Academic and Curricular Nomenclature

Responsibility: Russell Isinger, University Registrar and Director of Student Services
Approval: University Council  June, 2011; June, 2016; June 22, 2017
Date: Effective July 1, 2016

(PDF version)

Purpose
Principles
Authority and Responsibility
Organizational Definitions
Admission Definitions
Student Definitions
Program Definitions
Course Definitions
Class Definitions
Modes of Instruction
Credit Units and Billing Hours
Transfer Credit Definitions
Study Abroad Definitions
Mobility Agreement Definitions
Student Record Definitions
Time-Period Definitions
University Catalogue Definitions and Standards

Supplementary Material: Academic Programs at the University of Saskatchewan


Purpose

The purpose of the University of Saskatchewan Academic and Curricular Nomenclature is to provide a consistent and cohesive language and framework for students, instructors, and administrators to discuss academic programming at all levels throughout the university. Nomenclature defines terms contained in other duly approved University of Saskatchewan policies and procedures and commonly used administrative practices and processes.

Principles

Shared language makes collaboration possible and our nomenclature needs to evolve and be flexible enough to encourage the changes in academic programming that are developing throughout campus. In particular, there is a need to offer compelling, engaging, and challenging academic programs which are creatively designed, are grounded in both global and Indigenous perspectives, utilize new methodologies and approaches, provide future‐oriented professional education, and address areas of societal need. Therefore, the terminology in this document has been developed with a focus on facilitating change and creativity in curricular development, providing structure only to ensure quality and fairness. The guiding philosophy of nomenclature is that we can improve our academic programs by clarifying and revising the language we use to communicate across campus.

Authority and Responsibility

Under the bylaws of university council, council prescribes curricula, programs of study, and courses of instruction, and authorizes the establishment of colleges and departments. This responsibility includes the authorization of policies related to curriculum, programs, courses, and academic administrative structures. The Academic Programs Committee of Council is responsible for recommending to council classifications and conventions for instructional programs.

The registrar is responsible for management of registration and student information systems so that academic programs may be administered in an orderly manner. This responsibility includes the development and implementation of definitions for academic and curricular terminology, including coordinating with other university offices to establish common terminology.

Additional definitions relating to university governance and the administration of nomenclature, students and faculty can be found in The University of Saskatchewan Act (1995), the University Council bylaws, and the USFA Collective Agreement.

Organizational Definitions

Academic Unit
The term "academic unit" is used to describe authority over academic programs and student progression. Primarily, these refer to departments, schools, and colleges, but for specific programs the academic authority could be an academic division, a research centre or an interdisciplinary administrative committee. Regardless of the name, it is the structure and purpose of the academic or administrative unit that determines the nomenclature that applies.
Affiliated College
An educational institution recognized by the University of Saskatchewan as carrying on work of a university level. As described in the bylaws of council, the aim of affiliation is to associate with the university for the purposes of promoting the general advancement of higher education in the province, those institutions which are carrying on work recognized by council as of university grade, where such association is of mutual benefit to the university and the institution seeking affiliation. The colleges affiliated with the University of Saskatchewan are Horizon College and Seminary, Saskatoon; College of Emmanuel and St. Chad, Saskatoon; Gabriel Dumont College, Saskatoon and Prince Albert; Lutheran Theological Seminary, Saskatoon; St. Andrew’s College, Saskatoon; St. Peter’s College, Muenster; and Briercrest College and Seminary, Caronport, SK.
Board of Governors
A governing unit of the university, with duties and authority described in The University of Saskatchewan Act 1995. The board is responsible for overseeing and directing all matters involving the management, administration and control of the university’s property, revenues and financial affairs.
Centre
The university currently hosts a variety of centres, variously known as centres, institutes, units, organizations, networks, or programs, including incorporated entities. For purposes of this policy, a centre is a formally structured organization which is not a division, department, school or college, but which is established within or in conjunction with the university, for the pursuit or support of: scholarly, artistic, scientific, or technological objectives; teaching; or outreach.
  • Type A Centres are those that are organizationally part of one college, and report to a dean. These centres involve activities that complement and enhance the work of primarily one college, and could involve multi-disciplinary and multi-faculty work. The activities of the centre should be congruent with approved college plans and would be established with the dean’s endorsement and council approval. Responsibility for funding of these centres rests with the college.
  • Type B Centres are those that involve activities beyond the scope of a single college and/or involve significant resources and will require the endorsement of the deans involved, the appropriate vice-president (usually the vice-president research) and Provost’s Committee on Integrated Planning (PCIP) before seeking the approval of council. These centres are organizationally part of the university and are subject to university management and control, reporting to a designated dean, an executive director that reports to the vice-provost, or an appropriate vice-president (usually the vice-president research).
  • Type C Centres are incorporated and legally distinct from the university, and which have academic/research implications for the university. These centres must have the authorization of the vice-presidents and secure council approval before being recommended to the Board of Governors. These centres may be either a cooperative relationship involving the sharing of resources, or a landlord-tenant relationship, reflecting the academic interest of the university in the centre’s activities and recognizing the university’s community obligation to promote the greatest community use of its faculties and resources. These centres will report on their academic and research activities to a dean to the extent possible, and/or to an appropriate vice-president. A financial report must also be provided to the vice-president (finance and resources) for the board, and all legal requirements of incorporated entities met.
  • Type D Centres are legally incorporated entities, established to support the activities of the university, but which have no academic focus. Such centres may be proposed by a college or administrative unit, and their establishment would require the approval of the vice-president finance and resources, PCIP, and the Board of Governors. Type D centres would report on an annual basis to the vice-president finance and resources and through that office to the board.


Chancellor and Senate

The duties and authority of the chancellor and senate are described in The University of Saskatchewan Act 1995. In general, the chancellor presides at meetings of convocation and senate, and confers degrees. In general, senate is responsible for non-academic student discipline, examination for professional societies, grants honorary degrees, and confirms the decisions of council in the areas of admission requirements, quotas, the disestablishment of departments and colleges, and the dissolution of affiliations.

College

An organizational unit of the university, the faculty council of which is assigned the general responsibility for the development and delivery of programs and courses leading to degrees, certificates, diplomas and other forms of recognition approved by the university and for matters of scholarship and discipline relating to the students enrolled therein.

The dean of a college is an officer of the university with duties and authority described in The University of Saskatchewan Act (1995). The dean is responsible for general supervision over and direction of the work of the college and of the teaching and training of the students of the college.   In a non-departmentalized college, the college is also responsible for instruction, research and scholarly work, as described for departments.

Department

An organizational unit of a college, the faculty of which is responsible for the development and delivery of instruction and for carrying out research and scholarly work in a particular subject and/or related subjects.

The head of a department is an officer of the university with duties and authority described in The University of Saskatchewan Act (1995). The department head has general supervision over and direction of the work of the department and shall assign teaching duties to the members of the department following consultation with the department as a whole. The head is also responsible to the dean for the satisfactory performance of the work of the department.

Division

A division may be an academic division or an administrative division. Academic divisions are under the authority of University Council, Senate, and the Board of Governors, and operate much like departments, defining the unit’s disciplinary or interdisciplinary approach towards program delivery and research, scholarly and artistic work. Examples of academic divisions include the Division of Nutrition in the College of Pharmacy and Nutrition and the Biomedical Engineering Division in the College of Graduate Studies and Research. Academic divisions operate under the direction of a dean and are often governed by an interdisciplinary committee of faculty members. In contrast to academic divisions, administrative divisions do not require oversight by University Council, Senate, or the Board of Governors. These units are organized to facilitate administration of a group of departments, programs, or other specific activity in order to achieve administrative efficiencies.

