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LTS offers six degree and certificate programs: MDiv, BTh, MTS, Lutheran Formation Certificate, Diaconal Ministry Certificate, STM, and DMin.

Master of Divinity (MDiv)

The MDiv program is the standard program which prepares a candidate for ordination.

Requirements for Admission

1. CTEL endorsement.

2. Completion of Application for Admission, including photograph, biography, medical report, application fee and other requested information.

3. Attainment of the Bachelor of Arts degree, or its equivalent, from a recognized college or university together with the official transcript.

4. A demonstrated working knowledge of at least one biblical language is a prerequisite for the MDiv program. This biblical language prerequisite must be fulfilled by completing successfully a six-credit class in Hebrew or Greek on a non-credit basis or by successfully completing a Language Competency exam which occurs during the fall semester of the academic year. This prerequisite must be completed prior to the start of a student’s second year of study by completion of a Biblical Language course during the regular fall and winter semesters of the first year or during Summer Language School.

5. A World Religions course is strongly recommended

6. The receipt of four letters of reference on behalf of the student.

7. Documentation of criminal records check.

Requirements for Graduation

Upon recommendation of the faculty the MDiv degree is granted to students with a BA degree or equivalent and a working knowledge of either Hebrew or Greek, upon the fulfillment of all degree requirements. The attainment of an accumulated average of not less than 65% is necessary in the courses presented for graduation. The MDiv degree program includes the satisfactory completion of one quarter of CPE/PCE, the required cross-cultural immersion experience and a supervised internship.

Purpose

The Master of Divinity program at Lutheran Theological Seminary Saskatoon is an academic and professional degree program designed to prepare and equip women and men for the ordained parish ministry of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada. Normally the program is a four- or five-year course of study involving three or four years of study in residency.

Goals

The aim of the Master of Divinity program is fourfold:

1. to assist all persons in the program to grow in a deeper understanding of and commitment to the liberating Gospel of Christ and the life of the church.

2. to enable all participants to appropriate and to interpret responsibly the primary sources and classic traditions of the Christian faith.

3. to develop and to foster in all students the many practical skills necessary to relate the Gospel of Christ effectively to the concrete situations confronting the life and ministry of the contemporary church.

4. to produce not only well trained pastors but also credible scholars, enabling them over time, to build upon the basic foundation of this program, to pursue advanced theological study or specialized ministries for the enrichment of the church in mission.

Objectives

The faculty of Lutheran Theological Seminary Saskatoon identifies the following objectives to meet these goals:

1. to provide all students with the opportunity to complete the Biblical Language tutorial program in Biblical Hebrew or New Testament Greek, to help them satisfy the language prerequisite for the required exegetical component of the degree.

2. to introduce students to the historical background, content, literary forms, and theologies both the Old and New Testament and to develop in them the necessary exegetical skills to enable them to be effective interpreters and communicators of the Word.

3. to promote a fuller understanding of the Church’s historic and confessional witness to the Gospel and an awareness of how that witness is operative within the Canadian and ecumenical context.

4. to acquaint students with the essentials of Lutheran theology and various approaches to theology and hermeneutics, with a view to develop in them the capacity to think theologically and critically.

5. to familiarize students with the ethical norms underlying Christian responsibility and conduct as presented in the Scriptures and as historically interpreted in the church.

6. to foster a critical awareness of contemporary issues, to practice social analysis and to encourage students to make these issues central to their life and ministry.

7. to help students become informed of current trends in theological reflection and study.

8. to engender foundational perspectives, resources, and skills for the practice of the liturgical and homiletical dimensions of the ordained ministry in the Lutheran church.

9. to introduce students to the theology, nature, and practice of pastoral care and counselling.

10. to instruct students in the stewardship and administration of parish life.

11. to introduce students to the theology and practice of Christian educational ministry.

12. to promote educational opportunities for students who wish to pursue a specific area of concentrated study or interest under faculty direction.

13. to provide students with opportunities for the practice of pastoral ministry and for integrative reflection on these experiences.

14. to involve students in disciplines of spiritual formation including planning and leading daily chapel worship.

15. to provide times, opportunities and forums to reflect upon and discuss issues of concern.

16. to provide all students exposure to the wider global community by providing courses in mission and evangelism and requiring a cross-cultural experience.

Curriculum

The faculty holds that the foregoing objectives of the Master of Divinity program will be achieved through student fulfillment of the following curricular components:

1. a demonstrated competence in at least one biblical language through the successful completion of the required exegesis component in either the Old or New Testament.

2. an accumulated average of not less than 65% over the three or four years of study in residency.

3. successful completion of the required cross-cultural immersion experience, CPE and internship.

