtar we usually have some beverage to go with our feasts; liquid added to a meal pleases the banqueters." "I've never met a more shameless request for food or drink", Frothi replied, to which Erik rejoined, "Few value or calculate the needs of a man who keeps quiet."51      HED 77-78:   49Kallstenius (p. 31, no 84) has a Danish version: Den vijse skal lære aff den som vijsere er (The wise must learn from someone wiser). It is interesting to note that the king refers here to Erik's 'over-affected style' in his reply.    50Stephanius in his commentary (p. 117) quotes the proverb: Hart er wfød Hest at binde Krybbe, and gives a variant: Ont er at baase for wfød Fee (It's a bad thing to tie up the unborn beast). The meaning is equivalent to the popular saying "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched' and 'First catch your hare'. Erik is not yet prepared to accept a place in Frothi's service because the king has not yet fully accepted him.   51Kallstenius gives parallels in Danish and Icelandic (p. 29, no. 72): e.g. Fár hyggr þegjanda þorf (Few heed the wants of the silent).

O-R Liber quintus. 117. III. 14. "Qui enim maiorum exemplis obviat, transfugam ac defectorem se probat." Tum Ericus: "Sapiens a sapientiori erudiri debet. Discendo enim doctrina proficit, dogmate disciplina provehitur." Contra Frotho: "Quid mihi exemplaris documenti hæc tua superfluitatis imitatio dabit?" Ad hæc Ericus: "Tutius regem fides parvula quam ingens vallat perfidia." Cui Frotho: "Ergo tu nos accuratiore ceteris obsequio complecteris?" Tum Ericus: "Nemo non natum stabulo aut ingenitum præsepio applicat. Necdum omnium experientiam accepisti. Præterea apud Gøtarum potionis usus epulo permistus esse solet; liquor cibo coniunctim superadditus comissabundos iuvat." Contra Frotho: "Impudentiorem potus aut epuli petitorem non reperi." Ad hæc Ericus: "Pauci tacentis egestatem æstimant aut silentis necessitudinem metiuntur."
PF Book V. 131-2. In a lengthy exchange Erik responds to Frothi's complaint when he repeatedly throws away the food served him:

"Whoever opposes traditional customs declares himself a rebel and deserter." "A wise man must be educated by a wiser.49 Teaching assists learning and sound doctrine enhances teaching." "What marvellous lesson will this over-affected style of yours teach me?" "A king is more stoutly defended by a small measure of loyalty than widespread knavery." "Are you suggesting that you are more devoted to me than the rest, then?" enquired Frothi. "No man ties the unborn animal to a stall or pen.50 You haven't yet experienced everything. Besides, with Gøtar we usually have some beverage to go with our feasts; liquid added to a meal pleases the banqueters." "I've never met a more shameless request for food or drink", Frothi replied, to which Erik rejoined, "Few value or calculate the needs of a man who keeps quiet."51      HED 77-78:   49Kallstenius (p. 31, no 84) has a Danish version: Den vijse skal lære aff den som vijsere er (The wise must learn from someone wiser). It is interesting to note that the king refers here to Erik's 'over-affected style' in his reply.    50Stephanius in his commentary (p. 117) quotes the proverb: Hart er wfød Hest at binde Krybbe, and gives a variant: Ont er at baase for wfød Fee (It's a bad thing to tie up the unborn beast). The meaning is equivalent to the popular saying "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched' and 'First catch your hare'. Erik is not yet prepared to accept a place in Frothi's service because the king has not yet fully accepted him.   51Kallstenius gives parallels in Danish and Icelandic (p. 29, no. 72): e.g. Fár hyggr þegjanda þorf (Few heed the wants of the silent).

O-R Liber quintus. 117. III. 14. "Qui enim maiorum exemplis obviat, transfugam ac defectorem se probat." Tum Ericus: "Sapiens a sapientiori erudiri debet. Discendo enim doctrina proficit, dogmate disciplina provehitur." Contra Frotho: "Quid mihi exemplaris documenti hæc tua superfluitatis imitatio dabit?" Ad hæc Ericus: "Tutius regem fides parvula quam ingens vallat perfidia." Cui Frotho: "Ergo tu nos accuratiore ceteris obsequio complecteris?" Tum Ericus: "Nemo non natum stabulo aut ingenitum præsepio applicat. Necdum omnium experientiam accepisti. Præterea apud Gøtarum potionis usus epulo permistus esse solet; liquor cibo coniunctim superadditus comissabundos iuvat." Contra Frotho: "Impudentiorem potus aut epuli petitorem non reperi." Ad hæc Ericus: "Pauci tacentis egestatem æstimant aut silentis necessitudinem metiuntur."
PF Book V. 131-2. In a lengthy exchange Erik responds to Frothi's complaint when he repeatedly throws away the food served him:

"Whoever opposes traditional customs declares himself a rebel and deserter." "A wise man must be educated by a wiser.49 Teaching assists learning and sound doctrine enhances teaching." "What marvellous lesson will this over-affected style of yours teach me?" "A king is more stoutly defended by a small measure of loyalty than widespread knavery." "Are you suggesting that you are more devoted to me than the rest, then?" enquired Frothi. "No man ties the unborn animal to a stall or pen.50 You haven't yet experienced everything. Besides, with Gøtar we usually have some beverage to go with our feasts; liquid added to a meal pleases the banqueters." "I've never met a more shameless request for food or drink", Frothi replied, to which Erik rejoined, "Few value or calculate the needs of a man who keeps quiet."51      HED 77-78:   49Kallstenius (p. 31, no 84) has a Danish version: Den vijse skal lære aff den som vijsere er (The wise must learn from someone wiser). It is interesting to note that the king refers here to Erik's 'over-affected style' in his reply.    50Stephanius in his commentary (p. 117) quotes the proverb: Hart er wfød Hest at binde Krybbe, and gives a variant: Ont er at baase for wfød Fee (It's a bad thing to tie up the unborn beast). The meaning is equivalent to the popular saying "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched' and 'First catch your hare'. Erik is not yet prepared to accept a place in Frothi's service because the king has not yet fully accepted him.   51Kallstenius gives parallels in Danish and Icelandic (p. 29, no. 72): e.g. Fár hyggr þegjanda þorf (Few heed the wants of the silent).

O-R Liber quintus. 118. III. 15. "Fatuum," inquit, "opera prodit. Apud nos intacta virginum libertas haberi solet."
PF Book V. 132.  Frothi when Erik makes a grab for Gunvara, Frothi´s sister, pretending to think the king has given her to him:

"A simpleton is revealed by his actions. Among us a maiden's freedom is regarded as inviolable."

O-R Liber quintus. 118. III. 15. "Fatuum," inquit, "opera prodit. Apud nos intacta virginum libertas haberi solet."
PF Book V. 132.  Frothi when Erik makes a grab for Gunvara, Frothi´s sister, pretending to think the king has given her to him:

"A simpleton is revealed by his actions. Among us a maiden's freedom is regarded as inviolable."

O-R Liber quintus. 118. III. 15. Rex, promissi errore recognito, puellam tradidit, nolens incuriæ vitium levitate rescindere, quo gravior pollicentis videretur auctoritas; quamquam inania pacta revocare maturitati potius quam inconstantiæ deputetur.
PF Book V. 132.  Frothi capitulates, giving his sister to Erik:

The king realised the mistake of his promise and gave him the girl, for he did not wish to be fickle and repeal what was the fault of his inattentiveness. The weight of his word must appear strong; yet to go back on foolish agreements is counted the mark of a mature rather than a shifting judgment.
TPMA 7. 130. KÖNIG/roi/king 3. Voraussetzungen, die ein (guter) König erfüllen muss 3.3 Der König muss mit Weisheit, tugend, Gerechtigkeit und Güte regieren 3.3.5. Der König soll sein Wort halten5   Nord. 80 Fastorðr skyli . . . vesa þengill Ein König soll sein Wort halten SIGVATR 11, 10 (= GERING 30). 81 Eigi muntu, konungr, vilja ganga á bak orðum þínum Du wirst, König, deine worte nicht zurücknehmen wollen SNORRI, HEIMSKRINGLA 163, 9 (Ólafs saga Tryggvasonar 28). 82 Oc er þat konungligt at hallda vel orþ sinn Und es ist königlich, sein Wort gut zu halten MORKINSKINNA 84, 39. 83 Þvi at eigi byriar konungligu valldi þvi at heita, sem at falsi reyniz Denn es ziemt sich für die königliche Herrschaft nicht, das zu versprechen, was sich als Betrug erweist HEIL. M. S. I, 414, 18 (Katerine saga).

O-R Liber quintus. 118. III. 15. Rex, promissi errore recognito, puellam tradidit, nolens incuriæ vitium levitate rescindere, quo gravior pollicentis videretur auctoritas; quamquam inania pacta revocare maturitati potius quam inconstantiæ deputetur.
PF Book V. 132.  Frothi capitulates, giving his sister to Erik:

The king realised the mistake of his promise and gave him the girl, for he did not wish to be fickle and repeal what was the fault of his inattentiveness. The weight of his word must appear strong; yet to go back on foolish agreements is counted the mark of a mature rather than a shifting judgment.