Faculty

A faculty member is defined in The University of Saskatchewan Act (1995) as a person who serves as a professor, associate professor, assistant professor, lecturer, special lecturer, instructor, or librarian. The act requires full-time employment. However, the bylaws of university council defines as members of a college or school faculty, those professors, associate professors, assistant professors, and full-time lecturers, who are members of departments which, for administrative purposes, are assigned to the dean of that college or the head of that school.

Federated College

An educational institution authorized by the university to offer for university credit, courses in certain subject areas. As described in the bylaws of university council, a federated college must be authorized by the university to give courses recognized for credit toward a Bachelor of Arts degree in the subjects of at least four departments of the College of Arts and Science. The members of the federated college teaching staff, must possess qualifications sufficiently high to be recognized as members of the Faculty of Arts and Science and shall be so recognized, and the college must be situated on or adjacent to the campus at Saskatoon. St. Thomas More College, Saskatoon, is the university’s only federated college.

Off-Campus

  • Off-Campus Site – a regional college or other educational institution where students may be admitted to the University of Saskatchewan for one or more years of study. Sites designated are reviewed at regular intervals under a policy that requires, among other things that the site offer classes in humanities, social sciences and sciences so that students can complete at least the first year of studies.
  • Off-Campus Class – the administration of the class is not through the main university campus (e.g. through a regional college), if the class is not taught in Saskatoon, or if permitted by the registrar. This definition is used in the determination of student fees.
  • Off-Campus Activity – refers to university-affiliated activities involving faculty, staff, or students which occurs off of the main university campus. This includes academic activities, including fieldwork and all off-campus modes of instruction, and non-academic activities, such as ratified student group events.
  • Off-Campus Graduate Student – students completing thesis and project requirements are considered to be on-campus unless specifically designated by the registrar for program purposes.

    See also "Off-Campus Class" under Course Definitions.

Officers of the University

The authority and duties of the following are described in The University of Saskatchewan Act 1995: president, vice-president and acting president, deans, heads of departments, secretary, and controller. The president is responsible for supervising and directing the academic work of the university, its faculty and student body, and the business affairs of the university.

School

A school may be a university-level or a college-level school. Differences between colleges and university-level schools exist relative to representation on University Council, the appointment of faculty, and the collegial review processes and career progression of faculty within the school.

The university-level school is governed by a faculty council and carries a status that is similar to a college, with the head of the school having a status similar to a Dean. The head of the university-level school is responsible for the school’s curriculum, financial affairs and human resource requirements and reports to the Provost and vice-president academic. Faculty associated with the school are assigned through a variety of appointments and are responsible for the general responsibilities assigned to colleges, which include outreach activity, service, research, and the delivery of programs. These programs are most often graduate programs that are interdisciplinary in nature. Examples include: the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, the School of Environment and Sustainability, and the School of Public Health.

The college-level school is an academic unit focused on the delivery of programs and courses within a college. These programs may be accredited and prepare their students for particular professional designations. The college-level school carries a status that is similar to a department, with the head of the school reporting to the dean of the associated college. The college-level school may be governed by a faculty council. Examples of college-level schools are the School of Physical Therapy in the College of Medicine, which offers the Master of Physical Therapy and the School of Professional Development in the College of Engineering, which offers the Certificate in Professional Communication.

University Council

A governing unit of the university, with duties and authority described in The University of Saskatchewan Act 1995. In general, council is responsible for overseeing and directing the university’s academic affairs. This includes establishment of departments, colleges and programs; affiliations; student discipline for academic offences; admission standards and quotas: scholarships and bursaries; examinations; library policies; and advising the board on physical and budgetary plans.

ADMISSION DEFINITIONS

Admission Category

A way to differentiate and compare applicants with similar qualifications (i.e. regular admission, special admission).

 Admission Qualifications

These are the credentials that an applicant must present in order to establish eligibility for admission. They include but are not restricted to objective qualifications such as high school subjects, secondary or post-secondary standing, minimum averages, English proficiency, and minimum scores on standardized tests. Qualifications may vary for some admission categories. Colleges may make recommendations to University Council concerning the qualifications for admission to programs offered by the college.

 Admission Requirements

These consist of all admission qualifications, selection criteria and administrative processes (such as completion of application form, payment of application fee, adhering to application deadlines) that an applicant must present or complete to be considered.

 Provisional Admission
Available to applicants who have attempted less than 18 credit units and are currently in grade 12 or wish to take a course for interest only.

Regular Admission
Applicants who have completed grade 12 and those who are in attendance at, or have attended, other post-secondary institutions.

  • Early Admission – applicants currently completing high school considered based on preliminary high school marks and are admitted with conditions that must be fulfilled by a specified date.
  • Conditional Admission – applicants who have completed grade 12 and those who are in attendance at, or have attended, other post-secondary institutions are considered for admission with partial or incomplete documentation. All conditions must be fulfilled by a specified date.

Residency Regulations for Admission
The required length of residency in Saskatchewan and/or Canada is program specific and is determined by each college, with final approval being conferred by University Senate.

Selection Criteria
These are the means by which a college assesses and ranks its applicants for admission. They include but are not restricted to admission test scores, cut-off averages, interview scores, departmental recommendations, auditions, portfolios, letters of reference, admission essays, definitions of essential abilities for professional practice, and the relative weighting to be given to the various requirements. Selection criteria may vary for some admission categories. Colleges may establish specific selection criteria for admission to programs administered by the college, subject to the general qualifications for admission to the university.

Special (Mature) Admission
Available to applicants who do not qualify for regular admission. Most direct-entry colleges consider applicants for special (mature) admission. Applicants must be 21 years of age or older.

STUDENT DEFINITIONS

Audit Student
An individual who is admitted to the University of Saskatchewan in order to sit in a particular course but do not wish to take the course for credit. Audit students are not entitled to have assignments corrected or to write any examinations.

Continuing Student
An individual who is currently registered and not yet graduating in a college or program at the University of Saskatchewan.

Exchange Student

  • Inbound exchange student: an individual who is admitted to the University of Saskatchewan on the basis of an exchange agreement which enables the student to pay tuition to their home institution, and to register and study at the University of Saskatchewan, with credit transferred back to their home institution.
  • Outbound exchange student: an individual who is admitted to a host partner institution on the basis of an exchange agreement which enables to student to pay tuition to the University of Saskatchewan, and to register and study at the host institution, with credit transferred back to the University of Saskatchewan.


Full Time Student

A student is defined as being full time if:

  • An undergraduate student who registers for 9 or more CUs (Operational and/or Academic CUs) during a regular term or 4 or more CUs in a spring or summer term.
  • A graduate student who registers for 6 or more CUs (Operational and/or Academic CUs) during a regular term or spring and summer term; or who is designated as having full time status by the College of Graduate Studies and Research.
  • A student who does not meet the above requirements but is deemed to be full time by the university secretary or registrar. Examples include certain DSS students, elected USSU representatives or the editor of the Sheaf.

Graduate Student
An individual who has been admitted to the College of Graduate Studies and Research.