Sequence of courses:

REQUIRED CURRICULUM: 21 COURSES

Biblical

BL 150 Introduction to Biblical Studies

BL 112 Old Testament Introduction or BA110 Intro to the Jewish Bible with permission of the Academic Dean

BL 158 New Testament Introduction

Exegetical/Interpretation Course (BL 224 Psalms or BL 227 Isaiah)

Exegetical/Interpretation Course (BL 272 Galatians or BL 275 Romans)

BL 350 Biblical Theology

Required 200- or 300-level Biblical electives (2)

Church History and Historical Theology

HA/HL 111 The Story of Christianity, Part 1: Early and Medieval

HA/HL 112 The Story of Christianity, Part 2: Reformation and Modern

HL 248 Historical Canadian Lutheranism and Ecumenism

SL 120 Lutheran Confessions

Required 200- or 300-level History elective (1)

Systematic Theology, Ethics

SL/PL 155 Globalization Ethics**

SL 210 Theology I

SL 211 Theology II

300-level Contemporary Theology course (1)

Required 300-level Systematic Theology elective (1)

Pastoral Theology

PL 115 Introduction to Liturgy*

PL 215 Introduction to Homiletics*

PL 230 Pastoral Care and Counselling or PE 233 Intro to Pastoral Counselling with permission of the Academic Dean

PL 260 Introduction to Christian Education* or PA 262 Introduction to Christian Education with permission of the Academic Dean

SL 380 Mission and Evangelism

Integrative studies

PL 140 Formation I

PL 240 Formation II

PL 346 Pastoral Integration

*= a course with integrative contextual education site component
**= a course with a required January Term practicum

Electives

  • (9 courses, 5 of which fulfill distribution requirements)
  • Final-year students may elect to write a Master of Divinity thesis worth two elective courses.

Other Required Experiences

  • Clinical Pastoral Education (1 quarter)
  • Cross-cultural Immersion Practicum
  • Internship (9- or 12-month)

The cross-cultural/immersion practicum is described here.

The CPE requirement involves enrolment in an approved three-month program of clinical pastoral education (CPE) or pastoral counselling education (PCE), usually during the summer months. They may also take an extended CPE unit, which is spread over 8 months during the academic year, while taking a reduced course load. In CPE students minister to persons in clinical settings, share and evaluate their individual experiences, and receive feedback from both peers and supervisors. The final evaluation of each CPE/PCE unit is shared with the student who subsequently shares it with the
seminary. CPE/PCE needs to be completed before the internship year.

Students normally complete the CPE component in the summer following the first year of study, or in the summer of the second year. Students may also consider taking their CPE/PCE before they begin seminary, since it is not always easy to get into the program in Saskatoon. Students may need to find a placement outside of Saskatoon.

The internship occurs in a congregation under a supervising pastor. The seminary Director of Contextual Education, the faculty, the supervisory pastor, and congregational representatives are closely involved in the initial placement, progress assessment and final evaluation of the intern and internship.

While the last year of residency is similar to the first two, final year students are expected to work proficiently with a well-integrated perspective on the practice of the ministry.

Each student’s course of study is encouraged and monitored by her/his respective synodical Committee on Theological Education and Leadership (CTEL). Prior to graduation, candidates for ministry in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) are recommended by the faculty for ordination call.

The faculty approaches the academic, practical and immersion experiences set forth for the degree as a holistic program for theological and pastoral formation. The Master of Divinity curriculum embraces the structured learning experiences of the classroom and library; the full realm of personal and corporate experiences of seminary life and daily chapel worship and the building of lifelong collegial relationships.

Bachelor of Theology (BTh)

Brief Description

The BTh program is designed to prepare candidates for ordination who are over thirty-five years of age and who do not have a first university degree.

Requirements for Admission

1. CTEL endorsement.

2. Completion of Application for Admission, including photograph, biography, medical report, application fee and other requested information.

3. Evidence of significant life and work experience and document that it would create undue hardship for the candidate to complete an undergraduate degree.

4. Attainment of one year of university liberal arts study (30 semester hours) at a recognized university (or its equivalent as approved by the Academic Guidance Committee/Faculty). The one year of study shall include courses in English, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology and History.

5. The receipt of four letters of reference on behalf of the student.

6. Documentation of criminal records check.

Requirements for Graduation

Upon recommendation of the faculty, the BTh degree is granted to students over thirty-five years of age at the time of admission, with not less than one year (30 credit units) of satisfactory credit toward a degree at a recognized university or college, upon the fulfillment of all requirements. The attainment of an accumulated average of not less than 65% in the courses presented for graduation.

The BTh program includes the satisfactory completion of one quarter of CPE, the required crosscultural immersion experience and a supervised internship. With the exception of the MDiv requirement of documented working knowledge of a biblical language, the BTh degree program requirements are identical to those of the MDiv (as listed above).

