[Department of Philosophy, University of Saskatchewan, 100 Years]

Undergraduate Course Descriptions


200 LEVEL | 300 LEVEL | 400 LEVEL


Note: The following course descriptions are provided for information only. The definitive list of course descriptions and program requirements can be found in the University Course and Programs Catalogue.

 

 

PHIL 110.6 — 1&2(3L)
Introduction to Philosophy
This course explores some central problems of philosophy through modern and historical texts. Questions covered include: Is the world as you experience it? How do you know what you think you do? Does God exist? What ought we to do? What is beauty? What is a mind? Philosophy proceeds by the presentation and evaluation of reasons for alternative answers to fundamental questions and leads to improved critical, evaluative, and writing skills.

Note: No previous training in philosophy is required or presupposed. Students with credit for PHIL 120 or 133 may not take this course for credit. Students with credit for PHIL 120 or PHIL 133 should take the one they are missing for equivalency to PHIL 110.


PHIL 115.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introductory Indigenous Philosophy
This course introduces students to key concepts in indigenous philosophy, covering the main areas of philosophy such as value theory, the nature and limits of human knowledge, and the fundamental nature of existence. Sample topics include the unique character of Indigenous moral systems, Aboriginal ways of knowing, and the differences between Indigenous and Western European philosophies.

Note: This course may be used in partial fulfillment of the Humanities and General Requirements in most Arts & Science programs.Students may contact the Undergraduate Student Office (student-advice@artsandscience.usask.ca) to ensure the course may be used in their program.


PHIL 120.3 — 1/2(3L)
Knowledge, Mind, and Existence
This course explores philosophical questions regarding consciousness and personal identity, the nature of reality, knowledge and justification, the existence of God, freedom, and the nature of the self. Philosophy proceeds by the presentation and evaluation of reasons for alternative answers to fundamental questions and leads to improved critical, evaluative, and writing skills.

Note: Students with credit for PHIL 110 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 133.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Ethics and Values
This course explores fundamental questions regarding morality, justice, and beauty. Questions covered include: What makes a society just? Do we have obligations regarding what is right? What makes acts good? Are values merely relative? What makes something a work of art? Philosophy proceeds by the presentation and evaluation of reasons for alternative answers to fundamental questions and leads to improved critical, evaluative, and writing skills.

Note: Students with credit for PHIL 110 may not take this course for credit.


PHIL 140.3 — 1/2(3L)

Critical Thinking
An introduction to essential principles of reasoning and critical thinking, designed to introduce the students to the analysis of concepts, to enhance their ability to evaluate various forms of reasoning and to examine critically beliefs, conventions and theories, and to develop sound arguments. Topics include fundamentals of logic and analysis, definition, logical fallacies, and conceptual analysis.

Note: Students with credit for PHIL 240, 241, 243 or CMPT 260 may not take this course for credit. To receive credit for PHIL 140, 240, 241, 243, or CMPT 260, students must take PHIL 140 prior to the above mentioned courses.


PHIL 202.3 — 1/2(3L)

Philosophy of Religion
This course explores philosophical questions regarding religion, such as the existence of God, the problem of evil, religious language, religious experience, faith and reason, and morality and religion.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 206.3 — 1/2(3L)
Early Modern Philosophy
An examination of key authors and texts from Descartes to Hume. Early modern philosophy covers one of the central historical periods of philosophy and saw the emergence of science and development of modern theories of mind and knowledge. This course covers rationalist and empiricist explanations of reality, knowledge, consciousness, and the origin of ideas, as well as the challenge of and responses to skepticism.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 120.
Note: PHIL 206 is required for all Philosophy major programs



PHIL 208.3 — 1/2(3L)

Ancient Philosophy: Presocratics to Plato
A study of the origins of philosophical reasoning in ancient Greece to its most extensive development in the philosophy of Plato. Classical views of the ultimate nature of reality, the scope and limits of human knowledge, and the grounds for aesthetic and moral evaluations will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 209.3 — 1/2(3L)

Ancient Philosophy: Aristotle to Plotinus
The development of philosophy in ancient Greece and Rome from the time of Aristotle to the emergence of Christianity. In addition to a survey of several of the most important aspects of Aristotle's philosophy, this course will examine such schools of thought as Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Neoplatonism.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credits at the university.