Internal Transfer Student
An individual who is currently studying or who most recently attended the University of Saskatchewan and wants to apply to a different college or program within the University of Saskatchewan. An internal transfer student may apply part way through their studies or they may have already graduated. Applicants who have attended another post-secondary institution after the University of Saskatchewan would then be designated as transfer students.

New Student
An individual that has never attended any post-secondary institution prior to attending the University of Saskatchewan.

Non-Degree Certificate/Diploma Student
An individual who is enrolled in courses not accepted for credit in a degree program. The topics covered by these students may be similar to topics covered by degree students but the distinguishing features are normally differences in the breadth and depth of understanding required for successful completion.

Part-Time Student
Any student who does not meet the criteria of full time student as defined above.

Postdoctoral Fellow (PDF)

An individual with a doctoral degree (PhD or equivalent) completing defined research mentored by a faculty member over a specified time period.

Probationary Student
An individual who has not met the required minimum admission average or has been required to discontinue multiple times. Admission is at the discretion of the college.

Provisional Student
An individual who has attempted less than 18 credit units and is currently in grade 12 or wishes to take a course for interest only. Provisional admission is valid for one academic year and allows the completion of a maximum of 12 credit units.

Returning Student
An individual who has previously studied at the University of Saskatchewan and is applying to return to the same college they last attended, without having attending another recognized post-secondary institution during that time. Students may re-apply after an absence from their studies or they may have already graduated.

Special (Mature) Student
An individual who is 21 years of age or older, has attempted less than 18 credit units of post-secondary studies and does not meet the requirements for regular admission.  

Transfer Student
An individual who has studied at another post-secondary institution prior to studying at the University of Saskatchewan. A transfer student may apply part way through studies at a post-secondary institution, or they may have already graduated.

Undergraduate Student 
An individual who is registered in a degree level course(s) offered by a school or college other than the College of Graduate Studies and Research.

Visiting Student
An individual who is admitted to the University of Saskatchewan, with the purpose of receiving credit at their home institute. Visiting students may be undergraduate or graduate, and they may be here through an established agreement or through a letter of permission.

Visiting Research Student
An individual who has been admitted to the University of Saskatchewan as an undergraduate or graduate student for the purpose of engaging in an approved plan of research with a faculty supervisor. Visiting research students are not assessed tuition, will not be enrolled in any credit course work, and are registered at the university for a period not exceeding six months in any 12 month period.

Year in Program
This designation is attached to a student record for individuals working toward a degree-level certification. It signifies the progress a student has made towards the program requirements and has an effect on administrative process (e.g. assigned registration windows).  
 

PROGRAM DEFINITIONS

Academic Program Type
A prescribed set of requirements related to fields of study within a program.

Certificates and Diplomas
The terminology of "certificate" and "diploma" is used both for degree-level (undergraduate and graduate) programs and for non-degree-level programs.

  • Certificates of Proficiency Under the authority of council and the Academic Programs Committee, these certificates signify the completion of a recognized program of degree-level courses and imply the attainment of a degree-level standard of proficiency, achievement, or promotion. Undergraduate programs in this category include certificates, post-degree certificates, post-degree specialization certificates; graduate programs in this category include certificates, and postgraduate specialization certificates. These programs may be completed alongside a degree program, or as a stand-alone program.

 Undergraduate Programs

  • Certificates
  • Post-Degree Certificates
  • Post-Degree Specialization Certificates

Graduate Programs

  • Certificates
  • Postgraduate Specialization Certificates
  • Diplomas of Proficiency Under the authority of council and the Academic Programs Committee, these programs include degree-level courses, and completion implies the attainment of a university-level standard of achievement which is fully transferable into certain undergraduate degree-level programs.
  • Certificate of Successful Completion These programs are approved by the vice-president academic & provost following consultation with the registrar and the Academic Programs Committee. This term is used to signify the successful completion of a course or program of courses appropriate for post-secondary training but not classified as degree-level courses. The topics covered in these courses may be similar to topics covered in degree-level courses, but the distinguishing features are normally differences in the breadth and depth of understanding required for successful completion. Implies the attainment of a standard of proficiency, achievement or promotion appropriate for post-secondary training. Certificates of successful completion not under the authority of a college shall fall under the authority of an identified administrative unit.
  • Certificate of Attendance These programs are approved by the vice-provost, teaching and learning or the dean of a college, after consultation with the provost & vice-president (academic). This term is used to certify satisfactory attendance at a community-level, non-academic course or program of courses sponsored by vice-provost, teaching and learning or a college at the university. It does not imply attainment of a standard of proficiency, achievement or promotion, and is comprised of non-academic courses numbered 001-009.

Combined Degree
The terms "combined degree" or "second degree" are used by colleges to describe two degree programs containing courses which may be counted toward the requirements of both degrees, so that a student can achieve both degrees in less time than if the programs were taken separately. This can involve the awarding of more than one degree or the creation of a new degree entity.

Community Level Program
These programs lead to certificates of attendance which are available to the general public. They are comprised of a single course or program of courses, usually numbered 001 to 009, which are non-academic, not accepted for credit toward any certificate or degree, and not listed on transcripts.

Degree Program
Approved by council, these programs lead to a specific academic credential, such as a degree, diploma, or certificate of proficiency at this university.

  • Undergraduate Level Program – a program of courses numbered 100 to 699 and other educational experiences intended for students at the university undergraduate level (bachelor degree).
  • Direct-Entry: undergraduate programs which admit students with high-school level preparation.
  • Non-Direct Entry: undergraduate programs which admit students only after one or more years of university-level preparation.
  • Professional: programs which are designed to ensure that students will qualify to receive professional certification from a professional body or association in addition to their degree. Professional certification bodies usually specify course requirements and graduation standards expected.
  • Graduate Level Program – a program of courses numbered 700 to 999 and educational experiences intended for students at the graduate level (post-graduate diploma, master’s degree and Ph.D. degree).
  • Direct-Entry: direct-entry Ph.D. programs at the graduate level allow students to be admitted to a Ph.D. program without having been admitted to a master’s program.

Depth of Study
In undergraduate programs, several depths of study in a field of study are recognized.

  • Minor – (18-24 CUs) is a depth of study which prescribes a minimum number of courses in one or more related fields of study and which may require the student to maintain a specific scholastic standing in these courses. In contrast to degree-level certificates, a minor may or may not include the completion of a capstone course. Cross-college minors are governed by policies and procedures outlined in the “Adoption and Oversight of Cross College Minors” document, approved by University Council in 2007. Cross-college minors are comprised of courses from more than one college. Authority for cross-college minors is distributed as follows:
  • Adopting College - the college responsible for the degree program to which the minor is attached.
  • Resource Unit - may be a college, department, school or interdisciplinary group, which provides the majority of resources for the cross-college minor and is the academic unit with primary expertise for a field of study.
  • Resource College - the resource unit, in the event that it is a department or interdisciplinary group, will reside within an identified resource college.
  • Major (>24CUs) is a depth of study which prescribes a significant number of courses in one or more related fields of study and usually requires the student to maintain a specific scholastic standing in these courses. Colleges offering majors with less than 24 credit units must complete the Consultation with the Registrar Form and obtain Academic Programs Committee approval. Exceptions outside of the credit unit values can be approved only by the Academic Programs Committee.
  • Honours (>42CUs) is a depth of study which prescribes a high number of courses in one or more related fields of study and which always requires the student to maintain a high scholastic standing in these courses (double honours is also permitted as a type of honours program.)
  • Concentration is a depth of study which prescribes a suite of courses that provides students additional expertise and specialized training in one aspect of their major. Typically, a concentration will be similar in requirement to a minor, but the majority of coursework will occur within the student’s major field of study rather than outside of it. A concentration cannot be completed as a stand-alone program, independent of the student’s major field of study. Other formats of concentration are possible such as, for example, the Business Cooperative Education Program.

