Graduate Program (interdisciplinary)

Graduate Program

Opportunities

The Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Toxicology at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) offers Ph.D. and M.Sc. degrees with specialization across a wide range of toxicological expertise.

The interdisciplinary nature of the U of S Toxicology Program, along with the diverse interests of a large number of graduate faculty in the U of S Toxicology Group, provides students with a wide array of potential research opportunities.

Applicants to the Toxicology Graduate Program must possess a recognized undergraduate degree in the life or natural sciences. Undergraduate training should include basic courses in biology, chemistry, biochemistry, physiology, and statistics. Courses in environmental chemistry, ecology, and pharmacology or toxicology are desirable.

For more information on the Toxicology Graduate Program, refer to the Graduate Student Handbook.

To Apply

The U of S Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Toxicology is highly regarded by potential employers, including industry, consulting firms, government agencies, and academia. Graduates are well prepared for professional careers in toxicology and are highly successful in finding suitable employment or pursuing further postgraduate training.

Applications are now accepted online at: http://www.usask.ca/cgsr/.  Please note - *No application deadline*

Funding

All graduate students are guaranteed full funding

Minimum stipends:

  • Ph.D. $20,400
  • M.Sc. $17,400

Earn extra as a teaching assistant

Basic health insurance coverage guaranteed

Graduate Core Courses

TOX 810: Radiation and Radionuclide Toxicology

Description
Describes the basic properties of ionizing radiation, the interaction of radiation with matter, radiation detection, units and dosimetry. Discusses the natural radiation environment, radioactivity and its distribution and accumulation by chemical and biological processes. Presents the biological effects of radiation, particularly carcinogenesis, both at the epidemiological and molecular level.
Credit units:
.3
Term description:
1/2(3L)
Prerequisite(s):
Minimum of one university-level course in any four of physics, chemistry, microbiology, statistics, cell biology, or ecology.

TOX 820: Exposure Assessment

Description
The objectives of this course is to discuss how exposure to chemical hazards is estimated and evaluated from a modeling and observational approach. Students will become familiar with applications of local, regional and global environmental fate models and how this links to human and ecosystem exposure. Following this, techniques and approaches used to evaluate exposure to human populations will be explored with an emphasis on how spatial and global trends influence human susceptibility to hazards.
Credit units:
.3
Term description:
1/2(3L)
Prerequisite(s):
None

TOX 821: Human Health Chemical Risk Assessment

Description
Human health risk assessment is now playing a major role in the environmental management of chemicals, from both operational and regulatory perspectives. The quantitative assessment of potential health risk is now routine for chemicals in ambient air, indoor air, drinking water, commercial and country foods, soil, indoor dust, and innumerable consumer products (drugs, medical and dental devices and materials, pesticides, cosmetics, natural health products (nutriceuticals), tobacco products, nutritional supplements, building materials, paints and coatings, etc).
Prerequisite(s):
None

TOX 840: Wildlife Toxicology

Description
Intended to provide a broad exposure to general principles of terrestrial toxicology, with an emphasis on mammalian, avian and amphibian species. Topics to be covered include: effects of common environmental contaminants on wildlife populations; factors affecting soil toxicity, contaminant bioavailability, and fate; common in vitro and in vivo methods to assess toxicity and sublethal exposure (biomarkers); and ecological risk assessment.
Credit units:
.3
Term description:
2(3L)
Prerequisite(s):
TOX 300 and TOX 301, or permission of instructor.

TOX 842: Biochemical Toxicology

Description
To provide students with a comprehensive understanding of various biochemical mechanisms of toxicity, from both biomedical (human) and ecotoxicological perspectives. The focus will be on applying basic knowledge of biochemisty and physiology to the science of toxicology. Classes will involve discussions on topics related to the text and supplemental journal articles.
Credit units:
.3
Term description:
2(3L)

TOX 843: Environmental Chemodynamics

Description
Supplies students with an understanding of the processes that control the movement of organic and inorganic contaminants in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere and will also provide an understanding of the methods used to monitor environmental behavior of potentially toxic contaminants in biotic and abiotic matrices.
Credit units:
.3
Term description:
2(3L)
Prerequisite(s):
One course in ecology or environmental biology and one course in general or environmental chemistry, or permission of the instructor and student's advisor/advisory committee.

