Additional Courses

In addition to all required courses, MA and MSc students must complete a minimum of six credit units and PhD students a minimum of nine additional credit units that complement their area of interest and are specific to one or more streams within the multidisciplinary Vaccinology & Immunotherapeutics Program. These courses are chosen in consultation with the student’s faculty supervisor and with the graduate advisory committee. In planning their schedule, students should remember that not all courses are offered in any given year. Examples of these stream courses include:

Scientific Bases

Design and Production

  • APMC 801.3 - Laboratory in Fermentation Technology
  • CHE 861.3 - Fundamental Biochemical Engineering
  • CHE 862.3 - Advanced Biochemical Engineering

Social and Public Health Issues

In addition, the following are some suggested courses that students may also consider when consulting with their faculty supervisor.


Scientific Bases

MICR 821.3 - Principles of Immunology - Emphasizes the fundamental aspects of immunology dealing with structure, genetics and function of antibody molecules, and the cellular of molecular regulation of immune responses. A portion is devoted to regulation of the immune response to tumours and particular parasites.

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MICR 823.3 - Immunopathogenesis of Microbial Infections - Explores model systems to gain an understanding of how microbial infections are contained by the host’s innate and cognate defense systems and how the activation of the cellular and molecular immune mechanisms contribute to pathology. Topics include: basic mechanisms of immune-cell migration and inflammation, functions of microbe induced cytokines, microbe initiated inflammatory responses such as toxic shock syndrome and granulomas, microbe initiated autoimmune and immunodeficiency diseases and control of microbial infections by immunomodulation and vaccination. Prerequisite(s): MICR 421 or equivalent.

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VTMC 831.3 - Techniques in Molecular Biology - A hands-on laboratory course designed to familiarize students with a wide variety of techniques in molecular biology: manipulation of DNA for cloning and analysis, detection and quantitation of nucleic acids, sequencing of DNA, site directed mutagenesis, purification and detection of proteins, detection of rare nucleic acids by polymerase chain reaction, monitoring gene expression by cDNA microarrays and 2D-protein analysis, nucleic acid-based techniques for identifying organisms. Prerequisite(s): Graduate or upper undergraduate level course on molecular biology; permission of instructor. Note: 5 week course beginning in May.

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VTMC 833.3 - Advanced Virology - Students, in discussion groups and seminars, explore current topics in virology. Some areas discussed in previous years are: interferon response and viral strategies for evading it, viral oncogenesis, viruses and cancer therapy, antiviral agents and viral strategies for resistance, viruses as tools for nanotechnology. Reviews prepared by students will be considered for publication in Student Reviews in Current Virology, an on-line publication.

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VTMC 841.6 - Research Methods in Cellular and Molecular Immunology - This is an intensive hands-on course designed to teach graduate students basic and advanced cellular and molecular methods commonly employed in studying the hosts immunoinflammatory system: cell purification and characterization, antibody production, purification and characterization, T cell assays, ELISA, ELISPOT, bioassays, purification of cells using magnetically-labelled antibodies, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, Northern blotting, and real-time RT-PCR, among others. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Note: 6 week course beginning in July.

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Design and Production

APMC 801.3 - Laboratory in Fermentation Technology - Designed to familiarize limited numbers of students with fermentation research techniques used at the University of Saskatchewan. Commercially available microbes will be used to transform substrates to a variety of end products. Emphasizes operational aspects of laboratory scale fermenters, computer control and measurement of parameters using modern equipment, enzymes and chemical assays. Prerequisite(s): FAMS 212, 434, and 437 or equivalents; BIOC 200; laboratory experience in research and written permission of the Head of the Department.

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CHE 861.3 - Fundamental Biochemical Engineering - Chemical engineering students learn the fundamentals regarding the microorganisms and their industrial applications. Metabolic regulations, enzymatic and biochemical reaction are covered. Batch and continuous fermentations, design of bioreactors, aeration, mixing, sterilization and downstream processing are discussed. Note: Students with credit for CHE 461 will not receive credit for this course.

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CHE 862.3 - Advanced Biochemical Engineering - Covers the most recent areas of research progress in biochemical engineering. Topics include novel bioreactors, large-scale cultivation of plant or mammalian cells, recombinant cell fermentations, novel systems and downstream processing techniques. Prerequisite(s): CHE 461 or 861; or permission of the instructor.