 Colleges have developed a variety of terms for concentrations (option, specialization within a major, themes, streams, focus, etc.). It is possible (within technical limitations) to have the concentrations appear on the transcript, but these terms collectively are referred to and displayed as "concentrations". While the connotation of "option" varies across academic units, it is necessary to have a single term to describe this level of study, and concentration is the simplest and most descriptive at the university/information systems level.

The first three depths of study within a field of study always appear on university transcripts. Concentrations may also appear on the transcript, provided that the proposed concentration is consistent with Canadian university general practices and/or acknowledged and desirable for professional organizations and accreditation and is feasible within the technical limitations of the transcript’s reporting system. Consultation with the registrar and Academic Programs Committee must be performed for new concentrations to appear on transcripts.

Discipline
Academic areas of study, research and scholarly work are described at many universities as "disciplines" and terms like "disciplinary", "interdisciplinary" and so forth are used worldwide. In considering descriptive terminology for programs and curriculum at the U of S, however, the term "field of study", as defined below, is a more inclusive term to describe student programs.

Dual Degree Program
A program where a student pursues a degree both at the University of Saskatchewan and another post-secondary institution with whom an agreement is established, with the student receiving two degrees at the end of the program, one from the U of S and one from the partner institution. The U of S parchment and transcript reflect the dual nature of the program. The degree can be at the undergraduate or graduate level.

  • Cotutelle Program: A Cotutelle program is a type of dual degree program, where a doctoral student is jointly supervised by two supervisors, each from a different university, and, the student alternates time between the two universities. The student writes one thesis, under the supervision of an advisory committee comprised of members from both universities, and if successful, the student receives two degrees, each recognized by both universities. However, while the dual degree program is an agreement between two programs at two institutions, a Cotutelle program is an agreement tailored to an individual student studying at two institutions.

Field of Study
A field of study requires completion of a number of prescribed courses in a specific subject or discipline. Programs may permit several fields of study. The number of fields of study identified for a student may be limited by policy or practical considerations. In colleges with many fields of study, it is often convenient to group them by program type. For example, the College of Arts and Science defines three program types within the Bachelor of Arts programs and one program type within the Bachelor of Science program; the College of Education types its programs as secondary, and elementary/middle years. Within a program or program type, the student usually is required to complete a particular field of study. See also "Teaching Areas".

Interdisciplinary Program
An interdisciplinary program is a field of study which permits students to study beyond the boundaries of traditional disciplines, to explore the relationships among disciplines in depth, and to integrate knowledge gained into a central theme. It may be cross-departmental or cross-college in nature.

Joint Degree Program
A student pursues a degree at both the University of Saskatchewan and another post-secondary institution with whom an agreement is established. The student will receive only one degree at the end of the program jointly awarded by both institutions, with the parchment issued either from the University of Saskatchewan or from the partner institution. The parchment and transcript reflect the joint nature of the program. The degree can be at the undergraduate or graduate level.

Non-Degree Programs
These programs lead to a certificate of successful completion. A program consisting of courses which are generally numbered between 010 and 099. In some degree-level programs, these courses are treated as cognate courses or can be used towards the completion of a degree-level program

Program
A generally defined set of courses and other requirements described in the catalogue, which the student must successfully complete to obtain a specific degree, certificate or diploma or other recognized qualification. Programs are offered at four educational levels: community, non-degree level, undergraduate, and graduate levels. See also Appendix: Course level numbering.

Program Options
Within the general requirements of a particular program, many colleges provide one or more program options, which identify a specific set of courses and other requirements. Program options may be identified by program type, field of study, depth of study, thesis/non-thesis, and work experience. In graduate programs, a program may have a research option (thesis or project) or a non-research option (course based). Work experience is a program option used to identify a prescribed course or group of courses and associated requirements that provide university-recognized work experience (e.g. Business Co-operative Education Program, internship) in a program.

Residency Regulations for Degree Completion
Residency regulations for degree completion are determined by each college. In some cases, residency refers to a certain number of University of Saskatchewan credit units to be completed toward a program of study. These credit units may be completed online, by distance, or in-person, but must be awarded by the University of Saskatchewan. In other cases, residency refers specifically to the length of time a student must be physically present at the University of Saskatchewan while completing his/her program of study.

Teaching Areas
Similar to fields of study, teaching areas require the completion of a number of prescribed courses in a specific subject or discipline. Teaching areas, however, are specific to the Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) and the Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.(Mus.Ed.)) degree programs. As defined by University Course Challenge (September 2011), teaching areas represent disciplinary fields developed by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Education in order to align with the Saskatchewan pre-kindergarten to grade twelve curriculum areas.

Work Experience Program Options

  • Professional Internship Program is a supervised, practical training period for a student, usually endorsed by a professional association or accreditation body.
  • Cooperative Education Program is a program which allows a student to combine academic study with work experience by combining terms on campus with terms working full-time in a job related to the field of study.


COURSE DEFINITIONS

Course
A unit of study in a subject area defined by a course description, title, and number in the Course and Program Catalogue. This unit of subject material is normally presented over a term to students in one or more registered classes. The smallest formally recognized academic unit of the curriculum is the course – a unit of study in a subject area identified by a description of activities. 

Course Authority
Each course label is normally under the administrative authority of one academic unit. Control and management of course labels are delegated to the registrar, but authority for label association with specific courses remains with APC/council. Three types of authority can be defined for each course:

  • Resource authority: provision of teaching resources for the course
  • Content authority: determining what should be taught in the course. This is the authority that will be listed in the student information system. It is often referred to as academic authority. This authority includes such areas as grade approval.
  • Administrative authority: administration of the course when it is taught, including such areas as times and location of classes, class maintenance and dealing with student complaints.

For most courses, all three types of authority are held within a single department or college (in the case of non-departmentalized colleges). For interdisciplinary courses the three types of authority can be spread over several departments, colleges, or other units.

A course label is a subject area identifier (four alphabetic characters) and the course number (numeric). An academic department or college or interdisciplinary program may offer courses titled with several course labels. Each course label should be under the administrative authority of one academic unit or an identified administrative unit for courses in certificates of successful completion not under the authority of a college. 

Cognate Courses
The practice of allowing students credit for a course from another department. For example, biology allows students to take several agriculture courses for credit towards a major in biology.

Corequisite Courses
A course or other requirement that must be taken at the same time as the course being described.

Course and Class Titles
Effective communication should be the primary consideration when determining appropriate titles. Course titles appear in the Course and Program Catalogue and class titles are listed on transcripts. As such, titles should reflect educational content and should not include administrative details like credit units, etc. Short titles must be limited to 30 characters in length so they can reasonably appear on transcripts and in the student information system and long titles should be no longer than 100 characters.

Course Numbers
Course numbers are used according to the conventional practices established by the university for course numbering, as adapted by each college within the academic structure of its programs.

Consistent with the usual university practice, colleges and departments may develop their own numbering schemes in consultation with the registrar for new and revised courses, based on numbers available and on the order in which they want to have their courses appear in the catalogue. Please see Appendix: Course Level Numbering.

