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Aboriginal Health &
Cultural Diversity Glossary

Aboriginal Glossary
N
nation
National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation (NAAF), 1985
National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO)
National Aboriginal Health Research Training Program, Edmonton, AB
National Indian Brotherhood (NIB)
National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program, NNADAP, 1975, 1982
National Network for Aboriginal Mental Health Research, NNAMHR, 2001:
Native
Native Access Program to Nursing (NAPN), 1985
Native Council of Canada
Native Mental Health Association of Canada
Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC):
natural history
Natural Resources Transfer Agreement (NRTA), 1930
Nechi Holistic Approach
Nechi Institute
Neutral (people)
newcomers
north
non-status Indians
Northern Advancement Program
Northern Medical Unit University of Manitoba
North West Company
North West Mounted Police (NWMP), 1873
nosologies
Nunavut
nursing science
nutrition
nutrition (see also diet)
Nutrition Canada Survey, 1975
 

 

N – Definitions

National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation (NAAF), 1985
“The National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation (NAAF), was founded in 1985 by John Kimbel. It helps to fulfill the Aboriginal dreams of Aboriginal youths and highlights the abilities of achievements of Aboriginal peoples (personal communication Cornelia Weinan, lecture at U of Saskatchewan, January 29, 2003).

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National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO):
“National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) was previously known as the Aboriginal Health Institute and the organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal Peoples Health. NAHO is a Knowledge-Based organization, devoted to the protection and validation of traditional knowledge. We aspire to link the Aboriginal community worldwide to Studies in Health and Best Practices, in our efforts to advance Aboriginal healing and wellness practices” (National Aboriginal Health Organization, 2003).

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National Aboriginal Health Research Training Program, Edmonton, AB:
“The National Aboriginal Health Research Training Program, is located in Edmonton, Alberta. The Edmonton ACADRE center was set up to create a collaborative and interactive network of mentors in Aboriginal health research training, bringing together resources from academia and Aboriginal communities. This program will concentrate on research in 3 areas: (1) chronic health issues such as diabetes and heart and lung diseases; (2) child health, including fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects, nutrition, and acute illness; and (3) addiction, mental health, and suicide” (Reading & Nowgesic, 2002, p. 1399-1400).

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National Indian Brotherhood (NIB):
“In 1972, the National Indian Brotherhood (NIB), now the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) published a landmark document "Indian Control of Indian Education" declaring that education of Indian people must affirm their identity and fit them with skills for participation in contemporary society” (Barman et al., 1987; Battiste and Barman, 1995; Castellano et al., 2000, as cited in Castellano, 2002)
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National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) 1975, 1982:
“The National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) funds prevention programs and treatment services aimed at the community, including women, in a holistic manner” (Health Canada, 1996, as cited in Health Canada, 2003).

National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) 1975, 1982:
“The Medical Services Branch of National Health and Welfare developed the
National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program in 1775 as a pilot project in 1975, it became a permanent program in 1982. Contributions are given to communities for prevention programs, inpatient and outpatient Treatment Services, construction of facilities, training and research. Expenditure on the program -16 million in 1982-3had tripled by 1986-87” (Canada, Auditor General, 1987, Section 12:87; as cited in Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 94, 180).

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National Network for Aboriginal Mental Health Research, NNAMHR, 2001:
“ The innovative National Network for Aboriginal Mental Health Research, launched in November 2001, is cofunded by CIHR-IAPH and the CIHR Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction. The network addresses critical mental health needs of Aboriginal people in rural and urban settings. It will train new researchers and will provide research consultation services for and in collaboration with Aboriginal communities. Possible areas of mental health research include alcohol and drug addictions, volatile substance abuse, compulsive behaviors, suicide, abuse of prescription drugs, and sexual abuse” (Reading & Nowgesic, 2002, p. 1399-1400).

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Native Access Program to Nursing (NAPN), 1985:
Since 1985, “The Native Access Program to Nursing (N.A.P.N.) is a support and retention service for Aboriginal Nursing students enrolled in the Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan (N.E.P.S.). Support is also available for Aboriginal students enrolled in the Post-Registration Program and the Master's Program at the College of Nursing. Our mandate is 'Success and Excellence for Aboriginal Nursing students”' (University of Saskatchewan, 2003).

Native Access Program to Nursing (NAPN), 1985:
“National Native Access Program to Nursing (NNAPN) began in 1985 at the University of Saskatchewan. Funded by the Medical Service Branch (MSB) [renamed the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) in 2000” (Health Canada, 2003)]. This is a pre-nursing program designed to help Aboriginal students gain admission to university (degree-granting) nursing schools. It began with just eleven students in 1986” (McNab, 1993; as cited in Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 251). “Medical Service Branch (MSB) renamed the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) in 2000” (Health Canada, 2003).

Native Access Program to Nursing (NAPN), 1985:
“The Native Access Program to Nursing (N.A.P.N.) is a support and retention service for Aboriginal Nursing students enrolled in the Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan (N.E.P.S.). Support is also available for Aboriginal students enrolled in the Post-Registration Program and the Master's Program at the College of Nursing. Our mandate is 'Success and Excellence for Aboriginal Nursing students'” (University of Saskatchewan, 2003).