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Social and Public Health Issues

SOC 830.3 - Sociology of Science and Knowledge - The social conditions and consequences of the production, distribution and consumption of scientific and other forms of knowledge are examined in this course. Deploying classical and contemporary theories, specific institutional settings and ongoing debates over concepts and issues such as knowledge society, indigenous knowledge, corporatization of the university, gendered knowledge, etc. are critically examined.

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SOC 831.3 - Sociology Concepts of Risk - Examines the emergence of what has been called the risk society. Topics covered include: risk issues; risk management; communication and perceptions research; the political processing of risk; role of the media; and risk regulation.

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PUBH 807.3 - Health Program Planning and Evaluation - Covers basic concepts and principles of the cycle of health program planning, which includes needs assessment, program development and implantation, process, impact, and outcome evaluation. Both qualitative and quantitative data collection will be addressed. Guest speakers, case studies, and assignments will link conceptual material with concrete applications. Prerequisite(s): CHEP 804 or permission of the instructor.

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In addition, the following are some suggested courses that students may also consider when consulting with their faculty supervisor.

ACB 830.3 - Advanced Topics in Cell and Molecular Biology - Recent developments in cell and molecular biology research will be examined. Students will present and evaluate selected publications from current literature. Among the topics of interest are: Signal Transduction, Development and Differentiation, apoptosis, gene expression/transcription, cell and organelle structure, and DNA dynamics and chromosome structures. Prerequisite(s): At least one senior level course in biochemistry, genetics or cell biology; or permission from the instructor.

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APMC 803.3 - Genetics of Industrial Microorganisms - Detailed study of the genetics of industrially important microorganisms and their relationship to the relevant practices. Seminar presentations review research literature related to the lecture topics. Prerequisite(s): FAMS 437, BIOC 200, and MICR 387 or equivalents; or an undergraduate degree in microbiology or biochemistry. Previous course work in genetics is desirable.

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APMC 837.3 - Industrial Microbiology - Principles of design and operation of fermentation equipment, aerobic and anaerobic fermentation processes leading to industrial chemicals, antibiotics, vitamins and amino acids with emphasis on biochemistry. Influence of biotechnology on the fermentation industry. Demonstrations, field trips and special projects are included. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

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BIOC 812.3 - Protein Structure Function and Engineering - The details of protein structure, domains, folding and targeting, and modern experimental approaches to protein engineering will be presented. The inter-relationship between structure and function in enzyme protein mechanism and regulation will be stressed. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Note: Offered in the academic year 2007/08 and alternative years thereafter (2009/2010, etc.).

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BIOC 830.3 - Cell Biochemistry - The biochemical properties of eukaryotic cells will be investigated with special emphasis on post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins, cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, signal transduction, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. Students will be asked to research one of the topics discussed in the course by consulting the current literature and prepare a term paper. Prerequisite(s): BIOC 211; BIOC 310; or permission of the department. Note: Offered in 2005-06 and alternate years thereafter (2007-08, etc.)

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BIOC 843.3 - X-ray Crystallographic Structure Determination - Describes the principles, methodology, application and limitations of the techniques in x-ray crystallographic structure elucidations. The methods employed to solve both small molecule and macromolecular crystal structures will be discussed and a small molecular structure determination will be carried out by the students. Prerequisite(s): BIOC 200 (or 203); or equivalent and permission of the instructor; MATH 110, and 112 or 116 are also advised. Note: Offered in 2005-06 and alternate years thereafter (2007-2008, etc.).

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BIOL 811.3 - Cell Biology - Review of the literature on selected topics including microscopic and sub-microscopic cellular organization, and cell function. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

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CHEP 800.3 - Epidemiology I - Introduces the basic epidemiologic methods used to evaluate the distribution and determinants of disease. Includes both lectures and interactive seminars to provide students with practical experience in epidemiologic problem-solving. Examples will be drawn from the fields of both communicable and non-communicable disease.

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CHEP 801.3 - Epidemiology II - Advanced concepts of epidemiologic theory and methods. Advanced biostatistical techniques will be applied to a series of epidemiologic problems from different fields within epidemiology. Prerequisite(s): CHEP 800; or equivalent and 3 credit units in statistics.

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CHEP 805.3 - Biostatistics I - Designed for life sciences students who wish to understand and apply commonly used advanced statistical methods which they are likely to encounter in their career. The emphasis is on the appropriate application of these research methods and the correct interpretation of their results. Topics covered are: analysis of variance, non-parametric methods, multiple regression and logistic regression. Computer software used: SPSS. Prerequisites: STAT 244, 245; or equivalent.