Course numbering will usually follow the conventional practice as described below and shown in the course levels chart.

  • Community level courses: The numbers 01-09 are used for tracking membership in community-level classes and are not used for university credit towards a degree, diploma, or certificate.
  • Undergraduate courses: The numbers 100-109 are used for general introductory courses which are not usually acceptable as a preparation for more advanced work in the subject area. In some specialized cases, 200-level courses may be considered introductory courses.
  • Non-Degree courses: The numbers 010-099 are used for courses developed for non-degree level programs.

The numbers 110-199 are used for courses that introduce a subject area and which could serve as prerequisite to senior-level courses in that subject. These are often referred to as junior undergraduate courses. Usually these are taught in direct-entry programs.

Courses numbered 200-699 are also referred to as senior undergraduate courses, including courses in the first year of a non-direct-entry program. These numbers are used for courses that offer advanced study in a subject area. Some post-baccalaureate certificates requirements are comprised of 500 level courses (e.g. Special Education Certificate). 200-level courses usually have 100-level prerequisites, while 300-level and 400-level courses often have 200-level prerequisites. While 300- and 400-level courses are usually taken in the third and fourth years of a program, they need not be numbered according to the year-in-program in which the student completes them.

  • Graduate courses: The numbers from 700 to 999 are used for graduate-level courses. The 800 series is usually for senior graduate courses which require undergraduate degree completion. The 900 series has been reserved for graduate research and seminar courses.

Consistent with the above scheme, colleges and departments may develop their own numbering schemes in consultation with the registrar for new and revised courses, based on numbers available and on the order in which they want to have their courses appear in the catalogue. The numbers x98 and x99 are reserved by the university for special topics courses, 990 for graduate level seminar requirements, 992 for masters level project-based program requirements, 994 for masters level thesis-based program requirements, and 996 for PhD level thesis requirements. After a course is deleted, that course number cannot be reused for a different course for a minimum of ten years. This avoids confusion for students in registration and transcripts.

Double-Counting or Multiple-Counting of Courses
Applying credit from one course toward more than one degree requirement.

Double-Listing or Cross-Listing of Courses in the Catalogue
The terms "double-listing" and "cross-listing" have been used to describe a variety of academic course delivery methods, but in this document, they are defined as following:

  • Academic Cross-Listing
    Components of two different courses of different levels (often 400 and 800) which are taught by the same instructor in the same location at the same time. For example, sometimes two courses will be scheduled to share lectures, laboratories, or seminars. In this circumstance, the course requirements for completion of each course are different.
  • Administrative Cross-Listing
    Refers to the practice of creating multiple sections for one class in order to facilitate reserved seating for two or more groups of students or other administrative purposes. For example, a class may require a certain number of seats to be allocated to students in several different colleges. This can be accomplished by creating several different sections and administratively cross-listing the sections back into a single class.
  • Double-Listing
    The practice of offering a single course under two different course labels with the course requirements for successful completion being the same for all enrolled students. Typically, double listing is reserved for circumstances involving professional accreditation. The practice relies upon the coordination of multiple offices and is therefore more complex and time-consuming to administer. Historically, double-listing has hindered registration and it should continue to be used as a last resort. Please refer to the policy section for guidelines in the use of double-listing of courses. Proposed double-listings should be circulated through the Course Challenge Process and submitted to Academic Programs Committee for approval.

The following guidelines apply to double listings:

  • Once a student has completed the course then that course label is the one for which they receive credit. However, equivalencies for double listed courses would apply in the event of program changes.
  • The course must be delivered with the same credit units and level for both course labels. Double-listing of an undergraduate-level course with a graduate-level course is not allowed.
  • It must be explicitly stated in the Course and Program Catalogue and on the syllabus that it is a double listed course.
  • Content resource and administrative authority for the double listed course should be clearly explained and each authority must track back to a single unit. By default these authorities would reside with the unit of the faculty member who is delivering that section of the course.

Elective Courses
An elective course is one chosen by a student from a number of courses in a curriculum, as opposed to a required course which the student must take.

Equivalent Courses
Courses that are deemed to possess equivalent content such that they are considered to be interchangeable across all programs, and students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Equivalent status must be honoured by both or all colleges involved.

Moribund Courses
A moribund course is one that has not been taught in the previous 48 months. Moribund courses will be retained in the course archive for an additional 48 months and then will be deleted. A moribund course does not appear in the catalogue but can still be activated for registration.

Mutually-Exclusive Course
Courses that are not entirely equivalent to each other, but possess similar or overlapping content. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses deemed to be mutually-exclusive. However, in contrast to the status of equivalent courses, the mutually-exclusive status is program-dependent and therefore does not automatically apply across all programs. Mutually-exclusive status must be honoured by both or all colleges involved.

Placeholder Course
Placeholder courses are created for administrative purposes, normally to allow students access to university services such as the library and the Physical Activity Complex. These courses may be listed on transcripts, but they do not signify the attainment of academic credit. Placeholder subject codes normally begin with the letter “X.” Final authority for the technical setup or adjustment of placeholder courses rests with the Registrar.

Practicum Courses
At the University of Saskatchewan, a practicum is usually a course in which a student works part-time in a workplace for a specified number of hours per week. However, the term is used widely in undergraduate and graduate education to describe all kinds of work-based learning experiences from single courses to lengthy clinical practice experience

Prerequisite Courses
A course or other requirement that must be satisfactorily completed before enrolment will be permitted into an advanced or succeeding course.

Required Courses
A course that all students following a particular program of studies are required to take.

Selected Topics Courses
Regular course offerings approved by University Course Challenge that allow for the subject of offering to change at the discretion of the Instructor. Typically, these courses are approved with a general topic area, for example, "Topics in Literary and Cultural Theory".

Special Topics Courses
These courses are offered on a special case basis, to allow colleges and schools some latitude in course offerings in special circumstances. These courses must be approved by the faculty of the college responsible for the course, forwarded to APC and the Registrar’s Office for information, and should be numbered 298, 398, 498, 598, 898 or 299, 399, 499, 599, or 899. Special Topics courses are not normally used to substitute for required courses in a program. Please see the Special Topics Policy for further information.

Subject Codes
A code that most accurately and comprehensively represents the subject matter being taught in the course(s). Most subject codes consist of 4 characters. Courses are identified on transcripts and the Course and Program Catalogue by subject codes, so effective communication should be the primary consideration when determining subject codes. After a subject code has been expired, it cannot be repurposed for different subject matter. This ensures the integrity of academic history records.

Interdisciplinary use of Subject Codes
New subject codes are initiated by colleges and approved by the registrar. Approval involves assigning authority for each subject code to a specific department or academic unit within the college of ownership. After approval by the registrar, the college and academic unit/departmental ownership is recorded in the student information system. A college may permit the use of a subject code under its authority by another academic unit for a specific course or courses, with the secondary unit then having administrative, content and/or resource authority for this specific course.  This arrangement requires the agreement of the college authority and is contingent upon consultation with the registrar and the approval of APC via the course challenge process.  This arrangement would allow for specific classes to be delivered and administered by faculty from another academic unit (a different resource authority), which is important and desirable for both inter- and multi-disciplinary programs.  This would mirror the cross-college minor system where both colleges must agree to the minor for it to be delivered.

CLASS DEFINITIONS

Class
While "course" is used to identify subject matter, "class" is used to refer to the offering of a course to one or more students within a term.