Master of Theological Studies (MTS)

Brief Description

The MTS program is designed for students wishing to study theology for reasons other than ordination, including preparing for church vocations that do not involve ordination to Word and Sacrament ministry.

Requirements for Admission

1. Completion of Application for Admission, including photograph, biography, medical report, application fee and other requested information.

2. Attainment of the Bachelor of Arts degree, or its equivalent, from a recognized college or university together with the official transcript.

3. Receipt of four letters of reference on behalf of the student.

4. Documentation of criminal records check.

Requirements for Graduation

Upon recommendation of the faculty, the MTS degree is granted upon fulfillment of all requirements, including a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent from a recognized university or college, and an accumulated average of not less than 65% in courses presented for graduation. The degree requires completion of an integrative component. One year of courses must be taken in residence (ten courses) at Lutheran Theological Seminary Saskatoon.

Purpose

The Master of Theological Studies (MTS) degree program at the Lutheran Theological Seminary is a two-year program of study in Theology, following the attainment of a BA degree or its equivalent. This program is designed with sufficient flexibility to serve a broad range of interests and needs in the church.

Goals

The aim of the Master of Theological Studies is fourfold:

1. to provide opportunity for the academic study of theology at an advanced level.

2. to help the student prepare for professional non-ordained ministry in the church.

3. to supply a solid background in specific theological disciplines as a basis for further study.

4. to foster integration of faith and practice within the church and in the community.

Objectives

The following objectives are designed to meet these goals:

1. to introduce students to the history and literature of the Old and New Testament as a basis for an appropriate interpretation of the biblical witness.

2. to engender an appreciation of the church’s historic and confessional witness to the Gospel and an awareness of how that witness is operative within the Canadian context.

3. to acquaint students with the essentials of Lutheran theology and various approaches to theology and hermeneutics, with a view to developing in them the capacity to think theologically and critically.

4. to familiarize students with the ethical norms of Christian responsibility and conduct as presented in the Scriptures and as historically understood in the church.

5. to introduce students to the theology, nature, and practice of worship and pastoral care and counselling.

6. to allow students to attain a satisfactory level of expertise in the area of their chosen major and minor, and through consultation with their advisor, to structure a suitable program of courses.

7. to involve students in disciplines of spiritual formation, including planning and leading daily chapel worship.

8. to provide times, opportunities and forums to discuss issues of concern.

Curriculum

The faculty holds that the foregoing objectives of the Master of Theological Studies program are to be met through student fulfillment of the following curricular components:

1. an accumulated average of not less than 65% over the two years of study in twenty courses, including an integrative component

2. satisfactory completion of a selection of courses consisting of the required curriculum and a suitable combination of courses in the area of the student’s special interests, under the following limitations:

MTS REQUIRED CURRICULUM

Biblical

BL 150 Biblical Introduction

BL 112 Old Testament Introduction or BA 110 Intro to the Jewish Bible (with permission of the Academic Dean)

BL 158 New Testament Introduction

Church History and Historical Theology

HA/HL 111 The Story of Christianity, Part 1: Early and Medieval

HA/HL 112 The Story of Christianity, Part 2: Reformation and Modern

SL 120 Lutheran Confessions (if student is pursuing a Lutheran vocation)

Systematic Theology and Ethics

SL 210 Theology

I SL 211 Theology II (or advised Systematic Theology elective)

SL/PL 155 Globalization Ethics

Pastoral Theology

PL 115 Introduction to Liturgy (or advised Pastoral Theology elective)

PL 215 Homiletics (or advised pastoral theology elective)

PL 230 Orientation to Pastoral Care and Counselling or PE 233 Intro to Pastoral Care with permission of the Dean of Studies

PL 260 Introduction to Christian Education or PA 262 Christian Education with permission of the Dean of Studies (or advised pastoral theology elective)

Restricted Elective Curriculum

A major field shall consist of no less than six courses (inclusive of the required courses in each department) in one of the following areas:

1. Old Testament
2. New Testament
3. Systematic Theology
4. History and Historical Theology
5. Pastoral Theology
A minor field shall consist of no less than four courses (inclusive of the required courses in each department) in an area other than the major.

Free Electives

The remaining courses needed to make up the total of twenty are considered free electives.

 

Lutheran Formation Certificate

The Lutheran Formation Certificate program is a program designed to integrate completed MDiv study at seminaries not endorsed by the ELCIC with intensive reflection on Lutheran perspectives in theological and pastoral studies.

Requirements for Admission

1. CTEL endorsement.

2. Completion of Application for Admission, including photograph, biography, medical report, application fee and other requested information.