PHIL 210.3 — 1(3L)

Medieval Philosophy I: From Rome to Baghdad and Paris
The study of major thinkers of the early middle ages, including Augustine, Boethius, Eriugena, Anselm, and Abelard. Background will be provided to Neoplatonic themes that shape this period. Topics include free will, happiness, the existence of God, theories of truth, and the problem of universals.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 211.3 — 2(3L)

Medieval Philosophy II: Philosophy and Faith
The study of major Jewish, Muslim, and Christian thinkers of the high middle ages, including Moses Maimonides, Avicenna, Averroes, Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. Background to Aristotle and his tradition will be provided. Topics include the relation of faith and reason, existence and nature of God, human nature, voluntarism, and the critique of metaphysics.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 212.3 — 1/2(3L)
Medieval Intellectuals
An interdisciplinary examination of major intellectual figures in their historical and philosophical contexts from late antiquity to the end of the middle ages. Themes include the liberal arts tradition, the relation of faith and reason, the emergence of mediaeval science, the rise of Scholasticism, the mystical tradition, and the classical revival.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level History or Philosophy.


PHIL 215.3 — 1/2(3L)
19th Century Philosophy: From Romanticism to Revolution
The 19th Century is an age of radicalism and reaction and its philosophy responds to the contradictions of its time by asking how we are to live in the world we create, raising critical questions about aesthetics, morals, education, religion, and the state. This course explores the major thinkers of this period from Hegel to Marx, and may include philosophers as diverse as Schopenhauer, Comte, Bentham, Mill, Nietzsche, and James.


Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 120.


PHIL 218.3 — 1/2(3L)

Existentialism
An introduction to 19th and 20th Century existentialist thought from Kierkegaard and Nietzsche to Sartre. Issues to be explored concern the human quest for meaning in existence and include the nature of the human self, truth, freedom, mortality, the significance of God, and the possibility of interpersonal relations.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 219.3 — 1/2(3L)

Phenomenology
A survey of phenomenological thought, primarily of the early 20th C. This course will include authors such as Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 224.3 — 1/2(3L)

Philosophy of Sexuality
What counts as sex? Does being in a sexual relationship with one person restrict our interactions with others? Is it ever okay to objectify someone? Should society endorse certain kinds of sexual relationship and not others? The focus is on philosophical perspectives on sex, sexuality, gender, and erotic love as we consider questions such as the nature of sex, perversion, masturbation, orientation and identity, homosexuality, objectification, pornography, prostitution, and other moral and political issues regarding sexuality.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 226.3 — 1/2(3L)

Environmental Philosophy
Philosophical issues concerning the human relationship with the natural environment, including ethical and political questions about how we interact with the physical world and its inhabitants and about the interpretation of the natural. Topics may include the value and rights of nonhumans, environmental aesthetics, the identification of the "natural," ecotopias, and global environmental justice.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 227.3 — 1/2(3L)

Feminist Philosophy
This course takes up some of the central debates in classical and contemporary feminist philosophy. The topics covered include the politics of work and family, gender and bias in science, sexual harassment, pornography and oppression, rights and equity, abortion, feminine appearance, women’s "different voice", gender and language, and feminism and respect for cultures.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 231.3 — 1/2(3L)

Ethical Problems
Contemporary ethical problems such as the morality of human sexuality, abortion, euthanasia, manipulation of human beings, war and revolution, environmental ethics, prejudice and discrimination.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 233.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ethical Theory
An introduction to the meta-ethical issues important to an understanding of historically important ethical theories, together with an examination of those theories. Philosophers studied may include Socrates, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Kant, and Mill, among others.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 133.