Class Scheduling for Common Components
Components of two different courses can be taught in common – for example, sometimes two courses will be scheduled to share lectures, laboratories, or seminars. In this circumstance, the course requirements for completion of each course are different.

Registered Class
When a group of one or more students register in a course under the general direction of a particular instructor(s) at a given time. Each class requires an assigned academic instructor. A registered class may consist of one or more instructional units. Registered classes are defined by the label of the course under study and a registered class section number or by the term and course reference number attached to the class.

Off-Campus Class
Classes are defined as on-campus or off-campus for various reasons, including assessment of fees. An off-campus class is usually a class offered though a Regional College, at a Saskatchewan Polytechnic campus, or by an affiliated college such as Gabriel Dumont College. All web-based classes are considered off-campus. Occasionally, if an affiliated college is offering a class at the Saskatoon campus, these would still be considered as "off-campus" classes for the purposes of student fee assessment. Such classes are offered at a number of locations throughout the province. They are taught by instructors approved by the university's academic departments. See also "Off-campus" under organizational definitions.

Section Numbers

Classes are identified by section numbers which may contain a prefix indicating the delivery mode or other information. Prefix codes are as follows:

A Taught as a mixture of delivery modes at off-campus sites (multi-mode)
C Taught in person at off-campus sites
E Taught through or for a contracting agency
G Sponsored by a government agency
L Laboratory
N College of Nursing class
P Practicum
R Taught in Regina (used by JSGS)
S Seminar
T Tutorial
U University sponsored classes not taught through U of S
V Television deliver mode at off-campus sites
W Online or web-based deliver mode

Section number without delivery mode codes are 2 characters in length (eg: Section 21 or Section 03). Section number with embedded delivery mode codes are 3 characters in length (eg: Section L01 or Section W21). Certain number ranges also are reserved to help identify various administrative functions of the class:

01-29 General Use - On Campus
30-49 General Use - Off Campus
50-59 *Reserved
60-67 STM Classes
68-69 NORTEP
70-75 Outbound Exchange
76-79 USLC Classes
80-83 SUNTEP (Saskatoon)
84-85 SUNTEP (Prince Albert)
86-87 ITEP (Elementary)
88-89 ITEP (Secondary)
90 *Reserved
91-95 Aboriginal Student Achievement Program
96-99 St. Peter's College

MODES OF INSTRUCTION

Schedule Types
The following types of instruction are offered in various classes (all schedule types are gradable unless otherwise noted).

  • Clinical Service (CL) and Teacher Supervision (SUP) an instructional unit in which the students are required to meet with instructors for scheduled instructional periods to perform a professional service while receiving instruction. Examples are clinical classes in the Health Sciences and Student Teaching in Education. Instruction is typically provided on a one-to-one basis or to very small groups of students.
  • Co-op Work Experience/Internship (COO, IN1, IN2, IN3) the portion of an instructional unit which comprises the counseling and on-going monitoring contact in a paid work experience class. Only the number of instructor hours for the scheduled supervision by a campus instructor should be reported.
  • Field Study (FST) Field study/fieldwork refers to activities conducted for the purpose of research, teaching, or study, and are undertaken by students of the university at any “off-campus” workplace where the standard operating procedures of the university would not apply.
  • Independent Studies (IND) A class offered by a department utilizing non-face to face and non-web based methods of instruction.
  • Individual Research/Reading (RES or RDG) included in this category are individual research, reading and other studies or projects in which each student works independently under the direction and supervision of an assigned instructor(s). The student and instructor usually meet on an "as required" basis. Since the number of hours spent by the student and the number of hours of instruction given by the instructor cannot be determined, only the number of students enrolled in the activity are recorded.
  • Laboratory (LAB) an instructional unit in which the instructor is responsible for instructing, preparing and supervising student investigations, experiments, practicum experiences, etc., usually requiring the use of special equipment or facilities (non-gradable).
  • Lecture (LEC) an instructional unit in which the instructor is responsible for preparing and presenting the course material.
  • Multimode (MM) an instructional unit in which the instructor uses a combination of instruction types in a way which makes a breakdown by specific instruction type difficult.
  • Practicum (PRA) an instructional unit in which the instructor is responsible for instructing, preparing and supervising student investigations, experiments, practicum experiences, etc., usually requiring the use of special equipment or facilities.
  • Seminar (SEM) an instructional unit in which the students usually share some of the responsibility for preparing and presenting course topics. It may include more discussion types of interaction between instructor and students.
  • Supervised Self-Instruction (SSI) an instructional unit in which instructors are scheduled to be available for instruction and supervision of a group of students engaged in solving problem assignments; in using programmed or automated instructional materials; or in other supervised activities. A room or facility may be scheduled for this activity. However, the extent to which the individual student takes advantage of the facility or opportunity to meet with the instructor is not known. Problem labs are an example of SSI. The number of students attending each class may vary; therefore assign maximum enrolment limits as an average number in attendance (can be both gradable and non-gradable).
  • Tutorial (TUT) a mechanism to review in class materials and content with greater student interaction between instructor and students outside of the central lecture (non-gradable).
  • Web-Based (WEB) A class where either the entire class or a majority of the class is presented to students with a web tool.

Instructional Activity Codes

Abbreviations are used to describe instruction type and modes of delivery.

IND Independent Studies
LIVE Live Face to Face
MULTI Multimode
PRINT Print Based
TELE Televised
WEB Web Based
XHIGH High School (Admin Only)
XINA Instructional Mode Not Applicable

CREDIT UNITS AND BILLING HOURS

Academic Credit Units

Academic credit units (CU) define the amount of credit awarded for successful completion of a course and are displayed on the transcript or, in the case of transfer credit, of study elsewhere. A frequent criterion used in judging credit units would be the expected student effort in the course. Hours of instruction are also a component of this value with a course requiring approximately 33-39 instructional course hours of lecture per 3 credit units. Courses may be offered with any whole number of credit units.

Courses offered to meet requirements for a non-degree level diploma or certificate will have courses with credit units at the non-degree level, in contrast to degree-level classes with degree-level credit units, attached to them. Non-degree level credit units are attached to courses appropriate for post-secondary training but not classified as degree-level courses.  Non-degree level courses are numbered 010 – 099. The value of these non-degree level credit units compared to degree-level credit units is established by the college concerned.

Operational Credit Units

For administrative purposes, courses often carry “operational” credit units, rather than academic credit units. While the course may be listed on transcripts with 0 credit units, the operational credit unit weight of the class are used to determine a student’s full or part time status; control the number of classes a student may register in for a term (maximum credit units); determine a student’s loan eligibility; determine eligibility for full or part time months for T2202A processing.

Billing Hour Units

The billing hour (BH) unit applied to a class is used in the calculation of tuition and student fees.

TRANSFER CREDIT DEFINITIONS

Articulation
A process by which institutions assess learning acquired elsewhere in order that credit toward their own credential may be provided.  Articulation is based on faculty decisions and established institutional principles, policies and procedures. It acknowledges the missions of different types of institutions and the quality and integrity of their programs.  Transfer credit is the result of the articulation process.

Block Transfer
The process of granting of credit for a group of completed courses from one institution to another without requiring course-by-course assessment.  An example would be granting a block of 30 to 60 transfer credits for a completed postsecondary diploma at a recognized institution.  Block transfer credit assessments establish and recognize that certificate, diploma, and other program graduates possess the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to succeed in upper-year courses at the receiving institution.

