Five New Faculty Positions in Water-related Sciences

Five New Faculty Positions in Water-related Sciences School of Environment and Sustainability and Global Institute for Water Security

The School of Environment and Sustainability (SENS) at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) invites applications for up to five full-time tenure-track faculty positions at the level of assistant, associate, or full professor. The successful candidates will join a core interdisciplinary science and modelling team to support the development of a $30-million research programme within the University's new

Global Institute for Water Security (under development) led by Canada Excellence Research Chair in Water Security (CERC) Howard Wheater. This exciting initiative builds on a long history of national leadership in hydrology, aquatic toxicology and other water-related expertise at the U of S that includes more than 65 faculty and 5 research chairs, and world-class facilities such as the Centre for Hydrology, the Toxicology Centre, and the Canadian Light Source synchrotron. The five new appointments are envisaged in the following areas (additional details can be found at www.usask.ca/sens): The appointees will be expected to address one or more of the three core themes of the CERC programme (Climate Change and Water Security, Land-Water Management and Environmental Change, Sustainable Development of Natural Resources) and to contribute to the development of interdisciplinary water research across the University and with external partners such as Environment Canada. A successful candidate must have a PhD, an established national or international reputation for research in one of the areas listed above and relevant to the core themes of the CERC programme, a demonstrated ability to secure research funding, and a proven track record of teaching and research supervision. Excellent interpersonal skills are required, and evidence of successful research collaboration with national and international stakeholders and researchers is desirable. Successful candidates will be appointed to tenure-track positions in the School of Environment and Sustainability, but may also seek joint appointments with other academic units if desired and appropriate. Review of applications will begin March 15, 2011, and continue until suitable candidates are identified.

The University of Saskatchewan is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada (www.tourismsaskatoon.com), a city with a diverse and thriving economic base, a strong research cluster, a vibrant arts community, and a full range of leisure opportunities. The University has a reputation for excellence in teaching, research, and scholarly activities, and offers a full range of undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs to a student population of about 20,000. The University is one of Canada's leading research-intensive universities.

For information about the University of Saskatchewan, please visit www.usask.ca. For information about the School of Environment and Sustainability, please visit www.usask.ca/sens. Further details about the U of S CERC programme can be found at www.usask.ca/water.

To be considered for one of these opportunities, please send your CV, a letter of introduction, the names of three

  1. Hydrometeorology and climate science: data assimilation methods, and the analysis and modelling of hydrological extremes.
  2. Statistical hydrology and stochastic processes: performance analysis and downscaling methods development, and the modelling and analysis of spatial-temporal precipitation.
  3. Water resources systems and hydro-informatics: remote-sensing data products and the development of decision support systems for water resources modelling under uncertainty.
  4. Surface water quality assessment and modelling: environments, including assessment of the impacts of climate change and land management activities on contaminant fate and transport, biogeochemical cycling, and lake eutrophication.
  5. 5. Hydro-ecological assessment or modelling: the land-water interface, and at the ecosystem and/or watershed scale, under conditions of anthropogenic or environmental change.

Assessment or modelling of aquatic ecosystem dynamics, including processes at Water quality model development for coupled terrestrial and aquatic Hydrological and water resources systems modelling, including assimilation of modelling of hydro-ecological systems, including climate model Coupled land-atmosphere modelling, including land-surface system model development,

Kate Wilson, Confidential Secretary to the Search Committee School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan Saskatoon, SK Canada S7N 5C8

E-mail: kate.wilson@usask.ca

The University of Saskatchewan is committed to employment equity. Members of designated groups (women, aboriginal people, people with disabilities and visible minorities) are encouraged to self-identify on their applications. Applications will be judged solely on academic promise and achievement, but for candidates of equal ability, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

Positions in Water-related Sciences School of Environment and Sustainability and Global Institute for Water Security

Background and Further Details

The University of Saskatchewan (U of S) has recognised Water Security as a key challenge for society in the 21st Century, and has designated this as a signature area of research excellence and focus for the University. Central to this initiative is the Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) programme, led by Dr. Howard Wheater, which has $30 million of initial support from the Federal and Provincial governments and the University, for the first 7 years of a long-term research programme. This exciting initiative builds on a long history of national leadership in hydrology, aquatic toxicology and other waterrelated expertise at the U of S that includes more than 65 faculty and 5 research chairs, and world-class facilities such as the Centre for Hydrology, the

Toxicology Centre and the Canadian Light Source synchrotron.