O-R Liber quintus. 118. III. 15. Rex, promissi errore recognito, puellam tradidit, nolens incuriæ vitium levitate rescindere, quo gravior pollicentis videretur auctoritas; quamquam inania pacta revocare maturitati potius quam inconstantiæ deputetur.
PF Book V. 132.  Frothi capitulates, giving his sister to Erik:

The king realised the mistake of his promise and gave him the girl, for he did not wish to be fickle and repeal what was the fault of his inattentiveness. The weight of his word must appear strong; yet to go back on foolish agreements is counted the mark of a mature rather than a shifting judgment.

O-R Liber quintus. 119. III. 18. Quod Frotho videns: "Arduum," inquit, "reor contra fortem fune contendere." Et Ericus: "Arduum utique, cum corpori struma insidet aut tergum occupat gibbus."
PF Book V. 133.  Frothi comments on the unfairness of the rope pulling contest between Erik and Vestmar:
When Frothi saw this he said: "I think it's difficult to tug the rope against a strong man."56"Diffcult, certainly," said Erik, "when you have a tumour on your body or a hump on your back."     HED 78:   56This is close to a saying in Njáls Saga 6: Við ramman mun reip at draga (This is tugging against a strong opponent), found again in Hrólfs Saga kraka 1. The metaphor is that of a tug-of-war, and the meaning is that it is useless to contend against a force too strong to resist; the implication in the saga passages is that magic powers are involved (cf. Kallstenius, p. 22, no. 31).
FJ Proverb word 311. Page 180. reip – (þar er) við ramman reip at draga Nj 22, Fms II 107. ‘Det er en stærk mand at trække reb med’, om noget meget vanskeligt. Alml. i brug. Findes også hos Låle (I 25).
Gering 11. reip (nr. 331). – Die redensart: hér er við ramman reip at draga findet sich auch in der Hrólfs s. kraka c. 1 (Fas. 1, 416), Vatnsd. c. 44 (Forns. 754) und Kjalnes. s. c. 3 (Ísl. s. II2, 4089).
Saxo (Kallstenius) 22-3. Kraft. 31. Arduum, inquit, reor contra fortem fune contendere, s. 14027. – Illt er vid ramman reip ad draga, se JR II n:r 179 (s. 19). Jfr D n:r 304 och Rosenberg a. a. II s. 601 not.
OS II.   79. REIP   VI RAMMAN ER REIP A DRAGA "vi mikla ugleika er a etja, vi erfian andsting er a fst". Ortaki kemur nokkrum sinnum fyrir fornritum, sbr. t. d.: "Vi ramman mun reip at draga", segir Gunnhildr, "ok leyfi r honum at fara sem honum gegnir bezt". F XII, 20, sbr. enn fremur VIII, 122, FMS II, 107, FAS I, 4. ess m geta, a ortaki kemur fyrir tveimur gervum hj Saxo (SAXO LIB V, 119; XII, 333 (Kbh. 1931). Fr 19. ld eru kunnig afbrigin: eiga vi ramman reip a draga og draga reip vi hinn ramma: Hann vi ramman reip a draga (GJ 129 (OB)) – a taka v, sem boi er og draga ekki reip vi hinn ramma. JSBRF2, 125 (OB). Ortaki rtur a rekja til reipdrttar, vi ramman (srsttt lo.) merkir " mti sterkum manni". HHO 309, ES Skrni 1954, 217.
TPMA 11.   175. STRICK/corde/rope 2. Ziehen am Strick (Seil) 2.3 Gegen einem Starken am Seil ziehen
Nord. 37 Er þar við ramman reip at draga Man muss dort gegen einen Starken am Seil ziehen GROSSE ÓLÁFS SAGA TRYGGVASONAR 184 (→FMS II, 170 [=JÓNSSON, ARKIV 331]). 38 Hér er við ramman reip at draga Hier muss man gegen einen Starken am Strick ziehen HRÓLFS SAGA KRAKA 1 (→FAS I, 4 [GERING S. 11]). 39 Ok má vera, at við ramman væri reip at draga Und es mag sein, dass wir gegen einen Starken am Seil habe ziehen müssen VATNSDŒLA SAGA 44, 30 (= GERING S. 11). 40 Vid ramman mun reip at draga (Hier) muss man gegen einen Starken am Seil ziehen NJÁLS SAGA 6, 5 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV, 331. JÓNSSON, 136). 41 Creditur incautum forti resti (lies: restis) dare tractum. – Onth ær meth ramme stærcke reeb (lies: meth ramme reeb) at drawæ Es gilt als unvorsichtig, mit einem Starken am Seil zu ziehen. – Es ist schlecht, mit einem Starken am Seil zu ziehen Låle 204. 42 Est graue grandeuum (lies mit Låle S. 259: gradiuum) per restis vincere tractum. – Thet ær onth at drawe reeb meth gamlæ (lies mit Druck B: ramme) Es ist schwierig, den Kampftüchtigen durch das Ziehen des Seiles zu besiegen. – Es ist schlecht, mit einem Starken am Seil zu ziehen EBD. 338. 43 Nú er við raman reip at draga Man muss jetzt gegen einen Starken am Seil ziehen KJALNESINGA SAGA 3 S. 11 (= GERING S. 11).

O-R Liber quintus. 119. III. 19. At Frothone Ericum iactu sicæ traicere meditante, conscia fraternæ mentis Gunwara, sponsum periculi præmonitura, neminem inquit sapientem fore, qui sui provisor non sit. Quo dicto Ericus propulsandæ fraudis admonitus suggestam sibi cautelam argutus excepit. Continuo namque exsiliens triumphalem ait fore gloriam sapientis, dolum suimet ultorem exsistere, modesto vocationis genere insidiantis ingenium lacerans. Quem cum rex repentino cultri iactu declinantem occupare non posset, adverso parieti errabundum incidit ferrum. Tunc sic Ericus: "Porrigenda sunt amicis munera, non iactanda; probabile fecisses donum, si comitem ferro vaginam dedisses."
PF Book V. 133.  Erik's eloquence when Frothi is attempting to kill him with a knife:
While Frothi contemplated hurling his dagger to transfix Erik, Gunvara, sensing her brother's purpose and wishing to warn her betrothed of his peril, stated that a person could only be called wise if he kept watch for his safety. Perceptive of her caution, Erik alerted himself against treachery and, jumping up immediately, declared that the wise man's fame would triumph but guile carried its own destruction, thus challenging by a modest hint Frothi's intention to spring a surprise on him. Even so, the king suddenly flung the knife, but Erik successfully dodged it and it struck the opposite wall. "You should hand presents to your friends, not throw them," said Erik;  "it would have made a commendable gift if you'd offered the sheath as its companion."

O-R Liber quintus. 119. III. 19. At Frothone Ericum iactu sicæ traicere meditante, conscia fraternæ mentis Gunwara, sponsum periculi præmonitura, neminem inquit sapientem fore, qui sui provisor non sit. Quo dicto Ericus propulsandæ fraudis admonitus suggestam sibi cautelam argutus excepit. Continuo namque exsiliens triumphalem ait fore gloriam sapientis, dolum suimet ultorem exsistere, modesto vocationis genere insidiantis ingenium lacerans. Quem cum rex repentino cultri iactu declinantem occupare non posset, adverso parieti errabundum incidit ferrum. Tunc sic Ericus: "Porrigenda sunt amicis munera, non iactanda; probabile fecisses donum, si comitem ferro vaginam dedisses."
PF Book V. 133.  Erik's eloquence when Frothi is attempting to kill him with a knife:
While Frothi contemplated hurling his dagger to transfix Erik, Gunvara, sensing her brother's purpose and wishing to warn her betrothed of his peril, stated that a person could only be called wise if he kept watch for his safety. Perceptive of her caution, Erik alerted himself against treachery and, jumping up immediately, declared that the wise man's fame would triumph but guile carried its own destruction, thus challenging by a modest hint Frothi's intention to spring a surprise on him. Even so, the king suddenly flung the knife, but Erik successfully dodged it and it struck the opposite wall. "You should hand presents to your friends, not throw them," said Erik;  "it would have made a commendable gift if you'd offered the sheath as its companion."

