University of Saskatchewan

April 16, 2014   

Vaccine and Infectious Disease
Organization (VIDO) James Miller

A Century of Innovation

Of Life and Learning

Humanities, social science and fine arts research at the U of S was established early in the University’s history. After founding several colleges and departments that were firsts in the country, researchers have gone on to distinguish themselves on an international level in cultural, artistic and educational studies studies.

Then and Now: Aboriginal Research

Marie Battiste Marie Battiste

The U of S has a long history of encouraging involvement of Aboriginal people in higher education as well as producing renowned research on Aboriginal issues.

1973: At a time when there were only four lawyers and five law students of Native ancestry in Canada, Dean Roger Carter establishes the First Native Law Centre in Canada.

1996: James Miller, Canada Research Chair in Native-Newcomer Relations, publishes the first comprehensive history of Aboriginal residential schooling, to critical acclaim.

1997: There are an estimated 500 lawyers and 12 judges of First Nations ancestry in Canada, of which 353 lawyers and six judges had been introduced to the law via the Saskatchewan program.

2006: The U of S Aboriginal Education Research Centre (AERC), led by Marie Battiste, is selected by the Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) to co-lead a new national network for gathering and sharing information on effective approaches to Aboriginal learning.

Vaccine and Infectious Disease
Organization (VIDO) photo: U of S Archives

Kenderdine Campus

Founded in 1935, the Emma Lake Kenderdine Campus is one of the single most influential artists’ retreats in Western Canada. The Emma Lake Art School helps promote the careers of famous local painters, including Dorothy Knowles, Gordon Snelgrove and Ernest Lindner. In the 1950s, many internationally famous artists and critics led workshops for the benefit of local artists.

Governor General’s Award Winners

1989: English professor Bob Calder wins the Governor General’s Award for non-fiction for his biography entitled Willie, the Life of Somerset Maugham.

1996: Creative writing instructor Guy Vanderhaeghe wins his second Governor General’s award for The Englishman’s Boy. His first Governor General’s award was presented in 1982 for his book of short stories, Man Descending. The Englishman’s Boy has also been filmed as a mini-series.

Mabel Timlin
Photo: L.G. Saunders, U of S Archives Mabel Timlin Photo: L.G. Saunders, U of S Archives
Hilda Neatby, 1953 
	Photo: Paul Horsdal, U of S Archives Hilda Neatby, 1953 Photo: Paul Horsdal, U of S Archives

Honouring University Women

The U of S honours two of its pre-eminent female scholars, historian Hilda Neatby and economist Mabel Timlin in the dedication of the Neatby-Timlin Theatre.

  • Neatby’s 1953 bestseller "So Little for the Mind" ignited national debate on education in the ‘50s.

  • Timlin’s “Does Canada Need More People?” (1951) is one of the earliest classic studies of immigration in Canada. She is also the first woman social scientist to be elected to the Royal Society of Canada.

Quance Speller

Frank Quance, first dean of the College of Education, established a standardized speller base on his research.  The spellers are used in every province in Canada though most of the first half of the 20th century.

1937: English professor Richard Albert Wilson’s book, The Miraculous Birth of Language, is lauded by George Bernard Shaw as proof that the University of Saskatchewan was “apparently half a century ahead of Cambridge in science and of Oxford in common sense.” The book showed the unique role that the invention of language played in human evolution.

1945: The U of S is home to Canada’s first drama department, established in 1945.

Mabel Timlin
Photo: L.G. Saunders, U of S Archives Photo: U of S Archives
Richard Albert Wilson’s book, The
Miraculous Birth of
Language Richard Albert Wilson’s book, The Miraculous Birth of Language
Here, in 1959, actors perform the world premiere of W.O. Mitchell’s play, “Royalty is Royalty”. Here, in 1959, actors perform the world premiere of W.O. Mitchell’s play, “Royalty is Royalty”.


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