Philosophic truth is to be sought in the presuppositions of language rather than in its express statements. For this reason philosophy is akin to poetry, and both of them seek to express that ultimate good sense which we term civilization.

Alfred North Whitehead, Modes of Thought,New York, The Free Press, 1938, p. vii.


The paradox which wrecks so many promising theories of education is that the training which produces skill is so very apt to stifle imaginative zest. Skill demands repetition, and imaginative zest is tinged with impulse.

Alfred North Whitehead, Process and Reality, New York, The Free Press, 1929/1957, p. 399.