O-R Liber quintus. 119. III. 19. At Frothone Ericum iactu sicæ traicere meditante, conscia fraternæ mentis Gunwara, sponsum periculi præmonitura, neminem inquit sapientem fore, qui sui provisor non sit. Quo dicto Ericus propulsandæ fraudis admonitus suggestam sibi cautelam argutus excepit. Continuo namque exsiliens triumphalem ait fore gloriam sapientis, dolum suimet ultorem exsistere, modesto vocationis genere insidiantis ingenium lacerans. Quem cum rex repentino cultri iactu declinantem occupare non posset, adverso parieti errabundum incidit ferrum. Tunc sic Ericus: "Porrigenda sunt amicis munera, non iactanda; probabile fecisses donum, si comitem ferro vaginam dedisses."
PF Book V. 133.  Erik's eloquence when Frothi is attempting to kill him with a knife:
While Frothi contemplated hurling his dagger to transfix Erik, Gunvara, sensing her brother's purpose and wishing to warn her betrothed of his peril, stated that a person could only be called wise if he kept watch for his safety. Perceptive of her caution, Erik alerted himself against treachery and, jumping up immediately, declared that the wise man's fame would triumph but guile carried its own destruction, thus challenging by a modest hint Frothi's intention to spring a surprise on him. Even so, the king suddenly flung the knife, but Erik successfully dodged it and it struck the opposite wall. "You should hand presents to your friends, not throw them," said Erik;  "it would have made a commendable gift if you'd offered the sheath as its companion."

O-R Liber quintus. 119. III. 19. At Frothone Ericum iactu sicæ traicere meditante, conscia fraternæ mentis Gunwara, sponsum periculi præmonitura, neminem inquit sapientem fore, qui sui provisor non sit. Quo dicto Ericus propulsandæ fraudis admonitus suggestam sibi cautelam argutus excepit. Continuo namque exsiliens triumphalem ait fore gloriam sapientis, dolum suimet ultorem exsistere, modesto vocationis genere insidiantis ingenium lacerans. Quem cum rex repentino cultri iactu declinantem occupare non posset, adverso parieti errabundum incidit ferrum. Tunc sic Ericus: "Porrigenda sunt amicis munera, non iactanda; probabile fecisses donum, si comitem ferro vaginam dedisses."
PF Book V. 133.  Erik's eloquence when Frothi is attempting to kill him with a knife:
While Frothi contemplated hurling his dagger to transfix Erik, Gunvara, sensing her brother's purpose and wishing to warn her betrothed of his peril, stated that a person could only be called wise if he kept watch for his safety. Perceptive of her caution, Erik alerted himself against treachery and, jumping up immediately, declared that the wise man's fame would triumph but guile carried its own destruction, thus challenging by a modest hint Frothi's intention to spring a surprise on him. Even so, the king suddenly flung the kinfe, but Erik successfully dodged it and it struck the opposite wall. "You should hand presents to your friends, not throw them," said Erik;  "it would have made a commendable gift if you'd offered the sheath as its companion."
Havamal, presents for friends, and Erik's joke about it.
Hildebrandslied. 36-8:   Hadubrant gima[ha]lta, Hilitbrantes sunu:/"Mit geru scal man geba infahan/ort wider orte."

O-R Liber quintus. 119. III. 20. Noctu Gunwara, tacite excitato eo, fuga opus esse proponit, perquam utile referens rebus integris incolumi redire curru.
PF Book V. 134.  Gunvara warns Erik of the need to escape:
During the night Gunvara quietly awoke Erik, declaring they must flee; it would be a distinct advantage if they could return safely while the wagon was still sound.58  HED 79:   58This appears to be a proverb, and Kallstenius (p. 25, no. 50) quotes the Icelandic equivalent: Hollast er í heilum vagni heim að aka (It's best to drive home while the wagon's still sound), cf. the English expression 'Go while the going's good'.
FJ Proverb word 428. Page 196. vagn – gott (bezt) heilum vagni heim at aka Eg 119, Icels I 219, Flat II 282, Fas II 115, Karl. 388. ‘Det er godt (bedst) at køre hjem med en hel vogn’ (hel = ubeskadiget).
TPMA 12.   311. WAGEN (Subst.)/voiture/waggon 2. Fahren mit dem Wagen 2.1. Es ist gut, mit ganzem Wagen heimzufahren   Mlat. 24   . . . utile referens, rebus integris incolumni redire curru  Indem er darlegte, es sei von Nutzen, dann zurückzukehren, wenn die Verhältnisse noch gut stünden und der Wagen noch unbeschädigt sei SAXO GRAMM. 141, 16.   Nord. 25-27 Ok er gott heilum vagni heim at aka Und es ist gut, mit unbeschädigtem Wagen heimzufahren SVERRIS SAGA 76 (→FMS VIII, 186).  SNORRI, ÓLÁFS SAGA HELGA 147 (→FMS IV, 364).  SNORRI, HEIMSKRINGLA 345, 29 (Óláfs saga helga 151). 28 Ok er nú gott heilum vagni heim at aka Und es ist nun gut . . . HARALDS SAGA HARÐRÁÐA 8 (→FMS VI, 151). 29 Er nu gott heilum vagni heim at aka Es ist nun gut .. . . ORKNEYINGA SAGA 106. S. 318, 19.  30 Þá var gott heilum vagni heim at aka Damals sei es gut gewesen, dass er mit unbeschädigtem Wagen heimgefahren sei EGILS SAGA 38, 7 (=JÓNSSON, ARKIV 428. JÓNSSON 173). 31 Þvíat betra er heilum vagne heim at aka . . . Denn es ist besser, mit unbeschädigtem Wagen heimzufahren ALEXANDERS SAGA 61. 32 Ok kvað gott heilum vagni heim at aka Und er sagte, es sei gut . . . KETILS SAGA HÆNGS 2 (→FAS II, 115 [=JÓNSSON, ARKIV 428]).

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 21. "Frustra voluntem perire servastis. Aquis mihi interire negatum est, ferri saltem officio moriar. A nemine victus tuo primum, Erice, ingenio cessi, hoc infelicior, quod, qui illustribus viris invictus exstiti, plebeio de me victoriam præbui. Ingens hoc regii pudoris irritamentum est. Sufficit hæc sola duci ad moriendum causa, cui nihil gloria magis placere convenit; qua si careat, ceterorum inopem putes. Nihil enim in rege celebrius fama."
PF Book V. 134
.  Frothi, defeated by a commoner, wants to die:
"In vain you have saved one who wished to perish. As you forbade me to drown, at least I can stab myself. Hitherto defeated by no one, I yielded first to your cleverness, Erik, and more miserably because, whereas I had never been vanquished by famous men, I let a commoner beat me. That provokes great shame in a monarch. For a leader this is sufficient reason for dying, since glory is rightly his greatest pleasure; where that has gone you can be sure everything else has. Nothing about a ruler is talked of more than his renown."

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 21. "Frustra voluntem perire servastis. Aquis mihi interire negatum est, ferri saltem officio moriar. A nemine victus tuo primum, Erice, ingenio cessi, hoc infelicior, quod, qui illustribus viris invictus exstiti, plebeio de me victoriam præbui. Ingens hoc regii pudoris irritamentum est. Sufficit hæc sola duci ad moriendum causa, cui nihil gloria magis placere convenit; qua si careat, ceterorum inopem putes. Nihil enim in rege celebrius fama."
PF Book V. 134
.  Frothi, defeated by a commoner, wants to die:
"In vain you have saved one who wished to perish. As you forbade me to drown, at least I can stab myself. Hitherto defeated by no one, I yielded first to your cleverness, Erik, and more miserably because, whereas I had never been vanquished by famous men, I let a commoner beat me. That provokes great shame in a monarch. For a leader this is sufficient reason for dying, since glory is rightly his greatest pleasure; where that has gone you can be sure everything else has. Nothing about a ruler is talked of more than his renown."
TPMA 9. 386. Fylki skal til frægðar hafa

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 21. "Frustra voluntem perire servastis. Aquis mihi interire negatum est, ferri saltem officio moriar. A nemine victus tuo primum, Erice, ingenio cessi, hoc infelicior, quod, qui illustribus viris invictus exstiti, plebeio de me victoriam præbui. Ingens hoc regii pudoris irritamentum est. Sufficit hæc sola duci ad moriendum causa, cui nihil gloria magis placere convenit; qua si careat, ceterorum inopem putes. Nihil enim in rege celebrius fama."
PF Book V. 134
.  Frothi, defeated by a commoner, wants to die:
"In vain you have saved one who wished to perish. As you forbade me to drown, at least I can stab myself. Hitherto defeated by no one, I yielded first to your cleverness, Erik, and more miserably because, whereas I had never been vanquished by famous men, I let a commoner beat me. That provokes great shame in a monarch. For a leader this is sufficient reason for dying, since glory is rightly his greatest pleasure; where that has gone you can be sure everything else has. Nothing about a ruler is talked of more than his renown."

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 21. "Quid vitæ productio proderit, solam tristitiæ memoriam relatura? Nihil calamitosis iucundius morte. Felix est obitus, qui succedit optatus; hic non temporum dulcedinem tollit, sed rerum fastidium consumit. In prosperis salus, in adversis melius fatum petitur."
PF Book V. 135. Frothi, defeated by a commoner, wants to die, his speech continued:
"What advantage will a lengthy life be if it only carries gloomy memories
? The happiest event for sufferers is death. A man's departure is fortunate if it comes when desired; it does not remove any pleasantness in his existence, merely destroys his nausea at the world. Good times are for living, in bad situations we had best seek our end."

