Submitting a Proposal

Native Law Centre Publishing

            … furthering learning, knowledge, and research in Aboriginal law

The Native Law Centre publishes the Canadian Native Law Reporter—Canada’s only case law report series on Aboriginal law; the First Nations Gazette—the authoritative reference for First Nations laws in Canada; and Justice as Healing—a restorative justice newsletter.

Our monographs and books are written by both established and emerging academics and legal practitioners.

Across the whole range of our publishing, we are committed to producing high-quality legal resources that give meaningful insight into topics and issues in Aboriginal law.

We welcome submissions of original works in the subject area of Aboriginal law that are research-based, analytical in nature, and incisive in interpretation of trends in Aboriginal law and of where the law is headed.

Submitting a proposal

We ask prospective authors to submit proposals, rather than entire manuscripts, for initial consideration. The proposal should include:

  • a letter outlining the rationale for writing the book, the focus of the work, your sense of the potential audience for the work, and the extent of the manuscript in word count, including any preliminary and endmatter such as preface, appendices, and bibliography
  • an annotated table of contents
  • the introduction
  • a sample chapter
  • samples and an estimate of the total number of any non-text materials such as maps and tables to be included in the final manuscript
  • your curriculum vitae

If the proposal is of interest to us, we will ask you to submit two copies of the complete manuscript, which will be reviewed by specialists in the field. If we accept the manuscript for publication, an agreement to publish, which sets out the responsibilities of both the publisher and the author, may be offered. The author retains the copyright to the work.

Preparing the Manuscript

The manuscript should include:

  • title page
  • table of contents
  • introduction or preface
  • main text and footnotes
  • copies/drafts of any non-text materials
  • any other ancillary materials, such as bibliography, table of cases, appendices.

The manuscript must be set in a standard typeface and type size, double-spaced on 8½” x 11″ paper, with generous margins (1½” on all sides of text). Pages should be numbered consecutively. Provide unjustified text, inactivate auto-hyphenation, and ensure that heading levels are immediately apparent. Footnotes, not endnotes, should be used. Spelling should conform to the Canadian Oxford Dictionary. For style and formatting rules please consult the Canadian Guide to Uniform Legal Citation and the Chicago Manual of Style.

After acceptance of the manuscript, you will be asked to provide an electronic version of the manuscript in Microsoft Word format.

Publishing Process

     Editing and Proofing

We will edit the manuscript for content, structure, style, and consistency. Depending on the nature and extent of the revisions, we may be in contact with you during the editorial process. The edited manuscript will be sent to you for revisions and approval of the suggested changes. Once the revisions are satisfactorily completed, page proofs will be prepared and forwarded to you for proofreading and approval. Editorial staff will also proofread these pages.

     Index

Compiling the index is the author’s responsibility. The index is the last part of the manuscript to be prepared and cannot be completed until the manuscript text is set into page proofs. From the page proofs you will be able to add the appropriate page numbers to the index entries.

     Design

All matters of design, such as page layout, typography, runningheads, paper stock, and cover, are the responsibility of the publisher, but we will consult with you on design elements.

     Marketing

Our market is diverse and includes, but is not limited to, libraries, scholars, academic institutions, lawyers, judges, policy advisors, First Nations institutions, and all levels of government. Methods of promotion may include direct marketing, brochures, display copies, review copies, and submission of data to bibliographic databases used by librarians and other buyers when selecting titles.