3. Completion or near-completion of a MDiv program together with the official transcript.

4. The receipt of four letters of reference on behalf of the student.

5. Documentation of criminal records check.

Purpose

The Lutheran Formation Certificate Program is an academic professional certificate program for approved ELCIC candidates for ordination who need to complete a period of intensive reflection on the Lutheran understanding of the core sources of the faith. Candidates who have completed their theological studies elsewhere take this residency to exercise and demonstrate their capacity for confessional, Lutheran critical thinking in the practice of the full range of disciplines for ministry.

Objectives

1. To engage these candidates in rigorous pastoral, theological reflection from core Lutheran perspectives across the range of theological and pastoral areas of parish and specialized ministry.

2. To address any areas in need of remedial work or particular focus in the student’s previous training.

Curriculum

The faculty holds that the fore-going purposes of the Lutheran Formation Certificate shall be fulfilled by:

1. completion of 10 courses chosen in consultation with their faculty advisor.

2. an accumulated average of not less than 65%.

3. participation in the processes of spiritual formation and worship.

Required Courses

Church History and Historical Theology

SL 120 Lutheran Confessions

Pastoral Theology

PL 115 Introduction to Liturgy

PL 215 Introduction to Homiletics

Systematic Theology, Ethics

Senior Theology course

The remaining six courses are chosen in conjunction with the faculty advisor. Although not required for the Lutheran Formation Certificate, other experiences that may be required by the ELCIC CTELs for ordination are: Clinical Pastoral Education, 1 quarter Supervised Internship

Diaconal Certificate Program

The Diaconal Certificate Program is a program that prepares a candidate for diaconal ministries in the ELCIC.

Requirements for Admission

1. CTEL endorsement.

2. Completion of Application for Admission, including photograph, biography, medical report, application fee and other requested information.

3. Attainment of the Bachelor of Arts degree, or its equivalent, from a recognized college or university together with the official transcript

4. The receipt of four letters of reference on behalf of the student.

5. Documentation of criminal records check.

Purpose

The Diaconal Certificate Program at Lutheran Theological Seminary is an academic, professional certificate program designed to prepare men and women for diaconal ministries of the ELCIC.

Goals

The aim of the Diaconal Certificate program is fivefold:

1. to meet the academic expectations for Diaconal ministers as set by the ELCIC

2. to assist participants in the program to grow in a deeper understanding of and commitment to the liberating Gospel of Christ and the life of the church.

3. to enable all participants to appropriate an introductory understanding of the primary sources and classic traditions of the Christian faith.

4. to develop and to foster in all students the specific practical skills necessary to relate the Gospel of Christ effectively to the challenges of diaconal ministries in our church.

5. to produce not only well trained diaconal ministers but also curious students, encouraging participants to commit to build upon the basic foundations of this program develop an on-going process of ministry and reflection in their work and service to the church.

Objectives

The faculty of the Lutheran Theological Seminary identifies the following objectives to meet these goals:

1. to introduce students to the historical background, exegetical tools, content, literary forms, and theologies of both the Old and New Testament and to engage them in the questions of interpreting and enacting the Word in their witness.

2. to introduce participants to the Church’s historic and confessional witness and to locate that witness within the Canadian and ecumenical context.

3. to introduce participants to the essentials of Lutheran theology.

4. to familiarize students with the ethical norms underlying Christian responsibility and conduct as presented in the Scriptures and as historically interpreted in the church.

5. to foster a critical awareness of contemporary issues in relation to the diaconal ministries specific to each student.

6. to introduce students to related fields of pastoral theology as they impact on their diaconal focuses.

7. to involve students in disciplines of spiritual formation including planning and leading daily chapel worship.

Curriculum

The faculty holds that the foregoing objectives of the Diaconal Certificate Program will be achieved through student fulfillment of the following curricular components:

1. completion of the seven required courses and three electives.

2. an accumulated average of not less than 65% in the program. Up to two courses may be taken on pass/fail basis.

Required Curriculum

Biblical

BL 112 Old Testament Introduction or BA 111 Intro to Hebrew Bible with permission from the Dean of Studies

BL 158 New Testament Introduction

Church History and Historical Theology

HL 248 Ecumenism—Shaped by Our Histories

SL 120 Lutheran Confessions (if student is pursuing a Lutheran vocation)

Systematic Theology and Ethics

SL 210 Theology I

SL/PL 155 Globalization/Ethics

Integrative Study

PL 135 Spiritual Formation or PE 131 Spiritual Formation with permission from the Dean of Studies

Required Electives (Choose One)

PL 115 Introduction to Liturgy

PL 230 Orientation to Pastoral Care and Counselling or PE 233 Intro to Pastoral Care with permission from the Dean of Studies

PL 260 Introduction to Christian Education or PA 262 Christian Education with permission from the Dean of Studies

Electives

The remaining 2 courses needed to make up the total of ten are normally chosen from the area of diaconal ministry concentration.