TOX 844: Toxicology Techniques

Description
Provides theoretical background and hands-on experience in methods and techniques typically applied by toxicology professionals in academia, industry, and government. It is a modular course that covers a broad spectrum of procedures, ranging from proper handling of field equipment to biological test methods and analytical processing of samples. This course conforms to the academic requirements and standards of graduate courses, including the rules of Academic Honesty and Student Appeals in Academic Matters.
Credit units:
.3
Term description:
1/2(3L)
Permission of the department required.
 
Prerequisite(s):
Successful completion of Laboratory Safety course and GSR 962.

TOX 850: Aquatic Toxicology

Description
Will present a comprehensive overview of the technical aspects of predicting, monitoring, and evaluating the effects of toxic substances in aquatic systems. The class will cover levels of organization from sub-cellular to ecosystem. It is designed as an in-depth coverage of Aquatic Toxicology for students pursuing graduate degrees in the aquatic sciences. Students will be exposed to materials which will be useful in setting exposure standards and assessing hazards to aquatic ecosystems due to point or non-point releases of toxic substances. This course conforms to the academic requirements and standards for graduate courses, including the rules of Academic Honesty (see http://www.usask.ca/honesty/ ) and Student Appeals in Academic Matters (see http://www.usask.ca/university_council/reports/12-06-99.shtml ).
Credit units:
.3
Term description:
1(3L-2P)
Formerly:
TOX 898.3
Prerequisite(s):
Permission of the Toxicology Graduate Program

TOX 860: Applied Toxicology

Description
Provides students an opportunity to evaluate practical problems associated with various aspects of toxicology. Students will be presented with specific toxicological questions or concerns which will be examined using research information and library facilities.
Credit units:
.3
Term description:
1&2(1L-S/T)
Prerequisite(s):
Registration in the Toxicology Graduate Program or permission of the instructor.
Note:
Recommended additional credit units in TOX.

SLSC 819: Remediation and Reclamation of Contaminated Sites

Description
This course explains how one characterizes a contaminated terrestrial site, the risks associated with that site and identify remediation technologies that will mitigate the risks associated with the contaminated site. We will discuss how contamination interacts with industrial processes to created degraded landscapes and natural processes that help ameloriate this degradation of the ecosystem. Our discussion of remediation will focus on the use of in situ and ex situ technologies for contaminated soil ecosystems and how these technologies reduce risk to not only soil, but also human and aquatic receptors.
Prerequisite(s):
None

TOX 990: Seminar

Description
Reviews of literature and recent investigations. Graduate students are required to attend and to present seminars.

TOX 994: Research

Description
Students writing a Master's thesis must register for this course.

TOX 996: Research

Description
Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register for this course.

TOX 898: Special Topics

Description
Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Student Awards

In addition to standard graduate scholarships and fellowships, the Toxicology Graduate Program and the Toxicology Undergraduate Program provide the following special awards opportunities to full-time students. Selection of recipients of the awards is made by the Toxicology Awards Committee in April of each year. The awards are typically presented at the Toxicology Group Annual General Meeting, which is generally held each May. A brief list of the awards and their dollar value is given below, followed by a more in-depth description and recent award winners.

Undergraduate student awards

  • The Dr. Chatur Sisodia Graduate Scholarship ($1,000)
  • The H.B. (Bruno) Schiefer Student Travel Award ($1,000)
  • Toxicology Graduate Student's Association Travel Award ($500)
  • NuRx Non-Clinical Services Alberta Innovates Technology Futures Student Poster Competition Award ($300, $200, $100)

Doug Hancock Memorial Award

Leanne Flahr, 2013-14 winner of the Doug Hancock Memorial Award

This award and a statistic textbook was awarded to Toxicology graduate student Leanne Flahr. 2013-14

Presenting the award, Dr. Morrissey, Toxicology Centre.