Course-by-Course Transfer
The process of granting credit for a course (or courses) from one institution to another by completing a comparison of course content and learning outcomes for each individual course. Credit may be awarded for a specific U of S course (or courses), non-specific credit for a subject area, or an elective at the junior-level, senior-level, or unspecified-level.

Laddering
Seamless movement of a student between certificate, diploma, and degree studies with no or limited loss of coursework. Typically a student would complete two years in a diploma program and then move into a degree program, completing their studies in an additional two years.

Learning Outcomes
The knowledge, skills, competencies, and abilities that a student has attained and is able to demonstrate as a result of successfully completing a particular set of educational experiences.

Learning Pathways
Different routes that individuals choose to progress into, within, and out of the post-secondary education system. Learning pathways are used to describe the recognized mobility options available to different learners.

Mobility
The ability to move freely from one jurisdiction to another and to gain entry into an academic institution, trade or profession or to participate in a learning experience without undue obstacles or hindrances.

Recognized Post-Secondary Institution
A public or private institution that has been given authority to grant degrees, diplomas, certificates, and other formal credentials by competent authorities within the country or that is widely accepted by other institutions and organizations inside and/or outside the country. Examples that designate an institution as such include a public or private act of the provincial/territorial legislature, a government-mandated quality assurance mechanism, or a national accrediting body.

Transfer Credit (Credit Transfer)
Transfer credit refers to a course or courses taken at one post-secondary institution (the sending institution) that are transferred to another postsecondary institution for credit (the receiving institution). Transfer credit is sometimes also called credit transfer or advanced standing. The U of S accepts, for transfer of credit, courses from accredited institutions in Canada and internationally. The purpose of transfer credit is to give students fair and reasonable credit for academic work which has been completed at another institution and to reduce the likelihood of a student repeating academic work for which there has already been a demonstrated competence.

STUDY ABROAD DEFINITIONS

Cotutelle Agreement

The agreement required to establish a Cotutelle program. Please see “Cotutelle program” under program definitions.

Dual Degree Program
Please see “dual degree program” under program definitions.

Independent Study Abroad

A credit-based education abroad activity initiated and arranged by the student with the home institution, and recognized by establishing an independent leaning course or the granting of transfer credit.

Internship Abroad Program
A supervised work-placement abroad where the primary motivation is educational. Internships may be credit or non-credit, and paid or unpaid.

Joint Degree Program
The agreement required to establish a joint degree program. Please see “joint degree program” under program definitions.

Student Exchange Program
A Student Exchange is a program of study whereby partner institutions establish a reciprocal agreement which enables students to pay tuition at their home institution and to register and study at the host partner institution, with credit transferred back to the home institution. The typical duration of an exchange is one or two terms.

Taught Abroad Course/Program

A short-term credit-based activity, involving a group of students taking one or two University of Saskatchewan courses abroad, under the supervision of a University of Saskatchewan faculty member.

Term Abroad Program
A one term group program abroad with a prescribed course of study offered by an institution such that the student obtains home-institution credit.

Visiting Student Program

A program of study either formally established through an agreement or through a letter of permission, enabling a student to attend the University of Saskatchewan, with credit transferred back to their home institution.  Tuition is paid to the University of Saskatchewan.

Visiting Research Student Program

A program of study whereby an undergraduate or graduate student is admitted to the University of Saskatchewan for the purpose of engaging in an approved plan of research with a faculty supervisor.  Visiting research students are not assessed tuition, and are registered at the university for a period not exceeding six months.

MOBILITY AGREEMENT DEFINITIONS

Block Transfer Agreements
A type of block transfer credit agreement between the U of S and another academic institution which allows a student to complete 1, 2 or 3 years at the sending institution and the balance of coursework at the U of S. This type of agreement goes beyond a basic transfer credit agreement because it specifies that the completion of specific courses, or completion of a specific credential, will fulfill the requirements of a particular program at the U of S. Students would receive their final credential from the U of S. Some examples of these agreements include, but are not limited to: 2+2, 1+3 and 3+1.

Consortium
A network to which the university is a member, along with other universities or institutions with the objective of facilitating student mobility (eg. TASSEP, CALDO, MICEFA).

Dual Degree Agreement
The agreement required to establish a dual degree program. The agreement required to establish a Dual Degree Program.

Home Institution
The institution in which a student is formally enrolled and is expected to graduate from.

Host Institution
The institution which has agreed to accept a student from the home institution for a limited period of study.

Joint Degree Agreement
The agreement required to establish a Joint Degree Program.

MOU (Memorandum of Understanding)
A non-legally binding umbrella agreement that provides a framework for collaborative activities between international partners. This agreement has also commonly been referred to as a “handshake agreement” or “parent agreement.” This agreement is often the beginning of a formal relationship between two institutions.

Student Exchange Agreement
A reciprocal agreement which allows for the exchange of students where students pay tuition at their home institution and study at the host partner institution, with credit transferred back to the home institution. These agreements can be university wide or restricted to specific colleges, departments or levels of study.

Transfer Credit Agreement (Articulation Agreement)
An agreement between two institutions that authorizes studies completed at one institution to be credited toward studies taken at another institution. Transfer credit agreements can be bilateral (with each institution agreeing to recognize the other’s courses) or unilateral. Transfer credit can be recognized course-by-course or as a block transfer credit.

Visiting Student Agreement
An agreement established between two universities that allows students from the home institution to attend the host institution as a visiting student.

STUDENT RECORD DEFINITIONS

Student Record
The student record holds the program and course information related to a specific student. It will typically contain information related to the specific classes, sections, and sessions.

Qualification
The qualification is the degree, diploma, or certificate awarded to the student, which may be accompanied by an indication of distinction (Distinction, Great Distinction, Honors, or High Honours).

Transcript
The transcript is the official and unabridged version of a student’s educational record at the University of Saskatchewan provided to the student and at the student’s request to third parties. The transcript shows the label, title, class, term and result for each course in which a student was registered past the add/drop deadline. It also records such information as faculty actions, suspensions, expulsions, transfer credits, and qualifications and distinctions. The nature, extent and format of information that appears on the transcript are determined by the registrar in accordance with national and international professional standards, normal practice in higher education, and practical systems. An official transcript is one issued directly to another agency or institution and bearing the seal of the University of Saskatchewan and the signature of the registrar. The seal and the signature may be in electronic form in accordance with the university's signing policy.

Parchment
The parchment is a legal document issued by the University of Saskatchewan, that confirms the recipient has successfully completed a specific program and confers an academic qualification. The parchment displays the University of Saskatchewan seal, at minimum the signatures of the university president, university chancellor, university secretary, dean of the college, and the date, degree, and major (or program in the case of the College of Graduate Studies and Research) where appropriate. The nature, extent and format of information that appears on the transcript are determined by the registrar and university secretary in accordance with national and international professional standards, normal practice in higher education, and practical systems.

TIME-PERIOD DEFINITIONS

Academic Calendar
A listing of the dates of major academic events or deadlines for the academic calendar year.

Academic Calendar Year
A twelve month time period beginning May 1st of each year around which admission procedures and curricular changes are organized. Students are generally expected to complete the program requirements approved for the academic calendar year in which they were admitted. As such, program changes and new programs are typically implemented with an effective date of May 1st. The degree audit system evaluates each student’s progress toward program completion based upon his/her designated academic calendar year.