A key objective of this initiative is to develop more fully the very substantial interdisciplinary potential that exists in Saskatoon for research in water-related sciences, and to support the development of a new Global Institute for Water Security which will provide a vehicle for a broadly-based interdisciplinary programme, including the natural sciences, engineering, social sciences and health. The CERC core staff will be located on campus at the National Hydrology Research Centre, a purpose-built research centre with world-class facilities, and the research programme will be developed in close collaboration with Environment Canada and other key research partners and stakeholders. The funded CERC programme has resources to support 6 new faculty positions, up to 60 research fellows and graduate students, as well as administrative and technical support staff, and an active programme of academic visitors and international workshops. It will also be making major investments in field experimental facilities. The CERC research agenda focuses on issues of global strategic importance, but also of particular resonance for western Canada.

The three core themes and objectives are:

A. Climate Change and Water Security

  • Improve understanding of interactions between terrestrial ecosystems and atmospheric processes, and of the impacts of climate variability on water-related ecosystem function
  • Improve the quality of global and regional climatic models and enable better downscaling for water-related climate change impacts assessment
  • Improve assessment of water supply and quality variability, including climate change impacts; and
  • Develop new decision support tools for water security analysis to enable policy development.

B. Land-Water Management and Environmental Change

  • Improve agricultural land-water management through understanding of multiple stressor effects and water quantity and quality impacts at watershed scales;
  • Inform development of water quality modelling tools through better understanding of hydrology, water quality and aquatic ecology interactions; and
  • Develop new decision support tools for management and remediation of diffuse pollution, including impacts on aquatic ecosystem health.

C. Sustainable Development of Natural Resources

  • Better understand pollutant effects on ecological and human health through understanding pollutant toxicity and integrating assessments across terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems;
  • Develop integrated decision support tools for risk assessment and remediation of contaminated land and water, including biodegradation and sequestration of pollutants; and
  • Support new assessment and remediation technologies through better understanding of interactions among hydrology, ecotoxicology, water quality and wetland ecology, including potential for bioremediation in the subsurface (both soil and groundwater) and in wetlands.

Canadian exemplars have been defined as follows: Theme A, the Saskatchewan River Basin; Theme B, the South Saskatchewan River basin to Saskatoon (including Lake Diefenbaker); and Theme C, Oil Sands remediation and risk assessment. However, international research initiatives in related thematic areas are also under active development.

The new faculty appointments available to the CERC programme have been designed to complement existing expertise and to form a core interdisciplinary science and modelling team to support the CERC programme and the new Global Institute for Water Security. Applications are now invited for up to five fulltime tenure-track faculty positions at the level of assistant, associate, or full professor (the sixth appointment has already been made, in subsurface hydrology and water quality modelling). The five new appointments will be expected to contribute to the development of the new Institute, and specifically to one or more of the three CERC themes. Appointments are envisaged in the following areas:

1. Hydrometeorology and climate science: methods, and the analysis and modelling of hydrological extremes.

One of the CERC priorities is to build on the cold regions hydrology expertise at the U of S and Environment Canada in order to improve the coupled modelling of land-atmosphere interactions and processes in the context of climate variability and change. Experimental resources will include a set of highly instrumented sites for real-time monitoring of snow, water, energy and carbon fluxes. Modelling resources envisaged will include a parallelprocessing computer facility and access to numerical weather prediction, and regional and global climate models. Improved understanding and representation of hydrological extremes and cold regions feedbacks to the atmosphere are priorities. It is envisaged that close collaboration will be established with the international World Climate Research Program (WCRP) Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) and Cryosphere and Climate (CLiC) programmes.

2. Statistical hydrology and stochastic processes: and downscaling methods development, and the modelling and analysis of spatial-temporal precipitation.

An important ambition of the CERC programme is the development of more sophisticated approaches to the use of climate data and climate model outputs through the development of improved downscaled data products for hydrological impacts assessment. This links more generally to issues of spatial-temporal modelling and analysis of precipitation for hydrological applications, including flood and drought forecasting and simulation, the role of input uncertainty in hydrological models, and spatial analysis of risk. It is envisaged that the successful candidate would have a track record in one or more of these areas, in addition to an interest in providing statistical expertise to the CERC programme.