Although not required for the academic requirement of the Diaconal Certificate Program, other experiences that are required by the ELCIC for consecration are:

  • Clinical Pastoral Education, 1 quarter
  • Supervised Internship
  • Diaconal Retreat
  • Courses specific to Diaconal Ministry

Master of Sacred Theology (STM)

This information is taken from section 3 of the STU's STM Handbook. See also the STU's STM/CiRCLe M Handbook and the STU's Graduate Programs pages.

Prerequisites

Admission Requirements

  1. Students must possess a Bachelor's degree from a recognized university or college and an M.Div. degree, or their equivalents.
  2. A minimum GPA of 75 per cent (or its equivalent) in the M.Div. is normally required.
  3. Individuals with a Master of Theological Studies (a two year lay degree) may be admitted: (a) with a major in the Biblical Section normally, if they have a major in Biblical studies (8 semester courses) and meet the language prerequisites; (b) with a major in the Theology, Ethics, and History of Christianity Section if they have an M.T.S. (Honors) or an M.T.S. with a minimum GPA of 75 per cent and meet the language prerequisites; (c) with a major in the Pastoral Theology Section if all other requirements are met (when this major becomes available).

Sectional Prerequisites

In each case, the specific competencies are to be identified and determined by the respective Sectional Committees. Competencies may be demonstrated by successful completion of courses, or by special tests arranged by the Director in consultation with the Sectional Committee. Courses taken to demonstrate a competence may not be credited towards the STM course requirements.

It is preferable that students complete all language or methodology prerequisites before entering the program. This preference notwithstanding, the following requirements apply:

  • In the case of Track 1, one of the two prerequisites is required for entrance into the program; the other must be completed before the student registers for the fourth course.
  • In the case of Track 2, the prerequisite must be demonstrated prior to registration for the fifth course.
Biblical Section

Students enrolled in Track 1 must demonstrate competence in (1) a modern language in addition to English, and (2) the Biblical language appropriate to their major area of study.

Students enrolled in Track 2 must demonstrate competence in the Biblical language appropriate to their major area of study.

In either case, the Biblical language prerequisite must be met before students register for any courses that count toward the major.

Theology, History & Ethics Section

Students enrolled in Track 1 must demonstrate competence in (1) a modern language in addition to English, and (2) an additional language, or other specialized skill, appropriate to the area of research.

Students enrolled in Track 2 must demonstrate competence in a language in addition to English or some other specialized skill appropriate to the area of study.

Pastoral Section*

[Yet to be determined]

Competency in a language is understood generally as the ability to read and comprehend a text in that language (a scholarly text in the case of a modern language; a primary text in the case of a biblical language) with the aid of a lexicon and at a modest rate of speed.

For the purposes of this program, competency can be defined as the facility demonstrated by the successful completion of a second year course in the language with a grade of at least 70%. Competencies can be demonstrated by providing evidence of the successful completion within the previous three years of a course where such facility in the language was required (e.g., a second year course in the language, or, in the case of a Biblical language, of an exegesis course requiring substantial work in the primary texts.)

Alternatively, competencies can be demonstrated by means of a special test arranged by the Sectional Committee, working in conjunction with the Director. In any case, it is the responsibility of the respective Sectional Committee to decide on the means by which a competency is to be demonstrated and to determine whether competency requirements have been met.

With respect to methodological requirements, the defining and testing of such competencies is to be determined by the respective Section. Courses taken to demonstrate a competence may not be credited towards the STM course requirements.

Overseas equivalences

Since methods of recording grades and conferring degrees differ from country to country, overseas students wishing to enter the STM program must write to the Registrar of one of the three schools, submitting details of their academic careers including, wherever possible, transcripts of academic work and copies of any degrees or diplomas held, together with some information about the institutions granting the degrees.

For those whose first language is not English, a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 550 (paper based) or 213 (computer based) is a prerequisite. Test scores must be forwarded directly to the Registrar of the appropriate college.

Qualifying work

Candidates may be required to complete qualifying work prior to formal admittance to the program, at the discretion of the appropriate Sectional Committee.

Application and Admission

Applications for admission can be made to any of the three schools in the Saskatoon Theological Union. Applications forms may be obtained from any of the Registrars.

Applications are received by the Registrar and then forwarded to the Director.

After reviewing the application, the Director forwards it, with any pertinent comment, to the appropriate Sectional Committee, which then sends it on to the Graduate Studies Council, with recommendation.

