St. Andrew’s College is located in Saskatchewan but our learning opportunities have no boundaries. We facilitate learning for people throughout the world by offering credit courses in a variety of formats including Internet-based courses and week-long intensive courses. In addition, a number of our independent studies are designed so that they do not require students to come to the college. 

Are you interested in doing some credit or non-credit continuing education or exploring your faith through courses offered by an Association of Theological Schools (ATS) accredited theological college? St. Andrew's has the courses to meet your needs.

If you're interested in registering for an online course, you should assess your own readiness to participate in this form of learning. Download and fill out the Online Learning Readiness Assessment form to help guide your decision. The Online Course Preparation document offers information on how to access and interact as part of online courses.

For more information contact:
St. Andrew’s College
Greg Torwalt, Registrar
306-966-5244
standrews.registrar@usask.ca

Intensive and Online Course Offerings

St. Andrew’s College requires that at least 5 students be registered in each class before it will run. Registrations are received through the student registration database, Populi. New students should contact the registrar’s office for information about these courses at standrews.registrar@usask.ca

Tuition: $675 per 3-credit course. Populi fee: $34. Payment may be made by cheque, cash or credit card.

Download the full list of Intensive and Online Course Offerings in PDF format

Intensive Courses 2018-19

SA340: The Holy Spirit 
November 12-16, 2018  (D. Schweitzer)

Prerequisite: SA113 or permission of the instructor

This course examines the nature and work of the Holy Spirit, looking at how it has been understood in the early church and at present. Topics covered include the role of the Spirit in the economy of salvation, expressions of the Spirit in contemporary church and society, the revelatory role of the Holy Spirit, its relation to the reign of God and the Holy Spirit as the growing edge of God.

BE378: Invitation to Adventure: Luke retells the Jesus Story 
Jan. 7 – 11, 2019  (W. Richards, C. Myers)

Prerequisite: Intro to Christian Scriptures course or permission of the instructor

By the time Luke took up pen to write the story of Jesus, he knew other accounts were already in circulation. But Luke's attention was caught by the spirit of adventure to which the hero had invited his hearers. The same breath Jesus had breathed was inspiring a new community of healing and wonder, among women and men, slave and free, rich and poor alike. To help prepare participants for preaching, study & reflection from the gospel, this course works through Luke's 24 chapters, attentive to the challenge to adventure its Jesus presents. The course may be taken for audit or for credit.

PA110: Introduction to Worship
Jan. 13-15, Feb. 3-5, March 9, April 8-9, 2019; Sunday (full day), Monday (Full day) Tuesday (half day) (H. Kim-Cragg)

Prerequisite: PA110 or completion of 30 credits.

This course introduces students to the history, theology, and practice of Christian public worship. It is designed to gain biblical, historical, theological, and pastoral dimensions on the nature of Christian worship; to explore the praxis of sacramental worship; to gain insights into Christian year, liturgical place, and prayers within worship traditions, music, with reference to its relationship of culture; to demonstrate practical knowledge and experience in leading/presiding worship, writing prayers, and choosing hymns.

HA/SA382: Learning Circle II: United Church History, Theology and Polity
Feb. 25 - March 5, 2019 (D. Schweitzer)

Prerequisites: HA/HL 111/112, SA113, their equivalents or permission of the instructor. This course can be audited (half cost).

This 4 credit course explores the history, theology and ethos of the United Church through an overview of where the United Church has been and how it has got to where it is now. Students will gain an enriched understanding of how the United Church was formed, the journey it has traveled to the present, how it is organized and how it polity functions.

Graduate Level Course in Conjunction with ReJUNEvation
June 17 - 21, 2019 
(D. Schweitzer)

Prerequisite: An introductory course in theology is an expected prerequisite for participation in the course. A limited number of spaces will be available for those wishing to audit the course (half cost).

Course description and details in development.

Online Courses Fall 2018

SA013/113 online: Introduction to Christian Theology
Online: Sept. 10 - Dec. 7, 2018 
(D. Schweitzer)

An introduction to major themes of Christian theology: God, creation, human nature, Christ, salvation, the community of faith, and the goal of salvation history. These themes are studied in the context of issues such as the irruption of difference in terms of race, gender, sexual orientation, the impact of globalization, the ecological crises and the changing places of churches in Western societies. The overarching goal of the course is to help students interpret the Christian faith in relation to life in the contemporary world.

SA052/152 online: Introduction to Christian Ethics
Online: Sept. 10 - Dec. 7, 2018 (L. Caldwell)

In this introductory course, learn about methods for analyzing moral arguments and responding to ethical dilemmas through a study of diverse traditions in Christian ethics. Explore the roles of Scripture, tradition, reason and experience as sources for ethical discernment and develop a reflective and critical approach to naming and responding to contemporary ethical issues.

BE055/155 online: Early Christian Scriptures I
Online: Sept. 10 - Dec. 7, 2018 (W. Richards)

This course (Early Christian Scriptures I & II) invites a careful reading of all the New Testament writings, as well as some other examples of early letters, sayings-collections, etiologies, hymn-collections, apocalypses, and testimonies. The next set of texts for study illustrate how early Christians combined and edited such materials in shaping longer documents. Our literary concern is with appreciating the layers of meaning that have been created within the text in its present state, while our historical concern is with identifying the issues that their first Christian readers were having to face. BE055/155 focuses on texts with the strongest links to Judaism (Mark, Matthew, James, the Didache, "Q"). BE056/156 (Winter 2019) shifts the focus to those texts which more explicitly address a Gentile audience (Paul, John, Luke-Acts).

Winter 2019 Online

SA014/214: Christology
Online: Jan. 14 - April 12, 2019 (D. Schweitzer)

Prerequisite: SA113 Introduction to Christian Ethics (or equivalent), or permission of instructors.

Beginning from the historical Jesus and drawing on contemporary critical Christologies, this course follows the development of faith in Jesus as the Christ and examines different ways of understanding his saving significance in different contexts. The goal is to equip students to develop and articulate their own Christology in a way that is authentic to the Christian tradition, their own experience, the experiences of others with whom they are in dialogue and the needs of communities to which the students belong.

BE056/156 online: Early Christian Scriptures I
Online: Jan. 14 - April 12, 2019 (W. Richards)

This course (Early Christian Scriptures I & II) invites a careful reading of all the New Testament writings, as well as some other examples of early letters, sayings-collections, etiologies, hymn-collections, apocalypses, and testimonies. The next set of texts for study illustrate how early Christians combined and edited such materials in shaping longer documents. Our literary concern is with appreciating the layers of meaning that have been created within the text in its present state, while our historical concern is with identifying the issues that their first Christian readers were having to face. BE055/155 (Fall 2018) focuses on texts with the strongest links to Judaism (Mark, Matthew, James, the Didache, "Q"). BE056/156 (Winter 2019) shifts the focus to those texts which more explicitly address a Gentile audience (Paul, John, Luke-Acts).