PHIL 234.3 — 1/2(3L)

Biomedical Ethics
An examination of contemporary biomedical ethical issues such as the definition of a person, determination of life and death, euthanasia, abortion, prenatal diagnosis and intervention, problems in the physician-patient relationship, reproductive technologies, genetic engineering and accessibility to health care.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university


PHIL 235.3 — 1/2(3L)

Business and Professional Ethics
An overview of ethical issues related to business enterprises and professional practice, including questions concerning labour relations, preferential hiring, advertising and marketing, as well as questions about responsibility to society, to the organization, and to the profession. The course may also consider theoretical questions concerning free enterprise, forms of business organization, and government controls and regulations.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 236.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ethics and Technology
An overview of ethical issues related to the impact of modern technology on society, on scientific research, on the activities of corporations and professionals, and how technology affects our understanding of ethical responsibility. Specific topics that may be considered include issues in biotechnology (including genetic engineering and genomic medicine), information technology (including data privacy and the use of encryption technologies), as well as related issues such as intellectual property rights and risk assessment.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 237.3 — 1/2(3L)

Law and Morality
An introduction to philosophical issues regarding law and its relation to morality. Issues to be explored concern the nature and validity of law and the law's proper limits in relation to topics such as freedom of expression, pornography, the definition of family and marriage, civil disobedience, abortion and capital punishment.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 238.3 — 1/2(2L-1T)

Ethical Issues in Scientific Research
Introduction to ethical issues related to scientific research requiring institutional ethics review and approval. Theoretical approaches in ethics and their relationship to national and institutional guidelines governing research protocol compliance are considered. Topics include Aristotelian, Kantian and Utilitarian ethics, ethical standards in designing research protocols, and protection of research subjects.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 240.3 — 1(3L)
Aristotelian Logic
The meaning of concept, term, judgement and proposition, categorical and hypothetical reasoning and induction; mathematical logic (Venn diagrams, truth trees, elementary deductions, syllogism). Frequent exercises will be assigned.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 241.3 — 1/2(3L)

Introduction to Symbolic Logic I
An introduction to modern logic. Truth-functional statement logic and first order predicate logic. Formalization of natural language statements and arguments.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.
Note: Students with credit for PHIL 243 may not take this course for credit, nor may students take PHIL 241 and 243 concurrently. To receive credit for both PHIL 241 and 243 students must take PHIL 241 prior to PHIL 243.


PHIL 243.3 — 1/2(3L)

Introduction to Symbolic Logic II
A continuation of the propositional and monadic logic covered in PHIL 241. A brief review, followed by polyadic predicate logic with identity and various operators; definite descriptions, adverbial modifications, quantification over properties; introduction to modal logics and their philosophical significance.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 241 or CMPT 260.
Note: Students with credit for PHIL 242 may not take this course for credit.


PHIL 251.3 — 1/2(3L)

Philosophy of Science
An introduction to the nature, extent and significance of scientific knowledge. Problems about the nature of scientific theories and models, scientific explanation and prediction, scientific growth, and issues about the relationship between science, religion and morality will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or 12 credit units in a natural science.


PHIL 262.3 — 1/2(3L)

Social and Political Philosophy
An examination of philosophical theories of political organization. Such issues as justice and power, rights, freedom and the public good will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy, history or a social science.


PHIL 265.3 — 1/2(3L)

Decision and Choice Theory
An examination of rational choice in individual and collective decision-making. Topics include: decisions under certainty, risk and uncertainty, and probability, belief and value as utilized in choice principles. The course will explore maximization of expected utility, minimal loss/regret, optimism-pessimism, basic game theory and applications in moral, social and political decision-making.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 267.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Philosophy for Children
A practical course in the philosophy of education focussing on school aged children in communities of philosophical inquiry. Students will learn techniques for facilitating philosophical discussions with children using thought experiments, stories and reasoning games, and will gain practice in those skills through visits to the schools once a week for the latter eight weeks of the term.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of PHIL courses.


PHIL 271.3 — 1/2(3L)

Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art
This course explores basic issues in aesthetics. What is art? Are aesthetic judgments objective or merely subjective matters of taste and feeling? Is it possible to have standards of criticism? Is art fictional and if so can it be true? What is the place of art in human life?

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy, fine arts or literature.


PHIL 281.3 — 1/2(3L)

Theory of Knowledge
Examines the status and extent of our knowledge of the world, of ourselves, and other people. Problems about the nature of knowledge, the justification of claims of knowledge, the relationship of knowledge to belief and truth, perception, and the viability of scepticism will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 120.


