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Pharmacy Researcher Receives Funding from Fedoruk Centre for Nuclear Research in Saskatchewan

Developing new ways to use medical isotopes for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers and other diseases in humans and animals, designing more robust materials for nuclear power plants and the long-term storage of nuclear waste, measuring greenhouse gas emissions in the uranium industry, and understanding how people communicate and receive scientific information are just some of the topics that will share over $2 million in funding from the Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation.

Eleven projects, led by researchers from the University of Saskatchewan, were selected from proposals received by the Fedoruk Centre during a call for proposals last February. These projects support development in the Fedoruk Centre’s four impact areas: nuclear medicine, nuclear techniques for materials research, nuclear energy and safety, and the physical environmental and social aspects of nuclear development.

The project involves the synthesis of new nuclear imaging agents based on natural products and novel components of cell membranes with the goal of detecting tumours and understanding how tumours take up these compounds. In partnership with the Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, trainees will learn the principles and techniques of working with radioisotopes used in PET imaging and apply these skills with the probes they develop, bringing that expertise back to Saskatchewan.

Nuclear Medicine

Chemical and Enzymatic Synthesis of Novel Medical Imaging Probes

  • Project Leader: Prof. David Palmer, Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan
  • Co-Investigators: Dr. Ed Krol, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, U of S; Dr. Chris Phenix, Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute
  • Partner: Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre

The project involves the synthesis of new nuclear imaging agents based on natural products and novel components of cell membranes with the goal of detecting tumours and understanding how tumours take up these compounds. In partnership with the Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, trainees will learn the principles and techniques of working with radioisotopes used in PET imaging and apply these skills with the probes they develop, bringing that expertise back to Saskatchewan.

Dr. Ed Krol joined the College in July 2001 and is currently an Associate Professor of Pharmacy and Pharmacy Graduate Chair.

For more information regarding Dr. Krol's research program, visit the Krol research group homepage.

For more information regarding the Fedoruk Centre, please visit http://www.fedorukcentre.ca/index.php