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Aboriginal Health &
Cultural Diversity Glossary

F – Definitions

family:

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family “Aboriginal”:
“To Aboriginal people, family signifies the biological unit of parents and children living together in a household, but it also has a much broader meaning. Family also encompasses an extended network of grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins” (RCAP, Volume III, page 11-12).

family “Aboriginal”:
“The term "family" has different meanings for different people. The meaning varies as the principles, values and traditions of the people vary. For Aboriginal people, the family may include moms, dads and children living at home or it may be extended to include grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, cousins and significant others. The extended family may live at home or in the community. What is most important about the family is that we care for, trust and respect each other. That is the traditional Aboriginal way of life” (Health Canada, 2003).

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family “blended”:
“Stepfamily, joining of family units in a partnership and blended relationship of children” (Dictionary.com, 2003).

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family “extended”:
“A family group that consists of parents, children, and other close relatives, often living in close proximity” (Dictionary.com, 2003).

family “extended”:
“A group of relatives, such as those of three generations, who live in close geographic proximity rather than under the same roof” (Dictionary.com, 2003).

family “extended”:
“A family consisting of the nuclear family and their blood relatives” (Dictionary.com, 2003).

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family “multigenerational”:
“Of or relating to several generations: multigenerational family traditions”
(Dictionary.com, 2003).
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family “nuclear”:
“A family unit consisting of a mother and father and their children” (Dictionary.com, 2003).

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family of origin:
“Family lineage, origin, parentage, related by blood” (Dictionary.com, 2003).

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family “single parent”:
“Family unit consisting of one parent and her/his children” (Dictionary.com, 2003).
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family “step”:
“Family unit living in a household, blended family not blood related” (Dictionary.com, 2003).
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family "two generational":

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family violence:
“ Family violence to Aboriginal people is the general term for this loss of balance in their environment” (Health Canada, 2003).

family violence:
" Family violence" is a general term most often used to describe abuse in terms of the family. This violence is usually talked about as child abuse, wife abuse, elder abuse, abuse of people with disabilities and Aboriginal family violence” (Health Canada, 2003).

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Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE):
"Possible fetal alcohol effects" (FAE) indicates that alcohol is being considered as one of the possible causes of a child's birth defects.1 This term is used to describe children with prenatal exposure to alcohol, but only some FAS characteristics. These may include reduced or delayed growth of the baby, single birth defects or developmental learning and behavioural disorders that may not be noticed until months or years after the child's birth” (AASE, 1994; as cited in Canadian Nurses Association, 1996).

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS):
“Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, or FAS, is a medical diagnosis that refers to a set of alcohol-related disabilities associated with the use of alcohol during pregnancy. The minimum criteria for diagnosing a child with FAS” (Canadian Nurses Association, 1996).

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS):
“Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a medically diagnosable disability describing a set of birth defects caused by using alcohol during pregnancy. There is no cure for FAS, but it is 100 per cent preventable” (Turtle Island Native Network, 2003).

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS & FAE):
“The Fetal alcohol syndrome is defined by marked growth deficiencies (prenatal and/or postnatal growth retardation with weight and/or length below the 10th percentile), central nervous system involvement (including neurological abnormalities, developmental delays, behavioural dysfunction, intellectual impairment, and skull or brain malformations) and a characteristic face (with short palpebral fissures (eye openings), a thin upper lip, and an elongated, flattened mid face and philtrum (the groove in the middle of the upper lip) (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1991; as cited in Ashley, 1992). When some, but not all of these abnormalities are found and prenatal alcohol use is being considered as a possible cause, the term "possible fetal alcohol effect(s)" (FAE) may be used. It is now recognized that FAS and FAE are life-long disorders, progressing predictably into adolescence and adulthood” (Steissguth, Aase, Clarren, Randels, LaDue, & Smith, 1991, as cited in Ashley, 1992).

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS & FAE):
“FAS and FAE are birth defects caused by the consumption of alcohol during pregnancy and while nursing. FAS/FAE is a nation-wide health concern, and it does not discriminate on the basis of race, socioeconomic status, or sex” (Health Canada, 2003).

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Fine-Day:
(Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 106-108).
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First Nation:
“A term that came into common usage in the 1970s to replace the word "Indian," which many people found offensive. Although the term First Nation is widely used, no legal definition of it exists. Among its uses, the term "First Nations peoples" refers to the Indian people in Canada, both Status and Non-Status. Many Indian people have also adopted the term “First Nation” to replace the word "band" in the name of their community” (Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, 2000).

First Nations:
“The term ‘First Nations’ replaces the term ‘Indian’” (Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, 1996, as cited in Browne & Smye, 2002).

First Nations:
“ In Canada, “Indian people identify themselves as First Nation people. It is acknowledged that First Nation people have a special relationship with the federal government by virtue of the Treaties. “The Constitution Act of 1982 defines Aboriginal people as including Indian, Métis and Inuit people” (Alberta Justice, 2002).

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First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB), 2000:
“The First Nations and Inuit Health Branch is a highly decentralized, client-oriented organization which is responsible for providing health services to status Indians living on-reserve and to recognized Inuit and Innu people. The Medical Services Branch formed in 1962, was renamed the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch in 2000” (Health Canada, 2003).

First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB), 2000:
“Government branch where all Aboriginal people who have status will be registered in a central database”

First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB), 2000:
“First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) is responsible for the delivery of primary health services in First Nations ‘on-reserve’ communities” (Tuberculosis in First Nations Communities, 1999, Health Canada, 2003).

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First Nations University of Canada (FNUC) 2003:
“On June 21, 2003, the Saskatchewan Indian Federated College, SIFC originating in 1976, became the First Nations University of Canada” (Saskatchewan Indian Federated College, 2003), and the first Aboriginal University in the world.

First Nations University of Canada (FNUC) 2003:
“When SIFC opened its doors, in 1976, there were less than 10 students at the College. Today, the College has grown dramatically with over 1,300 students registered at SIFC” (Saskatchewan Indian Federated College, SIFC, 2003). The SIFC offers its programs and services on three campuses; Regina, Saskatoon and Prince Albert (Northern Campus). On June 21, 2003, name changed to First Nations University of Canada” (Saskatchewan Indian Federated College, SIFC, 2003).

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Food and Drug Act:
(Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 221).
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food sources: see diet
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fur trader:

For the full references of works cited above, please see the Glossary References page >>

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