College Banner University of Saskatchewan College of Nursing College of Nursing

Aboriginal Health &
Cultural Diversity Glossary

O – Definitions

off-reserve:
“A term used to describe people, services or objects that are not part of a reserve, but relate to First Nations” (Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, 2000).

Back to Top

Office of the Treaty Commissioner (OTC):
“In 1989, the Federation of Saskatchewan Indians and the Government of Canada created the Office of the Treaty Commissioner (OTC) with a five-year mandate to provide recommendations in the areas of Treaty land entitlement and education. The OTC played a vital role in the signing of the Treaty land entitlement agreements between 28 First Nations and the Governments of Canada and Saskatchewan. The Office continued to work in Treaty land entitlement and education until its mandate expired in March 1996” (Office of the Treaty Commissioner, 2003).

Back to Top

Ojibwa people:
“By contrast, the Ojibwa were migratory hunters and gatherers. There was a clear distinction made between male and female roles in Ojibwa society” (Aboriginal Women, Industry Canada, 2003).

Ojibwe people:
“The Ojibwe people of the Great Lakes region are also known as Ojibway, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Anishnabe and are commonly characterized as Eastern Woodland Indians. A full ethnohistory of the Ojibwe people of the Great Lakes region since contact with French missionaries in the 1600s is outside the scope of this overview” (Reynolds Turton, 1997).

Ojibwe people:
“The Ojibwe are one of the largest groups of native people in North America and are characterized as intensely religious and fiercely independent (Grim, 1983; Cornell, 1986). Yet there is a paucity of nursing and other health literature addressing the health-related beliefs of Ojibwe people” (Reynolds Turton, 1997).

Back to Top
‘on her moon’:
”This term describes a woman’s menstrual period. For Aboriginal People, all life is directly linked to the cycles of the earth and the moon. Like many other cultures, Aboriginal People believe that a woman’s menstrual cycle follows the cycles of the moon” (Canadian Health Network, 2000).
Back to Top

Ooligan grease:
“A popular medicine is Ooligan grease, which is made from fish oil, and is an all-purpose healing remedy used for colds, flu and used as a sleeping pill. The grease is put in soups and used as a dip for fish. It is not put in a pill form but rather seen as a natural remedy for use on a daily basis. Interestingly, Ooligan grease was considered to be “one of the most valuable natural resources for the Native Americans of the Pacific Northwest Coast. The oil, which is easily rendered, was a prized trade good having an enormous range of uses” (Ooligan News, 2003, p. 1).

Ooligan grease:
“Ooligan grease was high in vitamins and highly nutritious and was called “ha la mootxw, which means, for curing humanity” by the northern tribes of BC (University of Oregon, 2003, p. 1).
Back to Top
oral history:
“Evidence taken from the spoken words of people who have knowledge of past events and traditions. This oral history is often recorded on tape and then put in writing. It is used in history books and to document claims”
Back to Top
oral tradition:
“The oral tradition, refers to the tradition that those with experience and memory of "the old times" were the appropriate teachers. Thus, an elder's teachings were the most highly respected” (Reynolds Turton, 1997).

oral tradition:
“Stories from the oral tradition, also called myths or legends, provide valuable insight into the cognitive orientation, or health-world view, guiding the health beliefs of aboriginal peoples. In modern parlance, the word "myth" is often thought to be synonymous with falsehood or fallacious belief” (Reynolds Turton, 1997).

Back to Top
Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion, 1986:
“The first International Conference on Health Promotion, met in Ottawa, November 21st, 1986, presenting the CHARTER for action to achieve Health for All by the year 2000 and beyond. This conference was primarily a response to growing expectations for a new public health movement around the world; health promotion in line with moral and social values (World Health Organization, 1986).
Back to Top

For the full references of works cited above, please see the Glossary References page >>

UofS Hompage