3. Water resources systems and hydro-informatics: data products and the development of decision support systems for water resources modelling under uncertainty.

A key ambition of the CERC is to provide data and modelling tools that can be used by a range of stakeholders in addressing decision making under uncertainty, with applications including water resource system response under scenarios of future climate and predictions in ungauged basins. Applications in Canada and elsewhere require modelling under limitations of large spatial scales and limited ground-based observations. Research challenges for hydrological models therefore include the assimilation of remotely-sensed data products, developing methodologies for predicting in poorly gauged or ungauged basins, the incorporation of anthropogenic controls on water systems, and the representation of predictive uncertainty. More generally there is a need to represent non-stationarity in terrestrial and aquatic systems within decision support models. The successful candidate for this post will have expertise in several of these areas of application, and a demonstrable interest in stakeholder communication.

4. Surface water quality assessment and modelling: assessment of the impacts of climate change and land management activities on nutrient and contaminant fate and transport, biogeochemical cycling, and lake eutrophication.

The CERC programme is concerned with anthropogenic effects on water quality, including impacts of climate variability and change. A particular set of issues arises in the context of nutrient loadings from human and agricultural sources to rivers and lakes, and potential eutrophication, for example of Lake Diefenbaker. However, there is potentially a wide-ranging set of water quality issues of concern, ranging from climate warming impacts on the nitrogen cycle in cold regions and effects of urban and industrial releases of chemicals to the aquatic environment, to issues of changing water temperature and associated implications for fish habitat. The successful applicant for this post will have generic skills in model development, hydrochemical modelling, surface water quality assessment, and systems analysis, and demonstrable experience of practical model applications in one or more of the above areas of interest.

5. Hydro-ecological assessment or modelling: interface and at the ecosystem and/or watershed scale, under conditions of anthropogenic or environmental change.

A major challenge for integrated assessment of the impacts of environmental change is to bridge the disciplines of hydrology, aquatic ecology and toxicology in the assessment and modelling of aquatic ecosystem response at the ecosystem and/or watershed scales. The successful applicant for this post should have a background in either hydro-ecological or eco-toxicological assessment or modelling at ecosystem and/or watershed scales, including the effects of environmental change (e.g., climate/precipitation change), pollution, or increased water utilization in resource, energy and/or municipal development on systems dynamics and ecosystem services, and/or the assessment of causes of ecological deterioration and options for ecosystem restoration.

A successful candidate must have a PhD, an established international reputation for research, or clear evidence of the potential to achieve this, in one of the areas listed above and relevant to the core themes of the CERC programme, a demonstrated ability to secure research funding, and a proven track record of teaching and research supervision. Excellent interpersonal skills are required, and evidence of successful research collaboration with national and international stakeholders and researchers is desirable. Successful candidates will be appointed to tenure-track positions in the School of

Environment and Sustainability, but may also seek joint appointments with other academic units if desired and appropriate. Review of applications will begin March 15, 2011, and continue until suitable candidates are identified.

For information about the University of Saskatchewan, please visit www.usask.ca. For information about the School of Environment and Sustainability, please visit www.usask.ca/sens. Further details about the U of S CERC programme can be found at www.usask.ca/water. Further information on the U of S Centre for Hydrology can be found at www.usask.ca/hydrology and on the Toxicology Centre at www.usask.ca/toxicology.

To be considered for one of these opportunities, please send your CV, a letter of introduction, the names of three referees, and a summary of your proposed research program and graduate training philosophy in confidence to:

Kate Wilson, Confidential Secretary to the Search Committee School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan Saskatoon, SK Canada S7N 5C8

E-mail: kate.wilson@usask.ca

The University of Saskatchewan is committed to employment equity. Members of designated groups (women, aboriginal people, people with disabilities and visible minorities) are encouraged to self-identify on their applications. Applications will be judged solely on academic promise and achievement, but for candidates of equal ability, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

Assessment or modelling of aquatic ecosystem dynamics, including processes at the land-water Water quality model development for coupled terrestrial and aquatic environments, including Hydrological and water resources systems modelling, including assimilation of remote-sensing Stochastic modelling of hydro-ecological systems, including climate model performance analysis Coupled land-atmosphere modelling, including land-surface system model development, data assimilation