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 21. "Quid vitæ productio proderit, solam tristitiæ memoriam relatura? Nihil calamitosis iucundius morte. Felix est obitus, qui succedit optatus; hic non temporum dulcedinem tollit, sed rerum fastidium consumit. In prosperis salus, in adversis melius fatum petitur."
PF Book V. 135.
Frothi, defeated by a commoner, wants to die, his speech continued:
"What advantage will a lengthy life be if it only carries gloomy memories? The happiest event for sufferers is death. A man's departure is fortunate if it comes when desired; it does not remove any pleasantness in his existence, merely destroys his nausea at the world. Good times are for living, in bad situations we had best seek our end."

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 21. "Quid vitæ productio proderit, solam tristitiæ memoriam relatura? Nihil calamitosis iucundius morte. Felix est obitus, qui succedit optatus; hic non temporum dulcedinem tollit, sed rerum fastidium consumit. In prosperis salus, in adversis melius fatum petitur."
PF Book V. 135.
 Frothi, defeated by a commoner, wants to die, his speech continued:
"What advantage will a lengthy life be if it only carries gloomy memories? The happiest event for sufferers is death. A man's departure is fortunate if it comes when desired; it does not remove any pleasantness in his existence, merely destroys his nausea at the world. Good times are for living, in bad situations we had best seek our end."

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 21. "Quid vitæ productio proderit, solam tristitiæ memoriam relatura? Nihil calamitosis iucundius morte. Felix est obitus, qui succedit optatus; hic non temporum dulcedinem tollit, sed rerum fastidium consumit. In prosperis salus, in adversis melius fatum petitur."
PF Book V. 135.
 Frothi, defeated by a commoner, wants to die, his speech continued:
"What advantage will a lengthy life be if it only carries gloomy memories? The happiest event for sufferers is death. A man's departure is fortunate if it comes when desired; it does not remove any pleasantness in his existence, merely destroys his nausea at the world. Good times are for living, in bad situations we had best seek our end."

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 21. "Nihil, quod resartum est, integri splendorem habebit."
PF Book V. 135.
 Frothi's lament continued:
"No mended article will ever regain its original sheen."61     HED 79:   
61Kallstenius (p. 28, no. 67) has a popular form of this saying from Denmark: Brudet bliffuer aldrig ret helt (Once broken, never really whole).

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 21.
PF Book V. 135.
 Frothi's lament continued:
"
My heart, let me tell you, brims with harmful intent, something often rated as tantamount to crime."

O-R Liber quintus. 120. III. 22. "Sane quidem ab ipsis prohibitum est benignum in alios in se parricidam fore."
PF Book V. 135.
 Erik replies:
"Surely the heavens forbid a benefactor of others to be his own unnatural murderer."

O-R Liber quintus. 121. III. 22. "Nemo modeste se in prosperis agit, qui adversa tolerare non didicit. Præterea omnis bonorum usus post agnita gratius mala percipitur; iucundior est voluptas, quæ rerum amaritudini succedit."
PF Book V. 135.
 Erik replies:
"A man must learn to grin and bear it if he is going to behave with self-control during prosperity; he can see how to use his affluence provided he has willingly acknowledged evil times, and besides, pleasure following on bitter circumstances is sweeter.62     HED 79:  62Kallstenius (p. 26, no. 55) gives the Danish versions: Mand veed da først huad det søde er / naar mand haffuer smagt det Sure (You won't know what's sweet till you've tasted the sour).

O-R Liber quintus. 121. III. 22. "Nemo modeste se in prosperis agit, qui adversa tolerare non didicit. Præterea omnis bonorum usus post agnita gratius mala percipitur; iucundior est voluptas, quæ rerum amaritudini succedit."
PF Book V. 135.
 Erik replies:
"A man must learn to grin and bear it if he is going to behave with self-control during prosperity; he can see how to use his affluence provided he has willingly acknowledged evil times, and besides, pleasure following on bitter circumstances is sweeter.62     HED 79:  62Kallstenius (p. 26, no. 55) gives the Danish versions: Mand veed da først huad det søde er / naar mand haffuer smagt det Sure (You won't know what's sweet till you've tasted the sour).

O-R Liber quintus. 121. III. 22. "Nemo modeste se in prosperis agit, qui adversa tolerare non didicit. Præterea omnis bonorum usus post agnita gratius mala percipitur; iucundior est voluptas, quæ rerum amaritudini succedit."
PF Book V. 135.
 Erik replies:
"A man must learn to grin and bear it if he is going to behave with self-control furing prosperity; he can see how to use his affluence provided he has willingly acknowledged evil times, and besides, pleasure following on bitter circumstances is sweeter.62     HED 79:  62Kallstenius (p. 26, no. 55) gives the Danish versions: Mand veed da først huad det søde er / naar mand haffuer smagt det Sure (You won't know what's sweet till you've tasted the sour).

O-R Liber quintus. 121. III. 22. "Quovis effeminator est, qui aversorum metu vivendi fiduciam perdit."
PF Book V. 135.
 Erik replies:
"Most unmanly of all is the one who fears hardship so much he loses his zest to remain alive."

O-R Liber quintus. 121. III. 22. "Quis tam amens, ut dubium fortunæ habitum proprio ulcisci interitu velit? Quis adeo felix vixit, quin tristior illum quandoque fortuna pulsaret?"
PF Book V. 136.
 Erik replies:
"Who is insane enough to punish vacillating Fortune by suicide? Has anyone lived such a happy existence that he never struck a bad patch?"

O-R Liber quintus. 121. III. 22. "Quis tam amens, ut dubium fortunæ habitum proprio ulcisci interitu velit? Quis adeo felix vixit, quin tristior illum quandoque fortuna pulsaret?"
PF Book V. 136.
 Erik replies:
"Who is insane enough to punish vacillating Fortune by suicide? Has anyone lived such a happy existence that he never struck a bad patch?"

O-R Liber quintus. 121. III. 22. "Insipidus est, qui numquam mæroris poculum degustavit; nemo dura non passus temperanter facilibus utitur."
PF Book V. 136. "A man's palate is limited if he has never tasted the cup of grief; no one without experience of hard times can live temperately when things are easy."

O-R Liber quintus. 121. III. 22. "Cave, ne ab re ira animum obstines. Nulla te rerum iactura concussit, nihil libertati tuæ detractum est."
PF Book V. 136.
 Erik replies:
"Please do no let anger harden your mind against your own interests, since you have been damaged by no loss of property, nor has your freedom been eroded."

O-R Liber quintus. 122. III. 25. Deinde, sumptis secum coniugibus, navigationem in Norvagiam referunt; neque enim illas a virorum latere aut viæ longinquitas aut futuri periculi metus divellere poterat, affirmantes, ut plumam hirto, sic se maritis cohæsuras fore.
PF Book V. 137.  Erik and Roller return to Norway with their new wives:
Afterwards they sailed back to Norway taking their wives with them; neither the length of the voyage nor fears of peril could tear them from their husbands' sides, for each declared she would stick to her partner like a feather to bristles.65   HED 79:  65This is one of Saxo's idiomatic phrases; it is noted with other examples by Powell in his preface to Elton's translation (p. lxxxix).

O-R Liber quintus. 122. III. 26. Cuius Ericus intentione comperta convocatis sociis refert suam necdum cautibus abstitisse fortunam. Ceterum spectare se fascem labilem esse, qui vinculo non firmetur, perindeque omne pœnæ pondus repente decidere, quod culpæ catena non fixerit.
PF Book V. 137.
 Erik discovers Gøtar's plan to separate him from his wife and marry his sister to him:
When Erik discovered this scheme he called his comrades together and informed them that his destiny was not yet clear of the reefs. He could see that a bundle was liable to slip if it were not securely tied,67 and in the same way, if it were not fastened by a chain of guilt, the whole weight of a punishment could suddenly collapse.    HED 79:     67Kallstenius (p. 22, no. 26) quotes two Icelandic forms of this saying: Fellst fetillaus byrði (The unbound bundle falls apart) and Laus er bandlaus baggi (the untied bag stays loose). The obvious meaning is that a job has to be done properly and the ends tied up, and may refer in the first place to Erik´s marriage, which the king is plotting to undo; Saxon seems to extend the meaning by applying it to the innocent escaping scatheless from threats and perils.

O-R Liber quintus. 122. III. 26. Cuius Ericus intentione comperta convocatis sociis refert suam necdum cautibus abstitisse fortunam. Ceterum spectare se fascem labilem esse, qui vinculo non firmetur, perindeque omne pœnæ pondus repente decidere, quod culpæ catena non fixerit.
PF Book V. 137.
 Erik discovers Gøtar's plan to separate him from his wife and marry his sister to him:
When Erik discovered this scheme he called his comrades together and informed them that his destiny was not yet clear of the reefs. He could see that a bundle was liable to slip if it were not securely tied,67 and in the same way, if it were not fastened by a chain of guilt, the whole weight of a punishment could suddenly collapse.    HED 79:     67Kallstenius (p. 22, no. 26) quotes two Icelandic forms of this saying: Fellst fetillaus byrði (The unbound bundle falls apart) and Laus er bandlaus baggi (the untied bag stays loose). The obvious meaning is that a job has to be done properly and the ends tied up, and may refer in the first place to Erik´s marriage, which the king is plotting to undo; Saxon seems to extend the meaning by applying it to the innocent escaping scatheless from threats and perils.