The Council rules on the application and communicates its decision to the school of registration, which in turn notifies the applicant and (if the decision is positive) enrolls the applicant in the program.

Applications may be submitted at any time during the year, and will be considered by the appropriate bodies as soon as possible. To allow sufficient time for the various stages of the process to take place, however, it is necessary that the application be submitted at least six weeks prior to the meeting of the Graduate Council at which it is to be considered.

Advanced Standing

Credit may be allowed for work done in other institutions. A request for such credit should be made at the time of application, and allowance is at the discretion of the Graduate Studies Council. The maximum allowable is one half of the required course work (i.e., three courses for Track 1, and four for Track 2). If a student has been away from formal theological studies for a period of more than ten years, credit can be given only in those cases where the student can demonstrate that he or she has maintained currency in the field. Demonstration of currency will be determined by the relevant Sectional Committee, using whatever means is deemed appropriate.

Students who have not completed the M.Div., but whose remaining M.Div. requirements do not constitute a full semester load, may take classes for possible advanced credit toward the STM degree in the same semester in which they complete the M.Div. requirements, with the proviso that such classes:

  • not number more than two
  • are not taken as an overloa
  • are declared as graduate courses at the time of registration

The crediting of such classes toward a graduate degree remains in all cases subject to the discretion of the Graduate Studies Council.

Requirements

Major Area of Study

At the time of application, students shall choose one of the following major areas of study, within one of the three Sections of the program:

Section Major

Biblical Studies Hebrew Bible/Old Testament New Testament

Interdisciplinary Theological Studies Systematic Theology History of Christianity Historical Theology Ethics Church & Society

Pastoral Studies [Yet to be determined]

The possibility also exists for students to do a cross Sectional major, i.e., a major drawing on subject matter from two of the Sections.

Course Work

For Track 1, six graduate level semester courses are required: Three courses in the major area (at least two at the 400 level, one of which may include a focus on methodologies, if required by the section)

Two courses in a minor area Critical Thinking Seminar, IU 400 (a required component of this seminar is attending the GSC seminar series, at one of which the student will report on his/her own work) In addition, students in a Track 1 program are required to write a Thesis as the final component of their program (see below).

For Track Two, eight graduate level semester courses are required: Four courses in the major area (at least two at the 400 level, one of which may include a focus on methodologies, if required by the section) Three courses in other areas (at least one course at the 400 level) Critical Thinking Seminar, IU 400 (a required component of this seminar is attending the GSC seminar series, at one of which the student will report on his/her own work)

Once the requirements for seminars and 400 level courses have been met, students may obtain credit towards the STM in two additional ways:

  • By taking M.Div. courses (at the 200 or 300 level) with supplemental work arranged with the instructor. Such courses will be identified as graduate courses (e.g., on transcripts) by the suffix G added to the course number. It is the responsibility of the student to indicate at the beginning of such a course that it is being taken for graduate credit.
    Courses at the 100 level are excluded from the STM program with the exception that students majoring in biblical studies may study a second biblical language as an elective in their degree program.
  • By arranging for Reading and Research courses with an appropriate faculty member. Such courses require the consent of the student's Program Adviser.

The minimum passing grade for a course is 70 per cent. Classes for which a student has been assigned a grade lower than 70 per cent must be repeated or the student must offer a substitute.

Thesis

The final requirement for the Track 1 program is the successful completion of a thesis.

The supervision of the thesis is the responsibility of the student's Thesis Adviser, working in conjunction with the respective Sectional Committee.

The student shall choose the subject of the thesis in consultation with the Thesis Adviser. Before being allowed to proceed with the thesis project, the student is required to present a thesis proposal for approval, first by the Thesis Adviser and then by the Sectional Committee.

The thesis proposal should contain the following elements:

  • working title
  • brief statement of purpose
  • longer introduction to the project, commenting on such things as
  • the reason why the project is interesting or important
  • the scope of the material to be covered
  • the methodology to be used
  • possible results, etc.
  • tentative outline
  • core bibliography.

The thesis must be typewritten or computer printed in a letter quality style. While there are no rigid length limitations, theses should normally be in the range of 20,000 to 35,000 words. The title page should conform to the normal STM format, and should be followed by an abstract (200 words). The thesis itself should conform to one of the standard style guides in its most recent edition; e.g., K. L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations; W. G. Campbell and S. V. Ballou, Form and Style; MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Theses and Dissertations. Whichever of these authorities is chosen, the student shall ensure that the rules are applied consistently throughout the thesis.