The Dr. Chatur Sisodia Graduate Scholarship

Toxicology graduate student Anita Massé receives the 2013-14  Dr. Chatur Sisodia Graduate Scholarship.

The Dr. Chatur Sisodia Graduate Scholarship is presented annually to a full-time graduate student registered in the Toxicology Graduate Program who has completed a minimum of two years of formal course work. The $1,000 award recognizes academic excellence in the field of toxicology and is a tribute to Dr. Chatur Sisodia, the first Academic Coordinator for the program.

Toxicology graduate student Anita Massé receives the 2013-14 Dr. Chatur Sisodia Graduate Scholarship.

Presenting the award, Dr.Blakley, Toxicology Centre Professor.


H.B. Schiefer Graduate Student Travel Award

H.B. Schiefer Graduate Student Travel Award for 2013-14 was received by David Saunders and  Courtney Gerger.

This award is intended to provide one travel grant of up to $1,000 (or two partial travel grants totaling $1,000) annually to a graduate student(s) in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Toxicology. Students must be presenting research findings from their University of Saskatchewan toxicology graduate work (in either platform or poster format) at a national or international scientific meeting in order to be eligible for the award. Selection will be based on a combination of academic standing, research progress and quality, and financial need.

H.B. Schiefer Graduate Student Travel Award for 2013-14 was received by David Saunders and Courtney Gerger.


NuRx Non-Clinical Services Alberta Innovates Technology Futures Student Poster Competition Award

Alberta Innovates Technology Futures Student Poster Competition Award for 2013-14 winners, Kristin Painter(1st), Jonathon Doering(2nd), and Leanne Flahr(3rd)

Each year following the Toxicology Group Annual General Meeting, students have an opportunity to present their research findings in poster format and offer a five minute oral presentation on the material provided in their poster. Awards of $300 (first place), $200 (second place), and $100 (third place) are offered to students working towards an M.Sc. or Ph.D. in toxicology. Judging is focussed primarily on the quality of research material provided, the physical nature and overall appearance of the poster, and the clarity and conciseness of the oral presentation.

Alberta Innovates Technology Futures Student Poster Competition Award for 2013-14

  • 1st place was received by Kristin Painter.  Presenting the award, Dr. Tim Jardine, Toxicology Centre.
  • 2nd place, Jonathon Doering.  Presenting the award, Dr. Steve Wiseman, Toxicology Centre. 
  • 3rd place, Leanne Flahr.  Presenting the award, Dr. Christy Morrissey, Toxicology Centre. 

The Toxicology Graduate Student Association (TGSA)

The Toxicology Graduate Student Association (TGSA) organizes social events throughout the year, provides academic support for students, and acts as the liaison between the Graduate Students Association (GSA) and toxicology graduate students. Please contact any TGSA executive member if you wish to become involved in an event or have any questions or comments.

david saunders

President
David Saunders

Dave has been vying for the presidency 
of the TGSA for several years and dreams
to finally implement a Utlitarian government

Garrett Morandi

Vice President
Garrett Morandi

Bringing some of the fun from the
East. West.

Breda Muldoon

Treasurer
Breda Maldoon

The keeper of the TGSA booty

Melanie Gallant

VP Academic
Melanie Gallant

Hey, I just met you, and this crazy.
but here's my number (and email), so call 
me maybe (if you have any questions 
about the program)!

 

Brett Tendler

VP Social
Brett Tendler

I joined to spend more time with
Sarah!

sarah patterson

VP Social
Sarah Patterson

I joined to get away from Brett....

 

Sara Hanson

VP Sports and Recreation
Sara Hanson

Sara loves horses sooooooo much....

Vanessa Cowan

Public Relations Coordinator
Vanessa Cowan

Vanessa... is OH LOOK A SQUIRREL!

 

Kean Steeves

VP Fundraising
Kean Steeves

Kean has been a ballroom instructor
for 45 years and hopes to bring those 
experiences to the TGSA

 

Timothy Tse

VP Fundraising
Tim Tse

Former: Disgraced rodeo clown, psychic,
compulsive
shopper.  
Current: Mediocre graduate student