O-R Liber quintus. 122. III. 26. Deinde fugam eos paulisper fingere oportere, si primum a Gøtaro lacessiti forent, iustiorem belli titulum habituros. Manum siquidem capitis periculo obici omni iure permissum esse. Raro autem quemquam commissam cum innoxiis pugnam feliciter exsequi posse.
PF Book V. 137.
 Erik plans response to his discovery of Gøtar's plan to separate him from his wife and marry his sister to him:
Were Gøtar to take the initiative in challenging them, they should pretend to flee for a short while and would thereby have a sounder pretext for battling with him. The hand had every right to resist when the head was endangered.68Anyone who started a broil with blameless men seldom rejoiced in the consequences.   HED 79:    68Kallstenius (p. 28, no. 68) quotes the Icelandic version: Skylt er hendi af höfði að bera (the hand is bound to protect the head).

O-R Liber quintus. 122. III. 26. Deinde fugam eos paulisper fingere oportere, si primum a Gøtaro lacessiti forent, iustiorem belli titulum habituros. Manum siquidem capitis periculo obici omni iure permissum esse. Raro autem quemquam commissam cum innoxiis pugnam feliciter exsequi posse.
PF Book V. 137.
 Erik plans response to his discovery of Gøtar's plan to separate him from his wife and marry his sister to him:
Were Gøtar to take the initiative in challenging them, they should pretend to flee for a short while and would thereby have a sounder pretext for battling with him. The hand had every right to resist when the head was endangered.68 Anyone who started a broil with blameless men seldom rejoiced in the consequences.   HED 79:    68Kallstenius (p. 28, no. 68) quotes the Icelandic version: Skylt er hendi af höfði að bera (the hand is bound to protect the head).

O-R Liber quintus. 127. IV. 2. Cumque navigando puppim forte piraticam vadosis ac minus altis gurgitibus inflictam hærere conspiceret, quod res fortuitas dictorum gravitate prosequi solitus erat: "Obscura est," inquit, "ignobilium sors fortunaque vilium sordida."
PF Book V. 141.  Erik comments on the fate of pirate ships:

During the voyage, when he happened to catch sight of a pirate ship run aground in shallow waters, in his usual way he pronounced serious comment on chance circumstances: "The fate of the meaner sort is ignoble, the lot of base individuals squalid."

O-R Liber quintus. 127. IV. 2. Cumque navigando puppim forte piraticam vadosis ac minus altis gurgitibus inflictam hærere conspiceret, quod res fortuitas dictorum gravitate prosequi solitus erat: "Obscura est," inquit, "ignobilium sors fortunaque vilium sordida."
PF Book V. 141.  Erik comments on the fate of pirate ships:

During the voyage, when he happened to catch sight of a pirate ship run aground in shallow waters, in his usual way he pronounced serious comment on chance circumstances: "The fate of the meaner sort is ignoble, the lot of base individuals squalid."

O-R Liber quintus. 127. IV. 4. Interea Strumico Sclavorum rege belli indutias per legatos petente, Frotho tempus apparatui negat, affirmans hostem indutiis instrui non oportere.
PF Book V. 141-2. Frothi's martial policies:

Although Strumik, the Slav king, sent ambassadors to ask for a cessation of hostilities, Frothi refused him time to equip himself; an enemy, he said, should not be supplied with a truce.

O-R Liber quintus. 127. IV. 4. Ericus responsi prudentiam laudat, affirmans ita ludum foris agi oportere, prout domi fuerit inchoatus, Danos a Sclavis provocatos esse significans.
PF Book V. 142.  Erik concurs:
Erik praised the wisdom of his reply, stating that he should play the game abroad as it had begun at home, by which he meant that the Danes had been provoked by the Slavs.

O-R Liber quintus. 128-9. VI. 1. Ad quos Ericus: "Inverecundus," ait, "est latro, qui prior concordiam quærit aut bonis communicare præsumit. Qui enim obtinere gestit, obniti debet; ictus ictui opponendus est livorque livore pellendus." Cumque hoc dictum Gøtarus attentis eminus auribus excepisset, quam poterat clara voce: "Ita", inquit, "quisque virtuti militat, prout beneficii meminit." Cui Ericus: "Beneficentiam tuam reddito tibi consilio repensavi." Quo sermone egregios monitus omni donorum genere præstantiores indicabat.
PF Book V. 144.  Gøtar, fearing Frothi's power, sends envoys asking for peace:

Erik talked to them: "It's a shameless robber who is the first to ask for a truce or ventures to offer one to blameless men. Those who long for possession must struggle for it; blow must be pitted against blow, hatred repel hatred."88 Gøtar listened to his words attentively from a distance and, in as distinct tones as he could muster, replied, "A man's gallantry in action is measured by his recollection of benefits received." Erik answered, "I've requited your generosity with the sound advice I've given you." He meant that excellent counsel was more valuable than any sort of gift, . . .   HED 81:  88Kallstenius (p. 27, no. 61) gives some sayings resembling this. Grettir refers to such a proverb (Grettis Saga 47): 'It is an old saying, that one ill shall be mended by a greater.'

O-R Liber quintus. 128-9. VI. 1. Ad quos Ericus: "Inverecundus," ait, "est latro, qui prior concordiam quærit aut bonis communicare præsumit. Qui enim obtinere gestit, obniti debet; ictus ictui opponendus est livorque livore pellendus." Cumque hoc dictum Gøtarus attentis eminus auribus excepisset, quam poterat clara voce: "Ita", inquit, "quisque virtuti militat, prout beneficii meminit." Cui Ericus: "Beneficentiam tuam reddito tibi consilio repensavi." Quo sermone egregios monitus omni donorum genere præstantiores indicabat.
PF Book V. 144.  Gøtar, fearing Frothi's power, sends envoys asking for peace:

Erik talked to them: "It's a shameless robber who is the first to ask for a truce or ventures to offer one to blameless men. Those who long for possession must struggle for it; blow must be pitted against blow, hatred repel hatred."88 Gøtar listened to his words attentively from a distance and, in as distinct tones as he could muster, replied, "A man's gallantry in action is measured by his recollection of benefits received." Erik answered, "I've requited your generosity with the sound advice I've given you." He meant that excellent counsel was more valuable than any sort of gift, . . .     HED 81:  88Kallstenius (p. 27, no. 61) gives some sayings resembling this. Grettir refers to such a proverb (Grettis Saga 47): 'It is an old saying, that one ill shall be mended by a greater.'

O-R Liber quintus. 128-9. VI. 1. Ad quos Ericus: "Inverecundus," ait, "est latro, qui prior concordiam quærit aut bonis communicare præsumit. Qui enim obtinere gestit, obniti debet; ictus ictui opponendus est livorque livore pellendus." Cumque hoc dictum Gøtarus attentis eminus auribus excepisset, quam poterat clara voce: "Ita", inquit, "quisque virtuti militat, prout beneficii meminit." Cui Ericus: "Beneficentiam tuam reddito tibi consilio repensavi." Quo sermone egregios monitus omni donorum genere præstantiores indicabat.
PF Book V. 144.  Gøtar, fearing Frothi's power, sends envoys asking for peace:

Erik talked to them: "It's a shameless robber who is the first to ask for a truce or ventures to offer one to blameless men. Those who long for possession must struggle for it; blow must be pitted against blow, hatred repel hatred."88 Gøtar listened to his words attentively from a distance and, in as distinct tones as he could muster, replied, "A man's gallantry in action is measured by his recollection of benefits received." Erik answered, "I've requited your generosity with the sound advice I've given you." He meant that excellent counsel was more valuable than any sort of gift, . . .     HED 81:  88Kallstenius (p. 27, no. 61) gives some sayings resembling this. Grettir refers to such a proverb (Grettis Saga 47): 'It is an old saying, that one ill shall be mended by a greater.'

O-R Liber quintus. 128-9. VI. 1. Ad quos Ericus: "Inverecundus," ait, "est latro, qui prior concordiam quærit aut bonis communicare præsumit. Qui enim obtinere gestit, obniti debet; ictus ictui opponendus est livorque livore pellendus." Cumque hoc dictum Gøtarus attentis eminus auribus excepisset, quam poterat clara voce: "Ita", inquit, "quisque virtuti militat, prout beneficii meminit." Cui Ericus: "Beneficentiam tuam reddito tibi consilio repensavi." Quo sermone egregios monitus omni donorum genere præstantiores indicabat.
PF Book V. 144.  Gøtar, fearing Frothi's power, sends envoys asking for peace:

Erik talked to them: "It's a shameless robber who is the first to ask for a truce or ventures to offer one to blameless men. Those who long for possession must struggle for it; blow must be pitted against blow, hatred repel hatred."88 Gøtar listened to his words attentively from a distance and, in as distinct tones as he could muster, replied, "A man's gallantry in action is measured by his recollection of benefits received." Erik answered, "I've requited your generosity with the sound advice I've given you." He meant that excellent counsel was more valuable than any sort of gift, . . .     HED 81:  88Kallstenius (p. 27, no. 61) gives some sayings resembling this. Grettir refers to such a proverb (Grettis Saga 47): 'It is an old saying, that one ill shall be mended by a greater.'