Academic Year
A twelve-month period beginning on July 1st of each year. This is the usual time period used for academic appointments in the hiring and promotion of faculty.

Final Exam Period Definitions
Fall term: The examination period begins on the first day following the last day of instruction and goes no later than December 23rd.
Winter term: The examination period begins the first day following the last day of instruction and goes no later than April 30th.
Spring & summer: The examination periods for spring and summer include the two days following the last day of instruction after each quarter and the 3 days following the last day of instruction after each term.
  • Deferred examinations: A deferred examination is the sitting of a final examination at a time other than the scheduled time and date. A deferred examination may be granted to a student who is not able to complete a final examination through no fault of his/her own, for medical, compassionate, or other valid reasons. These examinations are granted under regulations established by the college and subject to the Academic Courses Policy.
  • Supplemental examinations: A supplemental examination is the re-writing of a final examination. A student may be granted a supplemental examination under regulations established by the college and subject to the Academic Courses Policy.
  • Special deferred and special supplemental examinations: the college may, under extenuating circumstances, grant a special deferred or supplemental examination to a student who submits satisfactory evidence of inability to be present at the deferred or supplemental examination under regulations established the Academic Courses Policy and the college.
Fiscal Year
The fiscal year for the university runs from May 1 to April 30 as defined in The University Act (1995).

Instructional cycle and instructional periods
For fall and winter term standard day period lecture classes:
  • 50 minute instructional periods starting half-past the hour, on the instructional cycle every Monday, Wednesday and Friday; or 75 minute instructional periods starting at 0830, 1000, 1130, 1300 or 1430, on the instructional cycle every Tuesday and Thursday;
  • Edwards School of Business (ESB) offers Monday/Wednesday classes on a 75 minute instructional period AND the current instruction period and instruction cycle does not capture the delivery of MBA and MPAcc classes
For fall and winter term standard evening period lecture classes:
  • 150 minute instructional periods, on the instructional cycle of one evening per week;
For spring and summer terms lecture classes:
  • Presently these are usually taught for about two instructional hours per day (110 minutes), five days per week, but this can vary depending on the course requirements.
Classes can be offered in any day or night standard instructional period except Sundays.

Instructional period
A scheduled period of time in which a group of students participate in a particular type of instructional activity (laboratory, lecture, discussion, etc.) related to a specific subject.
  • Day period – an instructional period currently between 0730 and 1730 hours.
  • Evening period – an instructional period currently between 1730 and 2200 hours.
Classes on campus can be held from 0730 – 2230 using standard time blocks as defined by the registrar. Colleges using non-standard time blocks need the approval of the registrar.

Term
A period of time defined in the Academic Calendar, for which a course for credit may be offered. Terms are identified by the year and the month of when they occur (e.g. 201609 is September of 20016). Each term usually allows for a minimum of 33 instructional period hours of instruction per term. For graduate students, the year is divided into graduate term one, graduate term two and graduate term three.
  • Fall and winter (fall term 1 and winter term 2) - each term usually allows for 13 weeks of instruction followed by the examination period. Fall term 1 runs from September to December and term 2 runs January to April. Some professional colleges have longer fall and/or winter terms, and different start and end times.
  • Spring and summer (spring term 1 and summer term 2) – these two terms begin in mid-May and end in mid-August. Instructional periods and times differ from those in the fall and winter. Spring term 1 runs through May and June and is split into quarter 1 and quarter 2. Summer term 2 runs through July and August and is split into quarter 3 and quarter 4.
  • Irregular terms – some programs have longer terms, and different start and end times. Several colleges deviate from this terminology – for example, for graduate students, the year is divided into graduate term 1, graduate term 2, and graduate term 3, while Veterinary Medicine divides its instructional sessions into "Quarters".
 Quarter
A division of the university academic year composed of half a term.

UNIVERSITY CATALOGUE DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS

University Catalogue
Formerly known as the University Calendar, the University Catalogue is an online document that at a minimum consists of the Course & Program Catalogue and the Academic Calendar as well as any other online content pertaining to tuition & fees and registration and admissions policies and requirements. The nature, extent and format of information contained in the catalogue are determined by the registrar in accordance with national and international professional standards, normal practice in higher education, and practical systems.

Catalogue Format for Programs
All programs shown in the catalogue should list all degree requirements, including specified and elective courses, required averages for graduation, and any other requirements.

Catalogue Format for Courses
The format for presenting consistent course information in all formats includes:

1) the course label (consisting of a subject code of 4 characters and a 3 digit numeric code)
2) the full title of the course (in English)
3) the course academic credit unit value
4) prerequisites (course(s) that must be completed prior to the start of the course for which registration is occurring), corequisites (course(s) that must be taken at the same time as the course for which registration is occurring), permissions and restrictions if any
5) course description of  150 words or less
6) additional information about transferability, duplication, or loss of credit

Title, label, and credit unit value identify the courses used to meet requirements for graduate and undergraduate degrees. Typically credit units are attached to these courses. Courses offered to meet either degree or certificate requirements follow the same identification system as degree-level courses.

Appendix:  Course Level Numbering

Education Level

Course Level

Course Numbers

General Description of Courses Numbered in this Range

Community
001-009
Courses or groups of courses intended for the general public
Non-Degree

Non-University
010-089
Courses intended primarily for Non-university level programs. These are appropriate for post-secondary training and may have content similar to degree-level courses, but do not have the breadth or depth of understanding.

Upper Level

Non-Degree

090-099
Courses which do not require the matriculation level preparation generally required by most Universities as a necessary prerequisite for a first year undergraduate level course in the subject. In particular, this series of course numbers are used when a department also offers a junior level course in a subject for students with matriculation level 30 preparation (identified by a 100 series number). Students should be advised that courses numbered in the 90 series may not be accepted for credit toward a degree in some programs at this or another University and therefore should check course descriptions and program requirements carefully.
University Degree-level
Undergraduate Junior Level
100-109
General introductory courses usually not intended as preparation for more advanced study in the subject but are designed to acquaint the student with a field of knowledge in which they do not propose to concentrate. Students should be advised that these courses may not be accepted as prerequisites for advanced undergraduate study in the subject or as adequate preparation for entry into some programs and should therefore check course descriptions and program requirements carefully.
University Degree-Level
Undergraduate Junior Level
110-199
All other courses offered for junior undergraduate level credit. These courses are usually accepted toward meeting introductory-level program requirements and are usually used as prerequisites to senior-level courses.
University Degree-Level
Undergraduate Senior Level
200-699
Courses intended for an advanced level of study. In some non-direct entry programs, the first digit will indicate the year of the program for which the course has been designed. For example, first year program courses will usually be numbered 200-299, second year program courses 300-399, etc. Post-Baccalaureate Certificate programs would typically use 500-699 course numbers.
University Degree-Leval
Graduate Junior Level
700-799
A graduate course which has a significant amount of content on the undergraduate level should be numbered on the 700 level. A 700-level designation does not suggest that students taking the course are unprepared for the program in which they are registered; it only indicates that they lack the normally expected undergraduate preparation in the subject area of the course itself.
University Degree-Level
Graduate Senior Level
800-899
A course which may be taken only by students who have completed the undergraduate level preparation generally expected for a graduate level course in the subject.
990-999
Graduate Seminars, Projects, Theses, Exhibitions



Supplementary Material: Academic Programs at the University of Saskatchewan