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CHEP 808.3 - Health Policy and Politics - An introduction to theory, research and practice in the field of health policy. More specifically, the course will provide an opportunity to critically examine the process of health policy development, analysis and implementation as well as better understand what influences policy. Prerequisite(s): CHEP 804 or equivalent.

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MBA 823.3 - Biotechnology Management - Assists students to develop a framework for understanding and analysing the influence of external dimensions – such as government policy – upon the research, development and commercialization of biotechnology based products.

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MBA 824.3 - Biotechnology Commercialization - Provides a practice oriented bridge between the laboratory and world of commerce. It examines the theory and practices of launching new business ventures in the biotechnology industry through the research, development, preparation and presentation of a Business Plan. Practising biotechnology managers, entrepreneurs and special advisors will describe their activities and experiences in a series of seminars.

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MICRO 417.3 - Molecular Virology - Representative members of known animal virus families are used as models of biological events at a macromolecular level. Topics covered are virus purification and analysis methods, virus structure and self-assembly, virus genomes and genome expressions, virus proteins and their function, and virus-cell interactions during lytic, transforming, persistent and slow virus infections.

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PUBH 803.3 - Health Promotion - This course covers the underlying concepts, principles, historical development, theory, and current practice of health promotion. The focus of learning is not so much on “how to do” health promotion, as on “how to think” about the conceptual, ideological, and political issues which underlie health promotion practice. Topics include: empowerment and community, change in individuals, small group development, community organization, healthy public policy, coalition-building and advocacy, linking research and action. It is recommended that this course be taken in year 1, term 2 of a student’s program of studies.

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PUBH 832.3 - Infectious Disease Epidemiology - Lectures and exercises will provide an introduction to epidemiology of infectious disease including issues in diagnosis and surveillance, disease ecology and transmission, options for control, discussion of diseases important to public health, emerging diseases, and reporting. Prerequisite(s): A graduate level course in epidemiology and an introductory course in microbiology and permission of the instructor. Note: Students with credit for VTMC 832 will not receive credit for PUBH 832.

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PUBH 852.3 - Canada’s Health Care Systems - Introduces students to the administrative and financial structures of health care services in Canada and to the role expectations of different interest groups and stakeholders involved in the delivery of health services. Examines the organizational structure and operations of health care delivery systems and agencies. Explores the operations of community health centers, hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, long term care institutions, home health care services and various other public health services.

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PUBH 864.3 - Health Care Ethics and Law - Divided into three major sections. Section 1 explores the theory of ethics and places ethical issues and problem solving in a practical context, and focuses the law portion on issues pertaining to health care management. Section 2 provides a brief overview of the Canadian legal system. Section 3 covers such legal concerns of patients and health care providers as negligence, informed consent, and the regulation of health professions.

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PUBH 867.3 - Health Care Policy and Politics - Deals with program and service planning for health care at the institutional, community, regional and provincial, national and international levels. The course takes a macro approach to broad health policy and planning goals and follows these policies through to the level of institutional implementation. Policy analysis is an important component and much class time is spent analysing real life policy documents.

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SOC 820.3 - Medical Sociology - Comparative study of Health-Care systems, Medical Institutions, and the relationships between Medical and Allied Health Professions, Society, the State, and the delivery of health-care. Prerequisite(s): Written permission of the instructor.

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VTMC 830.3 - Recent Advances in Microbiology - A requisite for students in Veterinary Microbiology. Partly tutorial, consisting of assigned reviews of recent advances in selected areas of microbiology, including bacteriology, epidemiology, immunology, parasitology and virology. These discussions are student-driven and facilitated by individual faculty members with expertise in the areas of discussion. Training is also given in the writing of grant applications, such that a major part of the course comprises each student writing a full-scale, mock Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) application that addresses their proposed dissertation research.

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VTMC 838.6 - Applied Epizootiology - Students become familiar with the philosophy and principles of epizootiology and the practical application of epizootiologic techniques as they apply to control. Consists of lectures, field trips, epizootiologic exercises and syndicate sessions.

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VTMC 839.3 - Topics in Advanced Parasitology - Lectures on current topics in parasitology focused on examples from domestic animal, wildlife and human parasitology that illustrate key principles of host-parasite-environment systems. Group discussions based on assigned reading in the scientific literature, with topics selected in part according to students interests.

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