O-R Liber quintus. 128-9. VI. 1. Ad quos Ericus: "Inverecundus," ait, "est latro, qui prior concordiam quærit aut bonis communicare præsumit. Qui enim obtinere gestit, obniti debet; ictus ictui opponendus est livorque livore pellendus." Cumque hoc dictum Gøtarus attentis eminus auribus excepisset, quam poterat clara voce: "Ita", inquit, "quisque virtuti militat, prout beneficii meminit." Cui Ericus: "Beneficentiam tuam reddito tibi consilio repensavi." Quo sermone egregios monitus omni donorum genere præstantiores indicabat.
PF Book V. 144.  Gøtar, fearing Frothi's power, sends envoys asking for peace:

Erik talked to them: "It's a shameless robber who is the first to ask for a truce or ventures to offer one to blameless men. Those who long for possession must struggle for it; blow must be pitted against blow, hatred repel hatred."88 Gøtar listened to his words attentively from a distance and, in as distinct tones as he could muster, replied, "A man's gallantry in action is measured by his recollection of benefits received." Erik answered, "I've requited your generosity with the sound advice I've given you." He meant that excellent counsel was more valuable than any sort of gift, . . .     HED 81:    88Kallstenius (p. 27, no. 61) gives some sayings resembling this. Grettir refers to such a proverb (Grettis Saga 47): 'It is an old saying, that one ill shall be mended by a greater.'

O-R Liber quintus. 129. VII. 2. Ad quem Ericus: "Vincendi invictum subiit spes irrita mentem:/Frothonem nullus exsuperare potest." Contra Olimarus: "Quicquod contingit, primo semel accidit, et res/non sperata satis sæpe subire solet."
PF Book V. 144.  Erik chides Olimar for thinking he could defeat Frothi:

Erik answered, "To allow into your mind hope of conquering the unconquerable/is fruitless. No man can overpower Frothi." Olimar objected: "Every thing that happens has its first occurrence;/events unhoped-for come to pass quite often."90    HED 82:  90Kallstenius (p. 31, no. 88) has the Icelandic phrase Einusinni verður alt fyrst, equivalent to the modern saying: 'There's always a first time for everything.'

O-R Liber quintus. 129. VII. 2. Ad quem Ericus: "Vincendi invictum subiit spes irrita mentem:/Frothonem nullus exsuperare potest." Contra Olimarus: "Quicquod contingit, primo semel accidit, et res/non sperata satis sæpe subire solet."
PF Book V. 144.  Erik chides Olimar for thinking he could defeat Frothi:

Erik answered, "To allow into your mind hope of conquering the unconquerable/is fruitless. No man can overpower Frothi." Olimar objected: "Every thing that happens has its first occurrence;/events unhoped-for come to pass quite often."90    HED 82:  90Kallstenius (p. 31, no. 88) has the Icelandic phrase Einusinni verður alt fyrst, equivalent to the modern saying: 'There's always a first time for everything.'

O-R Liber quintus. 129. VII. 2. Ad quem Ericus: "Vincendi invictum subiit spes irrita mentem:/Frothonem nullus exsuperare potest." Contra Olimarus: "Quicquod contingit, primo semel accidit, et res/non sperata satis sæpe subire solet."
PF Book V. 144.  Erik chides Olimar for thinking he could defeat Frothi:

Erik answered, "To allow into your mind hope of conquering the unconquerable/is fruitless. No man can overpower Frothi." Olimar objected: "Every thing that happens has its first occurrence;/events unhoped-for come to pass quite often."90    HED 82:  90Kallstenius (p. 31, no. 88) has the Icelandic phrase Einusinni verður alt fyrst, equivalent to the modern saying: 'There's always a first time for everything.'

O-R Liber quintus. 129. VII. 2. Ad quem Ericus: "Vincendi invictum subiit spes irrita mentem:/Frothonem nullus exsuperare potest." Contra Olimarus: "Quicquod contingit, primo semel accidit, et res/non sperata satis sæpe subire solet."
PF Book V. 144.  Erik chides Olimar for thinking he could defeat Frothi:

Erik answered, "To allow into your mind hope of conquering the unconquerable/is fruitless. No man can overpower Frothi." Olimar objected: "Every thing that happens has its first occurrence;/events unhoped-for come to pass quite often."90    HED 82:  90Kallstenius (p. 31, no. 88) has the Icelandic phrase Einusinni verður alt fyrst, equivalent to the modern saying: 'There's always a first time for everything.'

O-R Liber quintus. 129-30. VII. 3. Cui Ericus: "Numquam Frotho domi inimicum præstolatur exercitum nec hostem inn ædibus opperitur. Pernox enim et pervigil esse debet alienum appetens culmen. Nemo stertendo victoriam cepit, nec luporum quisquam cubando cadaver invenit." Quem rex exquisitis dictorum sententiis callere cognoscens: "Hic," ait, "fortasse Ericus est, a quo filiam meam falsi criminis insimulatam accepi." Qui continuo prendi iussus, non decere inquit unum a pluribus abripi.
PF Book V. 145.  Hun, the Hunnish king, recognizes Erik by his eloquence:

"Frothi never waits at home, lingering in his halls, for a hostile army. Whoever intends to scale another's pinnacle must be watchful and wakeful. Nobody has ever won victory by snoring, nor has any sleeping wolf found a carcase."93  The king recognised his intelligence from these carefully chosen apothegms and reflected, "Here perhaps is the Erik who, so I've heard, laid a false charge against my daughter." He gave orders for him to be pinioned at once, but Erik pointed out how unsuitable it was for one creature to be manhandled by many.94     HED 82:   93Similar proverbial sayings are found in Hávamál 58: 'A man should get up early if he wants to take the life or wealth of another; the wolf snug in his lair never gets a bite at the leg, nor does the sleeping man gain a victory.' Kallstenius (p. 30, no. 79) also refers to a Danish proverb: Siællen kommer ligghende wlff lam in mwnnæ. (The wolf who lies down is not likely to get a lamb in his jaws).   94This appears to be a recognised proverb or maxim (see note 39 above), and this may be why the king is so impressed by Erik's words. There is a similar reaction in The Battle of the Goths and Huns, when the command to seize Gizur, the messenger of Angangyr, is countermanded by King Humli with the words: "We must not do harm to heralds who travel alone' (28).

O-R Liber quintus. 129-30. VII. 3. Cui Ericus: "Numquam Frotho domi inimicum præstolatur exercitum nec hostem inn ædibus opperitur. Pernox enim et pervigil esse debet alienum appetens culmen. Nemo stertendo victoriam cepit, nec luporum quisquam cubando cadaver invenit." Quem rex exquisitis dictorum sententiis callere cognoscens: "Hic," ait, "fortasse Ericus est, a quo filiam meam falsi criminis insimulatam accepi." Qui continuo prendi iussus, non decere inquit unum a pluribus abripi.
PF Book V. 145.  Hun, the Hunnish king, recognizes Erik by his eloquence:

"Frothi never waits at home, lingering in his halls, for a hostile army. Whoever intends to scale another's pinnacle must be watchful and wakeful. Nobody has ever won victory by snoring, nor has any sleeping wolf found a carcase."93 The king recognised his intelligence from these carefully chosen apothegms and reflected, "Here perhaps is the Erik who, so I've heard, laid a false charge against my daughter." He gave orders for him to be pinioned at once, but Erik pointed out how unsuitable it was for one creature to be manhandled by many.94     HED 82:   93Similar proverbial sayings are found in Hávamál 58: 'A man should get up early if he wants to take the life or wealth of another; the wolf snug in his lair never gets a bite at the leg, nor does the sleeping man gain a victory.' Kallstenius (p. 30, no. 79) also refers to a Danish proverb: Siællen kommer ligghende wlff lam in mwnnæ. (The wolf who lies down is not likely to get a lamb in his jaws).      942This appears to be a recognised proverb or maxim (see note 39 above), and this may be why the king is so impressed by Erik's words. There is a similar reaction in The Battle of the Goths and Huns, when the command to seize Gizur, the messenger of Angangyr, is countermanded by King Humli with the words: "We must not do harm to heralds who travel alone' (28).
TPMA 10. 103. SCHLAFEN/dormir/to sleep 7. Negative Folgen des (übermässigen) Schlafens 7.1. Schlafen führt zur Sünde Nord. 88 Ofsvefni tæla Lát þik aldrigi, Kosta vakr at vera; Leti ok lasta Verðr þeim er lengi sefr Auðit iðuliga  Lass dich nie von übermässigen Schlaf verlocken! Bemühe dich, wach zu sein! Oft befallen Faulheit und Laster denjenigen, der lange schläft HUGSVINNSMÁL 18, 1.
TPMA 10. 105. SCHLAFEN/dormir/to sleep 7. Negative Folgen des (übermässigen) Schlafens 7.12. Verschiedenes Nord. 116, 117 Fátt veit sá er sefr Wenig weiss, wer schläft HARALDS SAGA HARÐRÁÐA 26 (→ FMS VI, 201). MORKINSKINNA 36, 28 (= JÓNSSON, ARKIV 461. jÓNSSON 184) (vgl. WISSEN 11).
Ed. note.  See Hávamál: 58 Ár scal rísa,/ sá er annars vill/fé eða fiör hafa;/sialdan liggiandi úlfr/lær um getr,/né sofandi maðr sigr.  59 Ár scal rísa,/ sá er á yrkendr fá,/oc ganga síns verca á vit;/ mart um dvelr,/ þann er um morgin sefr,/ hálfr er auðr und hvötum.   Larrington: He should get up early, the man who means to take/ another´s life or property;/the slumbering wolf does not get the ham,/nor a sleeping man victory.  59. He should get up early, the man who has few workers,/and go about his work with thought;/ much he neglects, the man who sleeps in in the mornings,/ wealth is half-won by the vigorous.

