About The Buffalo History Conference

In 1904, Sir Frederick Haultain, the Northwest Territories’ first and only premier, had a dream: to unite the prairie region into a single province called Buffalo.  Saskatchewan's "forgotten father of Confederation," Haultain promoted the creation of a single united prairie province as an effective non-partisan means for the region to enter Canadian federalism.¹  "One big Province," he argued, "would be able to do things no other province could."²

Building on that dream a century later, the Buffalo Province History Conference seeks to bring together graduate students and faculty from Canada’s prairie universities.  This conference offers a collegial and cordial environment for students in all programs of study to share their work, meet potential future advisors and colleagues, and engage a wide range of historical topics. 

The conference takes place over three days every spring in a centrally located venue in the heart of Haultain's Buffalo Province.  The call for papers is advertised every winter.  Presentations on all historical topics are welcome.  The event is organized, funded, and hosted by the University of Saskatchewan Department of History.

 

 

 

¹ Bill Waiser, Saskatchewan: A New History (Calgary: Fifth House Ltd., 2005), 4-6, 96.

² Quoted in D. Owram, ed., The Formation of Alberta: A Documentary History (Calgary: Alberta Records Publication Board, 1979), 115.

* Watermark image source: Waiser, Saskatchewan: A New History , 6.  Used with permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Watermark image source: Bill Waiser, Saskatchewan: A New History (Calgary: Fifth House Ltd., 2005), 6.  Used with permission of the author.

 

 

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