When the Thesis Adviser has determined that the thesis is ready for defence, he or she will inform the Director, who will arrange for an oral examination of the thesis after first determining that all other requirements have been met. The examination committee shall consist of the Thesis Adviser and at least two other faculty members. The members of the committee will be appointed by the Director, who will ensure (wherever possible) that each of the three schools is represented. The Director shall normally preside at the oral examination. At the end of the oral examination the committee shall make a decision concerning the acceptability of the thesis and assign one of the following:

  • Acceptable
  • Acceptable with Minor Revisions
  • Not Acceptable without Major Revisions and a subsequent Defence
  • Not Acceptable

If the Examining committee assigns a passing grade to the thesis, it shall be the responsibility of the Director to present the recommendation of the examination committee for ratification by the Graduate Studies Council, and to inform the Registrar of the school in which the student is enrolled that all requirements have been met. If the committee stipulates any corrections or alterations of the thesis, it shall be the responsibility of the Thesis Adviser to certify to the Director, before the recommendation goes forward to the Graduate Studies Council, that such corrections or alterations have been made.

If the examining committee decides that the thesis is not acceptable, the candidate may request the Graduate Studies Council to approve a second defence. In considering such a request, the Council shall take into account the reasons for the candidate's failure in the initial defence, any remedial work undertaken by the candidate, and the opinion of the Thesis Adviser. A second defence may not take place sooner than four months and later than twelve months after the first defence. In case of conflict with the absolute time limits for the completion of the program, the limits can be extended to accommodate a second defence. A candidate who is unsuccessful in a second defence shall be judged to have failed the program.

Two copies of the thesis in its approved form, including the abstract and bearing the signatures of the Thesis Adviser and the other examiners, are to be submitted to the school granting the degree.

Time Considerations and Deadlines

The required seminars will normally be offered in concentrated two week blocks in the spring or summer. This will make it possible for persons to complete the program without having to relocate to Saskatoon for a period of time. Every attempt should be made to offer the required seminars with sufficient regularity that a student will be able to complete them all within a three year time frame. (Note that this might require doing two seminars in one of the three years.)

All requirements of the program must normally be completed

  • within five years of the commencement of the fourth semester course (Track 1)
  • or the fifth semester course (Track 2).

Upon written request a twelve month extension may be granted by the Graduate Studies Council. There is no possibility of further extensions (except for the circumstances described in 3.33.6) or re-admission.

The responsibility for identifying all requirements and for meeting them within the appointed time frame rests with the student.

Appeals

A student who is not satisfied with a grade assigned in a course should speak with the professor and seek to find a statisfactory solution. If such a solution is not found, the student may submit a written statement of the grounds of the appeal , together with the relevant papers, to the Director of Graduate Studies. The Director shall appoint a committee, in consultation with the faculty of the school in which the student is registered, to review the matter. The decision of the committee shall be final.

DMin (Doctor of Ministry)

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Purpose

This program provides ministry professionals with interdisciplinary tools to help congregations and other faith-based organizations engage their communities more effectively, bringing their gifts into stronger partnership with community groups and institutions. The program is cohort-based, distance-format, and deeply engaged with students' ministry context. Although town and country-focused, the tools it offers have transcontextual application and interest.

Expected Outcomes

Students who complete this program will have the following skills and abilities:

  • An ability to analyze community and congregational cultures and provide leadership in building ecumenical and social partnerships to strengthen and develop those cultures
  • An ability to reflect theologically on the role of small and rural churches in the community-building mission of God
  • An expanded set of biblical, theological, spiritual and pastoral resources for ecumenical ministry in rural or marginalized settings.

Admission Requirements

Students must possess an MDiv or MTS degree, or their equivalents as defined by their school of registration.

A minimum Grade Point Average of 75 per cent (or its equivalent) in the above degrees is required.

Students will normally have the equivalent of three years of active ministry subsequent to the completion of their MDiv/MTS degree (or equivalents) and will be located in a ministry site suitable for carrying out a collaborative ministry project.

Foreign equivalences

Since methods of recording grades and conferring degrees differ from country to country, foreign students wishing to enter the DMin program must write to the Registrar of the STU school in which they want to enroll, submitting details of their academic careers. This report should include transcripts of academic work and copies of any degrees or diplomas held, together with some information about the institutions granting the degrees. Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate English fluency as determined by a TOEFL IBT score (including the speaking component) of 88 with no component less than 20. Test scores should be forwarded directly to the Registrar of the appropriate college.

Qualifying work

If there is a question about whether candidates have the prerequisites needed for the program, candidates may be required to complete qualifying work prior to formal admittance, at the discretion of the DMin Committee.

Application Procedures

Applications for admission can be made to any of the three schools in the Saskatoon Theological Union. Application forms may be obtained from any of the Registrars.

Applications are received by the Registrar and then forwarded to the Chair of the DMin Committee.