O-R Liber quintus. 129-30. VII. 3. Cui Ericus: "Numquam Frotho domi inimicum præstolatur exercitum nec hostem inn ædibus opperitur. Pernox enim et pervigil esse debet alienum appetens culmen. Nemo stertendo victoriam cepit, nec luporum quisquam cubando cadaver invenit." Quem rex exquisitis dictorum sententiis callere cognoscens: "Hic," ait, "fortasse Ericus est, a quo filiam meam falsi criminis insimulatam accepi." Qui continuo prendi iussus, non decere inquit unum a pluribus abripi.
PF Book V. 145.  Hun, the Hunnish king, recognizes Erik by his eloquence:

"Frothi never waits at home, lingering in his halls, for a hostile army. Whoever intends to scale another's pinnacle must be watchful and wakeful. Nobody has ever won victory by snoring, nor has any sleeping wolf found a carcase."93 The king recognised his intelligence from these carefully chosen apothegms and reflected, "Here perhaps is the Erik who, so I've heard, laid a false charge against my daughter." He gave orders for him to be pinioned at once, but Erik pointed out how unsuitable it was for one creature to be manhandled by many.94     HED 82:   93Similar proverbial sayings are found in Hávamál 58: 'A man should get up early if he wants to take the life or wealth of another; the wolf snug in his lair never gets a bite at the leg, nor does the sleeping man gain a victory.' Kallstenius (p. 30, no. 79) also refers to a Danish proverb: Siællen kommer ligghende wlff lam in mwnnæ. (The wolf who lies down is not likely to get a lamb in his jaws).      94This appears to be a recognised proverb or maxim (see note 39 above), and this may be why the king is so impressed by Erik's words. There is a similar reaction in The Battle of the Goths and Huns, when the command to seize Gizur, the messenger of Angangyr, is countermanded by King Humli with the words: "We must not do harm to heralds who travel alone' (28).

O-R Liber quintus. 129-30. VII. 3. Cui Ericus: "Numquam Frotho domi inimicum præstolatur exercitum nec hostem inn ædibus opperitur. Pernox enim et pervigil esse debet alienum appetens culmen. Nemo stertendo victoriam cepit, nec luporum quisquam cubando cadaver invenit." Quem rex exquisitis dictorum sententiis callere cognoscens: "Hic," ait, "fortasse Ericus est, a quo filiam meam falsi criminis insimulatam accepi." Qui continuo prendi iussus, non decere inquit unum a pluribus abripi.
PF Book V. 145.  Hun, the Hunnish king, recognizes Erik by his eloquence:

"Frothi never waits at home, lingering in his halls, for a hostile army. Whoever intends to scale another's pinnacle must be watchful and wakeful. Nobody has ever won victory by snoring, nor has any sleeping wolf found a carcase." 93 The king recognised his intelligence from these carefully chosen apothegms and reflected, "Here perhaps is the Erik who, so I've heard, laid a false charge against my daughter." He gave orders for him to be pinioned at once, but Erik pointed out how unsuitable it was for one creature to be manhandled by many.94     HED 82:   93Similar proverbial sayings are found in Hávamál 58: 'A man should get up early if he wants to take the life or wealth of another; the wolf snug in his lair never gets a bite at the leg, nor does the sleeping man gain a victory.' Kallstenius (p. 30, no. 79) also refers to a Danish proverb: Siællen kommer ligghende wlff lam in mwnnæ. (The wolf who lies down is not likely to get a lamb in his jaws).      94This appears to be a recognised proverb or maxim (see note 39 above), and this may be why the king is so impressed by Erik's words. There is a similar reaction in The Battle of the Goths and Huns, when the command to seize Gizur, the messenger of Angangyr, is countermanded by King Humli with the words: "We must not do harm to heralds who travel alone' (28).

O-R Liber quintus. 130. VII. 4. Cunctante vero Frothone, quid contra tot acturus esset, attentiusque subsidia circumspiciente: "Probum," inquit Ericus, "audacia iuvat; acri cane occupandus est ursus; molossis quippe, non imbellibus caniculis opus est."
PF Book V. 145.  Erik, returned to Frothi, advises him to proceed against the Hunnish hordes:

But while Frothi was hesitating over how he should combat these immense levies and was looking about purposefully for reinforcements, Erik said: "Boldness helps the virtuous; it takes a fierce hound to set upon a bear; we need mastiffs, not lap-dogs."

O-R Liber quintus. 130. VII. 4. Cunctante vero Frothone, quid contra tot acturus esset, attentiusque subsidia circumspiciente: "Probum," inquit Ericus, "audacia iuvat; acri cane occupandus est ursus; molossis quippe, non imbellibus caniculis opus est."
PF Book V. 145.  Erik, returned to Frothi, advises him to proceed against the Hunnish hordes:

But while Frothi was hesitating over how he should combat these immense levies and was looking about purposefully for reinforcements, Erik said: "Boldness helps the virtuous; it takes a fierce hound to set upon a bear; we need mastiffs, not lap-dogs."

O-R Liber quintus. 130. VII. 4. Cunctante vero Frothone, quid contra tot acturus esset, attentiusque subsidia circumspiciente: "Probum," inquit Ericus, "audacia iuvat; acri cane occupandus est ursus; molossis quippe, non imbellibus caniculis opus est."
PF Book V. 145.  Erik, returned to Frothi, advises him to proceed against the Hunnish hordes:

But while Frothi was hesitating over how he should combat these immense levies and was looking about purposefully for reinforcements, Erik said: "Boldness helps the virtuous; it takes a fierce hound to set upon a bear; we need mastiffs, not lap-dogs."

O-R Liber quintus. 130. VII. 4. Quarum cum Frotho paucitatem incessere deforme duxisset: "A macro," inquit Ericus, "et tenui petendus est cibus. Raro pinguescet qui cadit; neque enim mordendi potens est, quem vastus occupaverit follis." Quo documento regi irruptionis edendæ ruborem excussit eumque mox ad paucitatem multitudine lacessendam perduxit, utilitatem pudori præferendam significans.
PF Book V. 145.  When Frothi hesitates to attack the Rutenians, who have such a small fleet, Eric advises:
"We must seek our food among the lean and slender; one who falls will rarely grow fat; if he has a great sack thrown over his head, he won't be able to bite."96  This argument shook the king out of his shame, and he was led to assault the few vessels with his own multitude, showing he must set profitability higher than propriety.    HED 83:   96Kallstenius (p. 21, no. 20) gives an Icelandic equivalent for the first saying: Af mögru skal mat hafa (food shall be had from the lean); and again for the second (p. 25, no. 47): Sjaldan fitnar hinn fallni (The fallen seldom grows fat); and the third (p. 28, no. 69): Ekki bítur sá í belg liggur (What's in the bag can't bite).

O-R Liber quintus. 130. VII. 4. Quarum cum Frotho paucitatem incessere deforme duxisset: "A macro," inquit Ericus, "et tenui petendus est cibus. Raro pinguescet qui cadit; neque enim mordendi potens est, quem vastus occupaverit follis." Quo documento regi irruptionis edendæ ruborem excussit eumque mox ad paucitatem multitudine lacessendam perduxit, utilitatem pudori præferendam significans.
PF Book V. 145.  When Frothi hesitates to attack the Rutenians, who have such a small fleet, Eric advises:
"We must seek our food among the lean and slender; one who falls will rarely grow fat; if he has a great sack thrown over his head, he won't be able to bite."96 This argument shook the king out of his shame, and he was led to assault the few vessels with his own multitude, showing he must set profitability higher than propriety.    HED 83:   96Kallstenius (p. 21, no. 20) gives an Icelandic equivalent for the first saying: Af mögru skal mat hafa (food shall be had from the lean); and again for the second (p. 25, no. 47): Sjaldan fitnar hinn fallni (The fallen seldom grows fat); and the third (p. 28, no. 69): Ekki bítur sá í belg liggur (What's in the bag can't bite).
Gering 18. fitna. – 34. sjalðan fitnar enn fallni. 'der tote wird nicht mehr fett'.  Nur neuisl¨nd. belegt (Müller zu Saxo 23323), aber als alt erwiesen durch Saxos übersetzung: raro pinguescet qui cadit.