PHIL 285.3 — 1/2(3L)

Persons Minds and Bodies
An introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. Topics include: consciousness, thought, intentionality, emotions, action and the will, other minds (human and artificial), the concept of the self and theories about the nature of the mind.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 292.3 — 1/2(3L)

Metaphysics: Reality, Existence, and Change
An investigation into some central problems of metaphysics regarding the nature of reality. Questions to be considered may include: What exists and how does it continue through time? What is time? What are things? Are humans free? What are causes? Are there selves and can they remain the same if they change?

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 120.


PHIL 294.3 — 2(3L)

Philosophy of Human Nature
A philosophical examination of whether there is a human nature, through both historical and contemporary discussions. Will include topics such as the importance of narrative, biology and evolution, selfishness, gender, race, freedom, and personhood.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 296.3 — 1/2(3L)

Nature of Material Reality
A study of the philosophy of nature which examines ancient and modern views on the material constitution of bodies, organisms, and persons. Major topics include the nature of substance, the distinction between properties and substances, artifacts and natural things, and the mind-body problems.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or 12 credit units in natural science.


PHIL 298.3 — 1/2(3L)

Special Topics
Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


PHIL 299.6 — 1&2(3S)

Special Topics
Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


PHIL 302.3 — 1/2(3L)
Contemporary Philosophy of Religion
A study of major topics in recent analytic and/or continental philosophy of religion. Topics include the rationality of religious belief, the nature of God, religious language, the problem of evil, critiques of religion, and the interface of major world religions.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.

PHIL 306.3 — 3L
Topics in Early Modern Philosophy
A seminar in early modern philosophy focussing on the work of a specific philosopher or a philosophical topic.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in philosophy.

Note: Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 312.3 — 1/2(3S)

Great Philosophers I Historical Figures
Detailed reading in the work of a major philosopher such as Aristotle, Hume or Russell.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.

Note: Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 313.3 — 1/2(3S)

Great Philosophers II Contemporary Figures
Consists of detailed reading in the work of some major philosopher.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.

Note:
Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 314.3 — 1/2(3S)

Kant
Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) is generally regarded as one the greatest philosophical thinkers of the Enlightenment, and of all time. This course will offer an examination of the Kant’s philosophical thought, including the critical system developed in Critique of Pure Reason, and a study of his practical philosophy.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 315.3 — 1/2(3S)

Hegel
An examination of Hegel’s thought which was highly influential throughout the 19th century and beyond. The course will explore the dialectical method Hegel applied to all areas of human knowledge, including phenomenology, history, and political life.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 319.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in Recent Continental Philosophy
Examines specific issues or authors in current continental philosophy. Areas of discussion might include critical theory, aesthetics, or hermeneutics, and authors such as Foucault, Habermas, Derrida, or Gadamer.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.

Note:
Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 320.3 — 1/2(3S)

Studies in Philosophy
The topic, movement or philosophers studied will vary from year to year.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.

Note: Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 333.3 — 1/2(3L)

Metaethics
Concerned with topics such as the cognitive status of judgements about what is right and good, about the grounds of ethical judgement and the logic of ethical argument, and about the role of rules and principles in ethical dispute.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in philosophy including one of 231, 233, 234 or 235.


PHIL 337.3 — 1/2(3S)

Philosophy of Law
A critical examination of attempts to provide theories of the nature of law. This course will examine the debate between legal positivists and natural law theorists, as well as the reaction to this debate (e.g. Dworkin, legal realists, critical legal theorists, and feminists).

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 343.3 — 1/2(3S)

Philosophical Logic
An introduction to basic topics in philosophical logic such as propositions and the problem of abstract entities, necessity, analycity and the a priori, theories of truth, theories of meaning and reference, existential commitment and presupposition, essentialism, entailment.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 241 or CMPT 260 and 9 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 362.3 — 1/2(3S)

Topics in Political Philosophy
The topic, political philosopher, movement or theories studied will vary from year to year.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 262 or POLS 237.

