Blocked Attachments

In order to limit the possibility of viruses being spread by email, we block certain attachments. This helps address the delay between a new virus appearing and conventional anti-virus software being able to detect it. The file types currently blocked are those with any of the following extensions:

Blocked Attachments:
ADE ADP ASX                
BAS BAT                  
CHM CMD COM CPL CRT            
DOCM                    
EXE                    
HTA HLP                  
INF INS ISP                
JS JSE                  
LNK                    
MDA MDB MDE MDL MDT MDW MDZ MSC MSI MSP MST
Microsoft Office XML Containing Macros Microsoft Word 2007 Onwards Containing Macros Microsoft Excel Containing Macros Microsoft Word Containing Macros              
OPS                    
PCD PIF PRF                
REG                    
SCF SCR SCT SHB SHS            
URL                    
VB VBE VBS                
WSC WSF WSH                
ZIP files containing any blocked attachments                    
XLSM                    

If an email with a banned attachment type comes into the university from an external source, the attachment will be replaced by a warning message and the email forwarded to the recipient. No warning is passed back to the sender.

Sending and Receiving Blocked Attachments

Where you have a genuine need to send or receive a program or document that is being blocked we recommend that it be shared using our owncloud service

Attachment File Extensions

Attackers have attached viruses with seemingly harmless filenames to email messages. Some computers are configured by default to hide filename extensions and attackers will try to take advantage of this and mask the .exe file by giving it a fake extension to make an executable file look like a simple document or text file. If your file extensions are hidden you would see only "filename.txt" or "filename.doc" and could mistake it for a harmless file. With the ability to see file extension, the file would read "filename.txt.exe" or "filename.doc.exe." Attackers may even deceive you by having the virus behave as you would expect, while it is really attacking your computer. To help avoid this, make sure that your computer shows all file extensions.

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