After reviewing the application, the Chair of the DMin Committee forwards it, with any pertinent comment(s) to the DMin Committee with recommendation(s). The Committee rules on the application and communicates its decision to the school of registration, with a copy of the recommendation sent to the GSC chair. The school where the applicant applied will then notify the applicant of its own decision and (if the decision is positive) enrolls the applicant in the program.

Applications for the DMin must be received by their school of registration at least three months in advance of the formation of a new cohort. Normally new cohorts begin in June.

Program Design

The DMin with a concentration in Rural Ministry and Community Development is primarily targeted towards ministers of all denominations in Western Canada in a town or country setting who are interested in a rigorous program of interdisciplinary theological study aimed at helping them to lead their ministry sites in a more effective engagement with their communities.

The DMin program has three chief components:

  1. colloquia
  2. courses of instruction, and
  3. a project in ministry planned, carried out and written up as a final report in collaboration with a team in the ministry site and presented to an evaluation committee.

Colloquia

The colloquia are opportunities for cohort-building and sharing of learning among cohort members, and counts as 4 credit hours towards the DMin degree.

Colloquium 1 is a ten hour, in-residence orientation to the DMin program. To avoid additional travel it may be held in conjunction with the initial DMin Foundations in Rural Ministry and Community Development course. Students are introduced to the STU faculty, to each other and to the program. The intent is to build cohort cohesion and to begin work on students' DMin learning plans.

Colloquium 2 will be held in distance format using a video-conferencing website. For this colloquium students will need access to a high-speed internet connection and a computer with webcam and earphones. The colloquium will focus on topics of the cohort's choosing under the direction of a professor. They will involve some preparatory reading and email sharing of ideas, together with about 4 hours of on-line discussion.

Colloquium 3, the final colloquium, is dedicated to sharing project ideas and firming up project proposals.

Coursework

20 credit hours of coursework are required. For the DMin program with a concentration on Rural Ministry and Community Development the following courses are mandatory:

  • Foundations for Rural Ministry & Community Development (3 cr)
  • Assessment Tools for Rural Community Analysis (3 cr)
  • Biblical, Theological and Historical Sources (3 cr)
  • Qualitative Research Methods in Rural Settings (2 cr)
  • Capstone Course (3 cr)

In addition, each student will choose two electives from among courses offered at the DMin level and appropriate to his or her learning plan. With approval by the student's Program Director, the student may transfer in as electives up to six credit hours from appropriate graduate courses in other accredited institutions.

The courses will be 5-day intensives, taught by STU and qualified outside faculty from the University of Saskatchewan and other schools. The Centre for Rural Community Leadership and Ministry – "CiRCLe M" may also provide recommendations for qualified faculty. The courses will normally be taught on the campuses of the STU though transfer courses, and one of the STU courses may be offered at another location that would be suitable for learning and cohort access.

Each course has three components:

  1. Pre-class preparation. This may involve substantial reading and other assignments chosen by the professor. Syllabi will be made available to students via the postal service and/or email approximately ninety (90) days prior to the week on campus so the student will have sufficient time to order the required textbooks and complete all reading and/or assignments.
  2. Class time. This will be a five (5)-day interactive teaching module on campus or on a site chosen by the DMin Committee. One module per program may be taught through video conferencing.
  3. Post-class work. This will involve an integrative ministry and/or writing project which draws from assigned readings, classroom presentations and interaction, as well as additional research. Post-class assignments are due ninety (90) days from the arrival of the syllabus, or sixty (60) days from the final day of the class component, whichever is later.

Project in Ministry

The Project, Final Report and Public Presentation of the Final Report count as 6 credit hours toward the DMin degree. Prior to requesting admission, and throughout the first half of the DMin program, students work with their ministry sites (including community members) to identify an area in which a collaborative community-building project might be carried out. This project will be led by a ministry team, chaired by the DMin student, who is responsible for the initial recruitment and training of the team. Instruction in how to form a ministry team is given in Colloqium 1. However, prior to that, as part of their admission documents, the student must give written evidence that the ministry site has given permission for, and is invested in, the DMin program. See "Application for Admission to Saskatoon Theological Union Graduate Studies Programs."

By the end of the fourth course students will have worked with their ministry team to select a community-building issue to research and act on. A proposal for the project will be written up by the student in collaboration with the ministry team. See "Preparing a Proposal for a DMin Project and Final Report."

In its final form, the project involves systematic research and action around a significant issue in the community in which one's ministry is located. It will be written up in the form of a final report, using input from, and language that is accessible to, the ministry team that coordinated the project. In the final report the student and ministry team will seek to integrate the theory, theology and experience of ministry as a community-building practice as it is revealed in their project.

For more information about this program, see the DMin Manual of Policies and Procedures