In print


Dream No Little Dreams: A Biography of the Douglas Government of Saskatchewan, 1944-1961

Dream No Little Dreams: A Biography of the Douglas Government of Saskatchewan, 1944-1961 (University of Toronto Press, 2004) by A.W. Johnson, BA'42, with the assistance of Rosemary Proctor � Dream No Little Dreams is the biography of the first socialist government in North America, led by the great Tommy Douglas of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF, later the New Democratic Party). It is a history of the life of the CCF and a case study in the art and practice of governing; partly a study in the policy decisions of the government, and partly an insider's view.


A Richer Dust: Family, Memory and the Second World War

A Richer Dust: Family, Memory and the Second World War (Viking Canada, 2004) by Robert Calder, BA'63, MA'65 - A Richer Dust is an exploration of the profound effects of war after the war is over. Robert Calder uses his Uncle Ken's wartime journal and letters, as well as newspaper accounts and military memories, to vividly recreate the horrendous battlefield conditions in Italy and Holland.


Eyehill

Eyehill (Goose Lane, 2004) by Kelly Cooper, BEd'85 - Eyehill, Kelly Cooper's debut collection of loosely-linked stories, provides a multi-hued portrait of a small prairie town. Too small to support a high school or a drugstore, Eyehill is populated by men and women who have worked for generations to wrest a living from the dry, rolling hills.


Jacob's Wound: A Search for the Spirit of Wildness

Jacob's Wound: A Search for the Spirit of Wildness (McClelland & Stewart, 2004) by Trevor Herriot, BA'80 - The Genesis story of Jacob, the patriarch of the Judeo-Christian tradition, wrestling with a spirit has been interpreted in a multitude of ways, but never more persuasively than by Trevor Herriot in Jacob's Wound. Jacob's Wound takes readers on a journey through history, memoir, science, and theology. Along the way, Herriot tells us stories of the past and present that illuminate what we once were and what we have become.


Prairie People: A Celebration of My Homeland

Prairie People: A Celebration of My Homeland (McClelland & Stewart Ltd, 2003) by Robert Collins, C/Arts'48 - Prairie People is an absorbing combination of stories, anecdotes, and touches of history told in the voices of ordinary people and linked by the author's own narrative and memories. In this sympathetic yet realistic portrait, Collins looks at where the original settlers of the prairies came from. He describes how nature shaped them, and how hard work through good times and bad toughened them. While seeking to understand their unifying distrust of "Central Canada," Collins finds evidence of their legendary friendliness and neighbourliness.