Requirements

 

NOTE: The responsibility for identifying all requirements and for meeting them within the appointed time-frame rests with the student.

1. Major Area of Study

At the time of application, students shall choose one of the following major areas of study, within one of the three Sections of the program:

Section

Major

Biblical Studies

Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
New Testament

 

Interdisciplinary Theological Studies

Systematic Theology and Philosophy of Religion
History of Christianity and Historical Theology
Ethics and Church & Society


Pastoral Studies

[Yet to be determined]



The possibility also exists for a student to do a cross-Sectional major, i.e. a major drawing on subject matter from two of the Sections.

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2. Course Work

Track 1

Six graduate level semester courses are required.

  • Three courses in the major area (at least two at the 400 level, one of which may include a focus on methodologies, if required by the section)
  • Two courses in a minor area
  • Critical Thinking Seminar, IU 400 (a required component of this seminar is attending the GSC seminar series, at one of which the student will report on his/her own work)

In addition, students in a Track 1 program are required to write a Thesis as the final component of their program (see below).

 

Track Two

Eight graduate level semester courses are required.

  • Four courses in the major area (at least two at the 400 level, one of which may include a focus on methodologies, if required by the section)
  • Three courses in other areas (at least one course at the 400 level)
  • Critical Thinking Seminar, IU 400 (a required component of this seminar is attending the GSC seminar series, at one of which the student will report on his/her own work)

Once the requirements for seminars and 400-level courses have been met, students may obtain credit towards the STM in two additional ways:

  • By taking M.Div. courses (at the 200‑ or 300‑level) with supplemental work arranged with the instructor. Such courses will be identified as graduate courses (e.g., on transcripts) by the suffix G added to the course number. It is the responsibility of the student to indicate at the beginning of such a course that it is being taken for graduate credit. Courses at the 100‑level are excluded from the STM program with the exception that students majoring in biblical studies may study a second biblical language as an elective in their degree program.
  • By arranging for Reading and Research courses with an appropriate faculty member. Such courses require the consent of the student's Program Adviser.

The minimum passing grade for a course is 70 per cent. Classes for which a student has been assigned a grade lower than 70 per cent must be repeated or the student must offer a substitute.

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3. Thesis

The final requirement for the Track 1 program is the successful completion of a thesis.

Supervision

The supervision of the thesis is the responsibility of the student's Thesis Adviser, working in conjunction with the respective Sectional Committee.

Proposal

The student shall choose the subject of the thesis in consultation with the Thesis Adviser.
Before being allowed to proceed with the thesis project, the student is required to present a thesis proposal for approval, first by the Thesis Adviser and then by the Sectional Committee.
The thesis proposal should contain the following elements: 

  • working title; 
  • brief statement of purpose; 
  • longer introduction to the project, commenting on such things as the reason why the project is interesting or important, the scope of the material to be covered, the methodology to be used, possible results, etc.;
  • tentative outline;
  • core bibliography.

Form

The thesis must be typewritten or computer printed in a letter quality style. While there are no rigid length limitations, theses should normally be in the range of 20,000 to 35,000 words. The title page should conform to the normal STM format, and should be followed by an abstract (200 words).

The thesis itself should conform to one of the standard style guides in its most recent edition; e.g., K. L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations; W. G. Campbell and S. V. Ballou, Form and Style;  MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Theses and Dissertations. Whichever of these authorities is chosen, the student shall ensure that the rules are applied consistently throughout the thesis.

Oral Defence

When the Thesis Adviser has determined that the thesis is ready for defence, he or she will inform the Director, who will arrange for an oral examination of the thesis after first determining that all other requirements have been met. The examination committee shall consist of the Thesis Adviser and at least two other faculty members. The members of the committee will be appointed by the Director, who will ensure (wherever possible) that each of the three schools is represented. The Director shall normally preside at the oral examination.

At the end of the oral examination the committee shall make a decision concerning the acceptability of the thesis and assign one of the following: Acceptable, Acceptable with Minor Revisions, Not Acceptable without Major Revisions and a subsequent Defence, Not Acceptable.

If the Examining committee assigns a passing grade to the thesis, it shall be the responsibility of the Director to present the recommendation of the examination committee for ratification by the Graduate Studies Council, and to inform the Registrar of the school in which the student is enrolled that all requirements have been met. If the committee stipulates any corrections or alterations of the thesis, it shall be the responsibility of the Thesis Adviser to certify to the Director, before the recommendation goes forward to the Graduate Studies Council, that such corrections or alterations have been made.

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4. Time Considerations and Deadlines

The required seminars will normally be offered in concentrated two-week blocks in the spring or summer. This will make it possible for persons to complete the program without having to relocate to Saskatoon for a period of time. Every attempt will be made to offer the required seminars with sufficient regularity that a student will be able to complete them all within a three-year time frame. (Note that this might require doing two seminars in one of the three years.)

All requirements of the program must normally be completed within five years of the commencement of the fourth semester course (Track 1) or the fifth semester course (Track 2). Upon written request a twelve month extension may be granted by the Graduate Studies Council. There is no possibility of further extensions or re-admission.

The responsibility for identifying all requirements and for meeting them within the appointed time-frame rests with the student.

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