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Native Council of Canada (NCC):
Native Mental Health Association of Canada:
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Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC):
“The Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC) is a prominent Aboriginal women’s organization” (Aboriginal Women, Industry Canada, 2003).
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natural history:
“Natural history is the interaction of three different factors: the susceptible host, the causative agent(s) and the environment, when they are in balance, health is maintained. When there is a state of imbalance, disease may be present or the host may be vulnerable to the disease” (Clark, 1996).
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Natural Resources Transfer Agreement (NRTA), 1930:
“Agreements with Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta transferring the administration of natural resources and the control of Crown lands from Canada to the province. All three agreements included provisions for the transfer of unoccupied Crown lands to enable Canada to fulfill its treaty obligations to First Nations”
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Nechi Holistic Approach:
“Our approach to training and healing must be holistic and balanced, focusing on the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual aspects of the person” (Nechi Training, Research and Health Promotions Institute [NTRHPI], 2003. 5).
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Nechi Institute (Alberta) Poundmaker’s Lodge:
“The Nechi Institute in Alberta is a unique facility for training individuals, (primarily Aboriginals) in addiction counselling. It is the training wing of Poundmaker's Lodge, and represents an attempt to combine both traditional Aboriginal and biomedical/psychotherapeutic techniques in a holistic, and intense, program of instruction. It has achieved the paramount role in Canada for such training and is considered essential for both Aboriginal and other governments” (Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 253).
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Neutral (people):
(Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 30).
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newcomers:
”This is a polite term Native People use. It describes the people who began settling on Turtle Island after Columbus arrived in 1492. Most of these people arrived from Europe” (Canadian Health Network, 2000).
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non status Indians:
"Indians" in Canada who are Aboriginals without specific tribal membership are called ‘Non-status Indians’. ‘Status Indians’ corresponds to the U.S. definition of "Indian"; in that they all carry a tribal identification (Bellfy, 2001, p. 11).

non-status Indian:
“An Indian person who is not registered as an Indian under the Indian Act. This may be because his or her ancestors were never registered, or because he or she lost Indian status under former provisions of the Indian Act” (Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, 2000).

non status Indians:
“Those Aboriginal peoples who were culturally ‘Indian’ but who for a variety of reasons lost legal status (or who never gained it in the first place), are often referred to as ‘non-status Indians” (Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 10).

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north “The North”:
“Land in Canada located north of the 60th parallel. DIAND’s responsibilities for land and resources in the Canadian North relate only to Nunavut, the Northwest Territories and the Yukon” (Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, 2000).
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Northern Advancement Program:
“University of Northern British Columbia’s (UNBC's) Northern Advancement Program, one of several initiatives offered by universities across Canada that help Aboriginal students make the transition to higher education” (Bergman, 2002).

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North West Company, late 1700’s early 1800’s:
“North West Company was a fur-trading organization in North America in the late 18th and early 19th cent.; it was composed of Montreal trading firms and fur traders. The conflict over the Red River Settlement led to virtual warfare between the companies, and the final solution was the union of the two companies in 1821. The name of the older company was kept and there was no longer a North West Company” (1upinfo, 2003).
North West Company:
“In 1821, the HBC and the NWC amalgamated to form a new, leaner HBC, the position of the Indians engaged in the fur trade deteriorated dramatically” (Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 13).
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North West Mounted Police (NWMP), 1873
“The North-West Mounted Police (NWMP) formed in 1873, provided some medial services to Indians, often acting as agents for the department of Indian affairs” (Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 149).
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nosologies:
“Nosologies group events of sickness on the basis of criteria that are detectable and deemed significant. The IDC-9 and the DSM-IV are examples. Every culture has its own medical nosology. A nosology is useful if it helps understand the sickness, if it allows prediction of their course, if it facilitates communication of experience of sickness, if it enables a more effective response, preventing, curing, or palliating sickness” (Woods, 2003).
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Nunavut:
“Nunavut is the new Canadian territory that came into being April 1, 1999” (Nunavut Handbook, 2003). The population of Nunavut is 29,000, most of whom are Inuit, the indigenous people who for countless years have called Nunavut home (Government of Nunavut, 2003).
Nunavut:
“The territory created in the Canadian North on April 1, 1999 when the former Northwest Territories was divided in two. Nunavut means “our land” in Inuktitut. Inuit, whose ancestors inhabited these lands for thousands of years, make up 85 percent of the population of Nunavut. The territory The has its own public government” (Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, 2000).
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nursing science:
“Health-promoting nursing science is focused on "understanding human experience and personal meaning of the health condition" (Lindsey & Hartrick, 1996, p. 108). It is consistent with a human science perspective that emphasizes "whole beings, a gestalt of mind, body, and spirit" (Lindsey & Hartrick, 1996, p. 108, as cited in Reynolds Turton, 1997).
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nutrition:
“The act or process of nourishing or being nourished; specifically; the sum of the processes by which an animal or plant takes in and utilizes food substances; word ‘nutrition’ dates back to 15th century” (Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 2003).
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Nutrition Canada Survey (Canada, DNHW 1975b):
“The Nutrition Canada Survey (Canada, DNHW 1975b), conducted during 1970-2, had a separate Indian sample selected from twenty-nine bands across the country (n=1,808) and an Inuit sample from four communities in the Northwest Territories (n=346)” (Waldram, Herring, & Young, 1995, p. 74).
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For the full references of works cited above, please see the Glossary References page >>

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