O-R Liber quintus. 130. VII. 4. Quarum cum Frotho paucitatem incessere deforme duxisset: "A macro," inquit Ericus, "et tenui petendus est cibus. Raro pinguescet qui cadit; neque enim mordendi potens est, quem vastus occupaverit follis." Quo documento regi irruptionis edendæ ruborem excussit eumque mox ad paucitatem multitudine lacessendam perduxit, utilitatem pudori præferendam significans.
PF Book V. 145.  When Frothi hesitates to attack the Rutenians, who have such a small fleet, Eric advises:
"We must seek our food among the lean and slender; one who falls will rarely grow fat; if he has a great sack thrown over his head, he won't be able to bite."96 This argument shook the king out of his shame, and he was led to assault the few vessels with his own multitude, showing he must set profitability higher than propriety.    HED 83:   96Kallstenius (p. 21, no. 20) gives an Icelandic equivalent for the first saying: Af mögru skal mat hafa (food shall be had from the lean); and again for the second (p. 25, no. 47): Sjaldan fitnar hinn fallni (The fallen seldom grows fat); and the third (p. 28, no. 69): Ekki bítur sá í belg liggur (What's in the bag can't bite).
Gering 15 bíta. – 6. ekki bítr þat er í belg leggr. Das sprichwort ('was man in den sack steckt, kann nicht beissen') ist nur neuisländisch belegt (Guðm. Jónsson 6429; Müller zu Saxo 2341), aber sein alter bezeugt Saxos übersetzung: neque enim mordendi potens est, quem vastus occupaverit follis.

O-R Liber quintus. 130. VII. 4. Quarum cum Frotho paucitatem incessere deforme duxisset: "A macro," inquit Ericus, "et tenui petendus est cibus. Raro pinguescet qui cadit; neque enim mordendi potens est, quem vastus occupaverit follis." Quo documento regi irruptionis edendæ ruborem excussit eumque mox ad paucitatem multitudine lacessendam perduxit, utilitatem pudori præferendam significans.
PF Book V. 145.  When Frothi hesitates to attack the Rutenians, who have such a small fleet, Eric advises:
"We must seek our food among the lean and slender; one who falls will rarely grow fat; if he has a great sack thrown over his head, he won't be able to bite."96 This argument shook the king out of his shame, and he was led to assault the few vessels with his own multitude, showing he must set profitability higher than propriety.    HED 83:   96Kallstenius (p. 21, no. 20) gives an Icelandic equivalent for the first saying: Af mögru skal mat hafa (food shall be had from the lean); and again for the second (p. 25, no. 47): Sjaldan fitnar hinn fallni (The fallen seldom grows fat); and the third (p. 28, no. 69): Ekki bítur sá í belg liggur (What's in the bag can't bite).

O-R Liber quintus. 131. VII. 7.   . . . nefas omne morientibus licitum fuit. Nihil enim tam difficile, quod necessitas suprema non imperet. Ad ultimam fame exhaustis publica claders incessit: efferebantur absque cessatione corpora, cunctisque exitium formidantibus, nulli miseratio pereuntium fuit; humanitatem quippe metus excluserat.
PF Book V. 146.  The Huns are defeated by the size of their army, unable to feed itself:
The dying men condoned every monstrosity, for nothing is so unthinkable that it cannot be enforced by dire need. In the end wholesale disaster assailed them, spent as they were with hunger; corpses were carried to burial ceaselessly, and though everyone dreaded death no pity was felt for those who were expiring. Fear had shut out all humanity.

O-R Liber quintus. 131. VII. 7.   . . . nefas omne morientibus licitum fuit. Nihil enim tam difficile, quod necessitas suprema non imperet. Ad ultimam fame exhaustis publica claders incessit: efferebantur absque cessatione corpora, cunctisque exitium formidantibus, nulli miseratio pereuntium fuit; humanitatem quippe metus excluserat.
PF Book V. 146.  The Huns are defeated by the size of their army, unable to feed itself:
The dying men condoned every monstrosity, for nothing is so unthinkable that it cannot be enforced by dire need. In the end wholesale disaster assailed them, spent as they were with hunger; corpses were carried to burial ceaselessly, and though everyone dreaded death no pity was felt for those who were expiring. Fear had shut out all humanity.

O-R Liber quintus. 131. VII. 7.   . . . nefas omne morientibus licitum fuit. Nihil enim tam difficile, quod necessitas suprema non imperet. Ad ultimam fame exhaustis publica claders incessit: efferebantur absque cessatione corpora, cunctisque exitium formidantibus, nulli miseratio pereuntium fuit; humanitatem quippe metus excluserat.
PF Book V. 146.  The Huns are defeated by the size of their army, unable to feed itself:
The dying men condoned every monstrosity, for nothing is so unthinkable that it cannot be enforced by dire need. In the end wholesale disaster assailed them, spent as they were with hunger; corpses were carried to burial ceaselessly, and though everyone dreaded death no pity was felt for those who were expiring. Fear had shut out all humanity.

O-R Liber quintus. 134. X. 1. Cumque militiæ procursum in Alricum effundere statuisset, Ericus prius filium eius Gunthiovum, Wermis ac Soloringis prælatum, censuit impetendum, oportere asserens fessum tempestate nautam proximum captare litus. Præterea radicum inopem raro virere truncum.
PF Book V. 149.  Gestiblind, King of Götaland, wants to attack Alrik, King of Sweden, but Erik persuades him to attack Alrik's son, Gunthiof, first:

Though Gestiblind had determined to launch an invasion on Alrik, Erik proposed that he first attack the son, Gunthiof, leader of the men of Värmland and Solör, declaring that the sailor wearied by the storm should make for the nearest shore; besides, a tree without roots rarely grew verdant.

O-R Liber quintus. 134. X. 1. Cumque militiæ procursum in Alricum effundere statuisset, Ericus prius filium eius Gunthiovum, Wermis ac Soloringis prælatum, censuit impetendum, oportere asserens fessum tempestate nautam proximum captare litus. Præterea radicum inopem raro virere truncum.
PF Book V. 149.  Gestiblind, King of Götaland, wants to attack Alrik, King of Sweden, but Erik persuades him to attack Alrik's son, Gunthiof, first:

Though Gestiblind had determined to launch an invasion on Alrik, Erik proposed that he first attack the son, Gunthiof, leader of the men of Värmland and Solör, declaring that the sailor wearied by the storm should make for the nearest shore; besides, a tree without roots rarely grew verdant.

O-R Liber quintus. 135. XI. 2. Humanæ siquidem cupiditatis more, quo plura possederat, plus affectans, etiam vastissimam atque horridissimam orbis terrarum partem ab hoc iniuriæ genere intentatam exsistere passus non est. Adeo opum accessio aviditati incrementum afferre consuevit.
PF Book V. 150.  Frothi sails to Norway, and Erik leads a detachment overland:

It was the usual tale of human avarice, the more he possessed, the more he wanted;129 he would not leave even this bleak and forbidding quarter of the world unmolested. The acquisition of wealth has never failed to increase men's greed.     HED 88:  129Kallstenius (p. 21, no. 22) quotes the Danish form of this proverb: Meer vil meer, equivalent to the English 'Much will have more'.

O-R Liber quintus. 135. XI. 2. Humanæ siquidem cupiditatis more, quo plura possederat, plus affectans, etiam vastissimam atque horridissimam orbis terrarum partem ab hoc iniuriæ genere intentatam exsistere passus non est. Adeo opum accessio aviditati incrementum afferre consuevit.
PF Book V. 150.  Frothi sails to Norway, and Erik leads a detachment overland:

It was the usual tale of human avarice, the more he possessed, the more he wanted;129 he would not leave even this bleak and forbidding quarter of the world unmolested. The acquisition of wealth has never failed to increase men's greed.     HED 88:  129Kallstenius (p. 21, no. 22) quotes the Danish form of this proverb: Meer vil meer, equivalent to the English 'Much will have more'.

O-R Liber quintus. 136. XI. 4. Mala soli, gravis uni manet omnis domus orbis;/miseri quos hominum subsidiis destituit fors.
PF Book V. 151.  When Asmund is lifted from the tomb he responds when bystanders ask him how he was wounded:

Every dwelling in the world is wretched for one in loneliness;/unhappy are they whom Fate has robbed of the help of men.

O-R Liber quintus. 136. XI. 4. Mala soli, gravis uni manet omnis domus orbis;/miseri quos hominum subsidiis destituit fors.
PF Book V. 151.  When Asmund is lifted from the tomb he responds when bystanders ask him how he was wounded:

Every dwelling in the world is wretched for one in loneliness;/unhappy are they whom Fate has robbed of the help of men.

 

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