Note:
Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 396.6 — 1&2(3L)

Metaphysics
Study of philosophical attempts to achieve knowledge of reality beyond the empirical; approached historically in terms of ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary theory; and problematically-in terms of present day concerns, such as space, time, motion, nature, existence, essence, God, soul, mind, idea, freedom, person, death, anxiety and art.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 398.3 — 1/2(3S)

Special Topics
Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


PHIL 399.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics
Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.



PHIL 404.3 — 1(3L)

Advanced Problems in Philosophy and Theology
Philosophical aspects of contemporary psychological and theological problems treated at an advanced level. Selected readings in Freud, Jung, Ryle, Merleau-Ponty, Marcel, Ricoeur and others.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 412.3 — 1/2(3S)
Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas I
The philosophy of Aquinas considered in the areas of philosophical theology, metaphysics, and philosophy of nature.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 413.3 — 1/2(3S)

Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas II
The philosophy of Aquinas considered in the areas of human nature, epistemology, and ethics.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 418.3 — 1/2(3S)

Advanced Analytic Philosophy
Studies developments in analytic philosophy examining representative works of the period including those of such philosophers as Russell and Moore, Carnap, Wittgenstein, Ryle, Austin, Ayer, Quine, Davidson, Nagel, Strawson, Dummet, Putnam, Kripke and Rorty.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 241 or CMPT 260 and 9 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 420.3 — 1/2(3S)

Topics in Philosophy
An advanced seminar in contemporary philosophy primarily for honours students. Focuses on a recent important book or a set of related journal articles on a central philosophical subject. Emphasis will be on student presentations and discussion.

Prerequisite(s): 15 credit units in philosophy.

Note:
Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 433.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in Ethics
An advanced course in value theory. The topic, ethical philosopher, movement or theories studied will vary from year to year.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.

Note:
Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 446.3 — 1/2(3S)

Philosophy of Language
An introduction to philosophical problems about language and linguistic approaches to philosophy. How language represents reality; how language colours our thoughts about reality; language as a vehicle of communication. Traditional accounts of truth, meaning, reference, predication and expression will be discussed, as well as methodology in language study and linguistic philosophy.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 241 or CMPT 260 and 9 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 451.3 — 1/2(3S)

Topics in History and Philosophy of Science
Examines current epistemological, ontological, methodological, conceptual and/or historical topics in the philosophy of the natural or biological sciences. Will treat issues such as the nature and extent of scientific rationality and objectivity, feminist critiques, social constructivism and sociology of knowledge, empiricism, scientific realism, explanation, prediction, and historical studies of science.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 251, or 12 credit units in philosophy, or 6 credit units in philosophy and 12 credit units in a natural science, social science or history.


PHIL 455.3 — 1/2(3S)

Philosophy of Social Science
Examines current conceptual, ontological, epistemological, and methodological issues in philosophy of social science; generalization and prediction in the social sciences, reasons vs. causes, interpretation and meaning of social phenomena, intentionality, explanation of action, reductionism, supervenience, individualism vs. holism, objectivity, realism, constructivism, relativism, facts vs. values, feminism, postmodernism, sociology of knowledge.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 251 or 12 credit units in philosophy, or 6 credit units in philosophy and 12 credit units in a social science or history.


PHIL 481.3 — 1/2(3S)

Topics in Epistemology
Advanced topics in Epistemology; topics such as the nature of belief, perception, justification, truth and knowledge.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.

Note:
Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.



PHIL 485.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in Philosophy of Mind
Advanced Topics in the Philosophy of Mind: topic will vary from year to year, and will include issues such as meaning and mental representation, intentionality, phenomenal consciousness and qualia, folk psychology and propositional attitudes, supervenience and reduction, mental imagery, other minds and personal identity.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 285.

Note:
Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 492.3 — 1/2(3S)

Topics in Metaphysics
Advanced topics in Metaphysics; topics such as the nature of metaphysics, personal identity, universals, skepticism, substance, properties and relations, and necessity and possibility.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.

Note:
Historical and topical content will vary from year to year. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic or period covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


PHIL 498.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics
Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


PHIL 499.6 — 1&2(3S)
Special Topics
Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

 

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Last updated: 27-04-2014

Department of Philosophy
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[University of Saskatchewan]